Solder print by Jason Tozer

solder_0.jpg - Solder print by Jason Tozer - 17

Close, Jason Tozer’s recent exhibition at London’s Print Space Gallery, offered up a selection of pieces by the photo­grapher that played on the notion of things not being quite as they seem. Tozer closes in on micro-worlds in much of his work and displayed images of bubbles that look uncannily like planets, details of cracked ice that evoke entire winter landscapes, and also shots of some strange objects that, according to Tozer, many people thought resembled “silver birch trees, dragons, or even skulls”. The subject matter for this particular series of images was, in fact, pieces of hardened solder.

“I was actually aiming to shoot what happens the instant hot molten metal interacts with cold water,” Tozer explains. “But when we were tipping the solder from a saucepan into a glass tank and shooting through the side, the results were far from exciting. However, the process left me with lots of one-to-two-centimetre-long pieces of self-cast solder in the bottom of the tank. In amongst countless pellet- shaped forms were several fascinating constructions. Photographing them revealed all sorts of intrigue. They’re like Rorschach tests. Blowing these tiny objects up to 40-inch prints shows off some amazing details.”

Tozer has kindly donated one of these large-format prints for this month’s Gallery prize. It’s a 30 × 40″ c-type photographic print, on Crystal Archive Matt paper, that normally sells at £500 through the art and design prints website, (who also sell an edition of 25 at a smaller size, 15 × 20″, for £300 each). To enter our competition to win the solder print, tell us the full name of the man who originally conceived the Rorschach test. Send your entries on a postcard to: Gallery, Creative Review, 50 Poland Street, London w1f 7ax to arrive no later than March 31. Or enter online at Terms and conditions on request.

To see the full range of Tozer’s Close work available to buy, go to