CR Blog

The YouTube Dilemma

Advertising, Music Video / Film

Posted by Eliza Williams, 11 May 2009, 11:11    Permalink    Comments (37)

Aero Feel The Bubbles, acknowledged by JWT to have been inspired by a film on YouTube

YouTube provides a steady stream of inspiration to advertising creatives, but it also leaves young directors vulnerable to having ideas stolen and agencies open to accusations of plagiarism. How can both directors and agencies protect themselves?

In 1998, director Mehdi Norowzian sued the Irish advertising agency Arks Ltd for copyright infringement. He claimed Arks had copied a substantial part of his short film, Joy, in its hugely successful Anticipation advert for Guinness which featured a man performing a flamboyant dance as he waited for his pint of the black stuff to settle. Norowzian lost, the case setting a precedent over the legal rights of directors and artists when claiming the artistic content of their work had been ‘appropriated’ by an agency.


Guinness Anticipation ad

The tense question of plagiarism has become a regular part of advertising life ever since. Accusations from artists and directors crop up period­ically in the media, where a discussion on their validity will take place before the subject is usually dropped. The agency in question may be left with a minor stain on its integrity but with no major ill-effects to its client relationship or bank balance. The rise of internet sites such as YouTube has made this issue even more pertinent, however. Suddenly a research tool is available to advertising creatives giving access to millions of films and ideas from all over the world, leaving the makers of these films vulnerable to having their ideas stolen.


Sony Bravia Zoetrope ad

Unlike the more established artists and directors, who have an army of colleagues and fans to vociferously defend their creative ideas if they suddenly turn up in a TV ad, the users of YouTube are often young filmmakers, usually unrepresented by production companies, and therefore especially vulnerable. The weapon of choice for young directors in such situations has become the online blog. With the mainstream media unlikely to pick up a story about plagiarism from someone unestab­lished, the blog comments box has become an effective place to air grievances. A recent example of this occurred on the CR Blog, where the posting of a new Sony Bravia ad, featuring a life-size zoe­trope, caused an immediate backlash on behalf of a young director, Mark Simon Hewis, with claims that Fallon, the agency behind the spot, had based the commercial on a short film by Hewis. The situ­ation raised a number of questions, about how young directors can protect themselves against their ideas being stolen, but also about the increas­ing necessity for ad agencies to find ways to defend themselves against accusations of plagiarism.

In the case of the Sony Bravia ad, the similar­ities between the film by Hewis and the ad by Fallon are minimal beyond the fact that both rest on the concept of a life-size zoetrope. Hewis’ film is a poetic rendition of a man’s life story, whereas the Bravia ad sees footballer Kaka showing off his ball skills. Yet Hewis had been approached by RSA, the production company that worked on the ad, with a view to working on an ‘up and coming advert opportunity’ and was asked to sign a non-disclosure agreement on behalf of Fallon which mentioned Sony. When the Sony ad came out, and Hewis had heard nothing more from RSA or Fallon, colleagues leapt to conclusions and to his defence via the CR Blog.


Mark Simon Hewis' film

“I got a sense the Sony ad was maybe influ­enced by Mark’s film,” says Katie Daniels, a freelance producer who worked on the film and contacted CR at the time of the blog story on the Bravia spot. “Obviously the idea of a zoetrope is not new, but from the atmosphere I had a sense that they’d watched the film. But it wouldn’t be so grating if they hadn’t got in touch and then we’d not heard from them again, that was bad etiquette. Directors are creating these films as showpieces for little or no money in the hope they’ll get commercial work.”

Following the furore on the blog, Fallon explained that the contact had been made with Hewis in relation to a different strand of the project for Sony, and that the production of the Bravia-drome ad was already well underway by the time this occurred. The agency is also categorical in its assertion that it never takes its ideas from outside sources. “We would be doing ourselves a huge disservice if we were found to be deliberately taking an idea from elsewhere,” says Fallon partner Chris Willingham. “That’s so fundamental to our work, and why clients choose us.”


Sony Bravia Play-Doh ad

This is not the first time that Fallon has been under fire for allegedly being influenced by the work of others, however. When the agency’s Play Doh ad for Sony was released in 2007, the artists Kozyndan complained on numerous blogs, including CR’s, about the commercial’s similarity to an artwork by the duo which features multi-coloured bunnies hopping through a cityscape. In this instance, Passion Pictures, the production company for the ad, had been in contact with Kozyndan in the past but nothing had come of it. Both Passion Pictures and Fallon firmly deny that the idea was taken from Kozyndan’s work.

It’s easy to assume here that the advertising agency is always in the wrong. Certainly there are plenty of famous examples where ideas from artists appear to have been directly adapted for ad campaigns, with seemingly little concern for the source of the work. In 2003, Wieden + Kennedy’s ad Cog was criticised in the media for its similarity to art film Der Lauf Der Dinge by Fischli & Weiss, and in 1998 artist Gillian Wearing complained about the likeness between her series of photographs which depict people holding hand-written signs, and a VW campaign by BMP DDB. More recently, a John Lewis campaign by Lowe featured shadow sculptures that bore a striking resemblance to artworks by Tim Noble & Sue Webster. At the time, Ed Morris, executive creative director at Lowe, acknowledged that the artists’ work was mentioned when discussing the concept of the ad, but that the core idea was already on the table before it came up.


Honda Cog ad

Which brings us to the thorny issue of whether a commercial has only been ‘inspired’ by another piece of work, consciously or unconsciously, or whether an idea has been deliberately lifted. This is naturally a blurred area, especially as creatives, like the rest of us, are constantly bombarded with imagery. In the continuous quest to come up with new ideas for ads, it is perhaps inevitable that some of this visual input might be unintentionally recycled. This might sound like woolly excuse making, but it is far from unusual. Writing on this issue on Design Observer, graphic designer Michael Bierut recounted how he’d realised that a poster he created in 2005 was remarkably similar to a piece from 1975 by one of his favourite designers, Willi Kunz. For Bierut the replication was made uncon­sciously, and made him worry. “I don’t claim to have a photographic memory, but my mind is stuffed full of graphic design, graphic design done by other people,” he wrote. “How can I be sure that any idea that comes out of that same mind is absol­utely my own?”


Visa Life Flows Better ad

Acknowledgments such as Bierut’s are perhaps unlikely to ever be heard from an ad agency, however. And often, of course, advertising is consciously influenced by others’ work. In these instances a surprising trend is emerging, where agencies are starting to give credit to their sources. Fans of music videos may have been surprised to see a recent Visa ad from Saatchi & Saatchi, which featured a man on crutches dancing through a city. A very similar performance had been seen recently in a video for dance music act RJD2, by director Joey Garfield, and it would be easy to conclude Saatchis had simply lifted the idea for their ad. This was true, but it turned out that the agency had also picked up the performer and director, along with the idea.


RJD2 Work It Out video

“We do the Saatchi & Saatchi new directors’ showcase and trawl the internet looking for interesting stuff to put forward for this,” explains creative director Kate Stanners. “We found this piece of work by Joey Garfield and thought it would be amazing for Visa. We wanted Joey to be acknow­ledged in the showcase for having done the piece of film, but equally we wanted to approach him for Visa. We wouldn’t have pursued doing the ad if it wasn’t with Joey and Bill [Shannon, the performer in the spot], and it ended up being Joey’s first commercial.” Stanners acknowledged that it would probably have been easier just to approach Shannon for the ad and work with a more established director, but felt it was important to work with Garfield too.


ZzZ Grip video

Another music video that was adapted for advertising purposes recently was Roel Wouters’ promo Grip for zZz. Distinctive for its use of trampolines, the video had done the rounds of the industry’s media. When he was approached by ad agency Krow Communi­cations to replicate the ad for a Fiat Grande Punto ad, however, Wouters was not keen. At this juncture, an agency might typically have gone off and made their own version anyway, but Krow went out of its way to acknowledge the influence of Wouters’ work and paid him a license fee. This then freed them up to replicate the promo without fear, which they did, to a degree that surprised even Wouters. “I never thought they would copy it,” he told CR at the time. “But I think it is quite honest, they’re not acting as if they’ve come up with the idea themselves. Making the decision to do such an exact copy is weird but quite strong I think, it gives the feeling of a sincere tribute.”


Fiat Grand Punto Trampoline ad

Even those outside of the industry are beginning to see credit given to their work. In the press materials accompanying the release of a recent Aero ad from JWT London (shown top), there was an acknowledgement that the spot had been inspired by a film on YouTube. Both films show a skate­boarder plowing through balloons in a skate park. JWT creative director Russell Ramsay recognises that YouTube has changed the research process for agencies. “All these references are instantly accessible now, which they didn’t use to be,” he says. “There are so many ads that have been influenced by films and by art. But now the influences can be instantly found, whereas they couldn’t be in the past…. Part of the skill is matching these ideas to a brand. Advertising does use these things to that end, and always has done.”


Balloon Bowl film

Despite seeing the similarities between the two films, Ramsay still feels they are essentially different. “We thought of the YouTube film as the recording of an event,” he says. “We wanted to get the best skateboarder – if you watch that film, it’s not the best performance of it…. We did acknow­ledge it in the end, but I think we’ve done enough to it for people to not be that outraged by it. But people have to make up their own minds.”

This nod to the YouTube filmmaker from JWT, however grudgingly given, does seem a step in the right direction, although the next logical move, where filmmakers receive renumeration for their ideas, seems unlikely to occur. Ideas cannot be copyrighted, and, as the Norowzian case proved, using the law to prove plagiarism of imagery can be fraught with difficulty, and expensive. Further­more, despite the good example set by Krow with Wouters, this still doesn’t get around the issue of what an agency does if an artist or director says a flat ‘no’ to having any involvement with the commercial. All too often, the idea still gets made, and there is little that the originator of the idea can do about it. In this sense, we are perhaps no further on than we were ten years ago. However, with the internet providing an easy outlet for film­makers to complain when they feel their ideas have been pinched, a new wave of consciousness does seem to be beginning to sweep over ad agencies. “I think ad creatives are very conscious of the notion of originality,” says Kate Stanners in their defence, “because part of your job is to come up with original ideas. There is a respect for ideas and there is a respect for the originators of ideas.”

37 Comments

Great Post.

I've been running an occasional series on my blog entitled, New ads coming your way, which aims to pick up those films ad creatives will pinch.

I'm not against the pinching, after all Picasso was a great fan, but it's down to what you do with it next. Unfortunately, most ad creatives do next to nothing, whether out of laziness or lack of talent I'm not sure.

And I would have to disagree with Kate Stanner's comment, it's my experience that creatives have no respect whatsoever with original thought, it's all fair game.
simon
2009-05-11 12:37:15


this nokia ad
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJY4LZRZ7LM

seems to draw inspiration from 'for all seasons'
http://www.hahakid.net/forallseasons/forallseasons.html

and uvas volume
http://www.uva.co.uk/archives/49
Chris OShea
2009-05-11 13:26:53


it seems like it's happening more than ever right now. do ad creatives think we don't notice? after all, it's popular culture, they haven't searched too far! take that 'honey monsta' sugar puffs ad taking on the mighty boosh song style. the scandal around that obviously hasn't deterred pot noodle taking massive influence from flight of the conchords. get a grip guys, we've seen it and it was better the first time.
schnabz
2009-05-11 14:49:17


Surely you can't forgotten about this one
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t83et2J51Rw
It's like they liked the concept and forced it to fit the advert, why would you have running machines out in a public square anyway?...
(original) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pv5zWaTEVkI
Alex
2009-05-11 15:15:19


this is as close as the ad people - most of them wanna be directors - can get to filmmaking - stealing and plagiarizing
andrea gassi
2009-05-11 15:36:47


I wonder if this whole discussion is not a bit more ambivalent than it is being discussed.

Coming up with any idea, be it in advertising, product design, fine arts or screenwriting will always and has always been dependent on what pictures, experiences and stories creatives carry around in their subconscience. Culture itself has always been reinventing itself over and over again with reference (hidden or not) to earlier cultural artefacts.

Therefore, the moment people put their creative outputs into "culture" (here: youtube), they acknowledge the possibility of it sticking in peoples' brains. Always available for further re-interpretation and re-usage.

This has been done to Hitchcock, Shakespeare and lesser artists. And those have seldomly been rewarded for inspiring others just because a picture, metaphor or storypattern was used in another context.

The content of the internet is culture, so if you don't want to inspire anybody to re-use parts of your ideas/output, keep your stuff on your computer only.

1:1 copying of ideas will and should always be punished (by law or reputation damage). But re-applying parts of others people's output in new context will and should not be punishable.

By the way, did anyone at Fallon complain about dozens of others using "their" gorilla for their own goals?
Nico Westermann
2009-05-11 16:07:01


It's lame that the agencies who do the taking, make little or no mention of the inspiration, yet when the time comes to accept recognition, inflate their strategy and process to the world.

That said, it's seems you get what you deserve if you allow your creative work to play on youtube. It would be better to enter a film competition, have an art show, or develop a personal website to showcase your talent then to just toss it out there at let everyone at it.
zerohero
2009-05-11 17:53:44


Great post i have always saw the links between the aero advertisement and the balloon bowl and also the link between the new visa advert and RJD2’s video. well done for exposing these clear attempts at plagiarism
Daniel
2009-05-13 12:41:36


Great post i have always saw the links between the aero advertisement and the balloon bowl and also the link between the new visa advert and RJD2’s video. well done for exposing these clear attempts at plagiarism
Daniel
2009-05-13 12:42:05


Great post i have always saw the links between the aero advertisement and the balloon bowl and also the link between the new visa advert and RJD2’s video. well done for exposing these clear attempts at plagiarism
Daniel
2009-05-13 12:42:27


all advertising uses art, film or any form of creativity to sell products, they do not care where the original idea comes from. their brief is to sell more product, that is their job.
yes they are good at it, as they manage to sell themselves to the rest of the world as originators, not salespeople..
yes boundaries blur a little, but thats because of the reach that advertising has into society, it has to be affected by it, its in societies face all the time..
its just best not to try and justify what you do… cos your just gonna sound like a dick…
don'ttalk
2009-05-13 12:43:43


@Nico Westerman
“By the way, did anyone at Fallon complain about dozens of others using “their” gorilla for their own goals?”
I think there is a difference between parody/spoof/pastiche and a straight-faced appropriation of an idea. In their very tone, parodies acknowledge their precursor, don’t you think? But elsewhere I’m inclined to agree with you. Reputation damage should punish/deter plagiarism; a few exposes come to light from the same agency and clients might think twice about who they come to. Gossiping has proven evolutionary value, so let’s get to it!
Tom
2009-05-13 12:45:56


“It would be better to enter a film competition, have an art show, or develop a personal website to showcase your talent”
However the same issue could still occur with the ideas being viewed at a show, or on a personal web site. Taking an idea from a show would be easier and less hassle, as the original piece hasn’t had the exposure that You tube offers and therefore no online following to defend the original artist on blogs
Stephen
2009-05-13 12:48:35


What strikes me is how much better the ‘original’ versions generally are (with a couple of possible exceptions.) The charm and immediacy of the execution is usually lost. For example the Aero balloons are seriously crap compared to the precursory blue balloons and miss the point totally. They look contrived, move unconvincingly, don’t burst and their interaction with the skater are all poor against the realism of the Balloon Bowl film. Christ they even copy the cu shot moving through the balloons to less effect.
For me this is the measure of whether any new or ‘inspired’ version has value creatively - does it take the idea anywhere new and develop any fresh characteristics? If it doesn’t, or more worryingly can’t be bothered to try, its just an old fashioned rip off and should be treated as such.
bob chimp
2009-05-13 12:50:37


@Chris O’Shea:
Regarding the Nokia E71 ad you can take my work “appearing disappearance” (2007 for Advanced Beauty) into the list of inspiration which wasn’t developed further substantially:
http://vimeo.com/2801775
What saddens me the most is, that people will think Nokia was first because they show it world-wide and my works is relatively unknown and considered too experimental for the commercial world usually … so it was quite confusing to see this.
My ident for Channel FIVE developed my idea a bit further,
but was designed and animated by myself only and not a huge team:
http://vimeo.com/2444536
Robert Seidel
2009-05-13 12:52:13


HTE BEST SITE EVER ABOUT CREATIVE SUCKERS ! ! ! !

http://www.joelapompe.net/

AMAZING !!!
!!!
2009-05-13 13:56:19


The balloon bowl video was not just some "youtube" video made by some kids... it was an advert for Nike, by Nemo Design.
ryan
2009-05-13 18:54:07


insert coins (student film) VS happyness factory (coca cola)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hYPzq86ruE

tell me what you think
toussek
2009-05-13 20:14:17


The following statement is BS:
"Despite seeing the similarities between the two films, Ramsay still feels they are essentially different."
Does essentially different mean a different camera? But when it comes to the concept, it is the exact same!
Changing the skater and the color of the balloons does not change the concept, which is essentially the same. Just fess up and admit it!

Stealing ideas is nothing new. We are all influenced by other artists ideas, but in this case he should have the integrity to admit it, especially when it is so blatant!
Kyle
2009-05-13 21:03:03


The following statement is BS:
"Despite seeing the similarities between the two films, Ramsay still feels they are essentially different."
Does essentially different mean a different camera? But when it comes to the concept, it is the exact same!
Changing the skater and the color of the balloons does not change the concept, which is essentially the same. Just fess up and admit it!

Stealing ideas is nothing new. We are all influenced by other artists ideas, but in this case he should have the integrity to admit it, especially when it is so blatant!
Kyle
2009-05-13 21:06:37


wow. Is this really a shocker to anyone? Haven't ideas been gleaned from existing culture forever? The fact that this is all more accessible to the mass population, is the only difference. I think by hiring the director and the talent responsible for the idea is a huge step. And how many times has a director pitched an idea to an agency, only to lose the job, and see their idea on screen? The "homages" are now more apparent or obvious, but don't kid yourself that this is anything new.
Credit where credit is due is the right thing, and although we work in a very moral and ethical business, sometimes the millions of other peoples images in your head, come out of your mouth in your words.
It's a very tough business and what is old can be new again. Even if it's only a day old.
Wasssuupp?
Damon Webster
2009-05-14 00:28:53


Seriously.
If you dont want anyone to copy/improve your idea, then dont post it on youTube.
I just had a TV ad I made copied completely by a TV channel as an ident. I dont mind, its a bit flattering if anything. You can be so precious about ideas.

You cant own an idea, especially if you've broad casted it for the whole world to see.
If you dont want anyone to copy it, then dont show it.
its that simple.

No idea is completely original. Every idea you have will be mostly influenced or copied by something or someone, that's inevitable. Deal with it. Embrace it. And most of all - stop crying.
El Gordo
2009-05-14 01:48:17


everbody still griping out this fundamental problem.

The big joke is advertisers don't have any ideas.

All that advertising art directors do all day long is search the blogs

for work. They have too...if they were artists they wouldn't work there.

Their "BIG IDEAS" are when they identify other creative work that would seem appropriate

for the brands they represent. They do that for everything.

I mean usually a creative brief comes with a PDF with screen shots and pics of other things

that inspire them...thats just a standard practice....

They only way to solve the problem is not to show your work..or

just make so much work they cant keep up...you have already moved on to the next thing.

-----
that happiness factory commmercial was SO BORING AND GAY just pointless. its perfect idea for big corporation board rooms..."every one is happy...la la la la la.happy happy" puke..
xpez
2009-05-14 01:58:46


The balloon bowl video was not just some "youtube" video made by some kids... it was an advert for Nike, by Nemo Design.
ryan
2009-05-14 03:34:04


everbody still griping out this fundamental problem.

The big joke is advertisers don't have any ideas.

All that advertising art directors do all day long is search the blogs

for work. They have too...if they were artists they wouldn't work there.

Their "BIG IDEAS" are when they identify other creative work that would seem appropriate

for the brands they represent. They do that for everything.

I mean usually a creative brief comes with a PDF with screen shots and pics of other things

that inspire them...thats just a standard practice....

They only way to solve the problem is not to show your work..or

just make so much work they cant keep up...you have already moved on to the next thing.

-----
that happiness factory commmercial was SO BORING AND GAY just pointless. its perfect idea for big corporation board rooms..."every one is happy...la la la la la.happy happy" puke..
xpez
2009-05-14 03:41:12


Paul Arden's philosophy is interesting; he believes that ideas cannot be possessed, they exist in the "ether" seperate from us and the creative person simply plucks the idea from the ether and uses it. Every creative person knows that there are no new ideas, only new combinations.

Does this imply that the ad men are right to "steal" ideas? I mean Arden was an ad man himself so he might just be covering his own back.

Is "idea theft" synonymous with "inspiration"? I think it could be very closely linked.
Mikrokosmonaut
2009-05-14 11:04:51


It comes down to time and risk. Two factors that unfortunately businesses don’t like affording. It's not that Creatives are incapable of coming up with an original thought (although perhaps there are a few acceptations) it’s that they’re not afforded lots of time and the luxury of experimentation, time to explore and push for new ideas. Such as an artist would have.

The other factor is risk. Putting new ideas out there is always going into the unknown and you don’t know if they'll sink or swim. Sourcing popular content from YouTube and attaching a brand to it is safe for them, because they can already know if people like the content and the idea.

As Paul Arden said, “It’s not about where you get ideas from, it’s about where you take them” and I couldn’t agree more. We all recognise a rip-off when we see one and duly give it no creative credit. But we also know when something has been an inspiration to opening up a new idea altogether. To me they are two very different things, and if any idea is directly lifted from another then surely the originator must be credited. If they are not then the Creatives are only kidding themselves.
Mark
2009-05-14 11:20:52


I like to think that the agency I work at handled a similar case in the best possible way.

When we came across a video that went beautifully with our strategy, we got the young director on board for their first ever ad shoot and made a great piece of video that went on to win awards. Everybody wins.
Rob Mortimer
2009-05-14 13:54:20


This topic is one I feel we will be hearing more and more about, Because its happening every day a lot of people at agency level are seen to be guarding there position to the point where the working environment becomes so un-inspirational and still very demanding so this stealing of peoples ideas is classed as ok.

makes me sick really !
Robertcreage
2009-05-14 14:48:21


The best example of doing it the right way is http://www.wherethehellismatt.com

Stride chewing gum saw Matt's video and paid him to travel around the world and make a longer one, which is awesome.
Iain
2009-05-17 08:33:48


Working in the art department in commercial production, I have always been given artists work or films as examples or direction for commercial scripts.
In the past creatives raided magazines, art journals or feature films and used them as starting points or illustrations for their own scripts or ideas.
Now it has totally changed, everthing is expected instantly, Utube and google images have become such an important tool creatives have got used to presenting things immediately, and reproducing, rather than developing the ideas.
The excuse of pressure and shortage of time is no excuse for some creatives being afraid to put their own original ideas on the line.
It is such a pleasure when you get a script to work on that is obviously something that has come from a team either from their own stuff or by taking an idea much further.
I am fed up with being sent stuff along with a url to someones work that is to be ripped off.
alex
2009-05-18 12:41:05


Gotta agree that the video of the blue balloons has so much more charm, and surely that is the thing you would have wanted to keep for any ad. Oops.
Benjamin
2009-05-18 21:01:47


The Internet is also an great platform for proscribing these ad agencies who making a living by constantly steals ideas from others.

These years plagiarism-award goes to...
Jan
2009-05-19 12:53:58


we had a similiar experience here is our film

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALqiTAwyflo

then the commercial I actually auditioned for as the genie again but didnt get anything from

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwWCXVb6bSc
dave
2009-05-29 19:43:01


The finger of blame here is being pointed solely at advertising agencies. And while it is certainly right to suggest that agencies should develop a better code of conduct regarding the appropriation of other people's ideas, it is also worth noting that directors are no better behaved:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0xCdfIzZwU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R90DtKtd0mU

Regarding directors having their ideas stolen - if that idea is used commercially it seems to be protected, another chocolate company couldn't have simply remade Gorilla with their own branding. So why is this not also the case with non-commercial films? And perhaps a solution is for directors/artists who believe they may be about to be ripped off to sell their idea to a rival cheaply. Ensuring the thieves are left out of pocket with eggy faces and credit is given where due.
morgan
2009-07-08 16:54:28


The finger, as Morgan puts it, could be pointed in many directions, of course the only issues arise when someone is making a profit from the ideas rather than being concerned solely about the loss of recognition. At least that is how I see it in most cases? Perhaps I am wrong but if nobody makes any money then it seems stealing ideas and concepts is a pretty common event it is not until there is money involved that it becomes something that is more widely discussed?
Adirec Torytski
2009-07-27 09:14:50


El Gordo says:
"You cant own an idea, especially if you've broad casted it for the whole world to see.
If you dont want anyone to copy it, then dont show it.
its that simple."

You obviously are missing the point here. There will always be a thin line between inspiration and pinching. But the whole article focuses on creative and innovative ideas by unknown directors being totally ripped off by big agencies that charge a lot of money to a clients that spends huge amounts for the creativity that agency offers. It is definitely not the same to get inspired by someone else's work than doing a 1:1 copy from a youtube video.

You might be one of those who don't care about creativity, about art, about ideas, or about exposure of your work or about the right to have your ideas protected form someone else making profit from them.

Some other examples of directo copies can be found here:

http://youthoughtwewouldntnotice.com/
nd
2009-07-27 11:57:19


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