Mexican skaters burn for Burn’s new campaign

Publicis Mojo, Sydney, in collaboration with production company Exit Films, has just released three short films, Ride, Playground, and Peepshow, to kick off a new integrated campaign for Coca Cola’s energy drink, Burn. Each film showcases the talents of real-life characters from the skate, music and snowboarding communities – and there isn’t a ‘drink this to make you awesome’ claim anywhere to be seen…

Publicis Mojo, Sydney, in collaboration with production company Exit Films, has just released three short films, Ride, Playground, and Peepshow, to kick off a new integrated campaign for Coca Cola’s energy drink, Burn. Each film showcases the talents of real-life characters from the skate, music and snowboarding communities – and there isn’t a ‘drink this to make you awesome’ claim anywhere to be seen…

Ride, directed by Garth Davis in Mexico City shows a group of skateboarders who leave flaming trails in their wake. The skateboarders were actually set on fire during the shoot. We’re assured that none were injured!

The other two films are more straight-up documentaries. Directed by Jonathan Hill, Peepshow follows the exploits of a group of young female snowboarders determined to develop and show off their skills – no matter how much falling off and crashing might hurt:

And Playground, directed by Glendyn Ivin, focuses on a young Philadelphia rapper who’s speciality is creating beats by hitting and beating objects around him – desks, street signs, bins, pipes – literally anything he can hit to make a sound…

“The crux of our approach was to involve pre-existing communities in the creation and distribution of the key campaign assets –rather than the brand launching it on its own’, explains Micah Walker, executive creative director of Mojo Sydney. “Burn’s most influential audience are in large part creators themselves – performers, writers, documenters, editors and publishers within the communities we want to communicate with – so it was critical our films were the kinds of things they could appreciate. They had to be fresh.”

CREDITS

Agency: Publicis Mojo, Sydney
Chief creative officer: Craig Davis
Executive creative director: Micah Walker
Creatives: Ian Williamson, Andrew Ostrom, Ruth Bellotti, Kirsty Gavin
Production: Pip Smart, Corey Esse, Ali Dunlop, Lisa Vermaak
Strategy: Graham Ritchie, Simone Ellis, Will Davie
Client Service: Simon Ludowyke 
Production company: Exit Films, Melbourne
Music Supervisor: Karl Richter at Level 2 Music
Sound mix: Jason Murphy at GAS
Digital Partner: The Rumpus Room
Creative Technical Director: Tomas Roope
Production: Steve Wyles
Lead Developer: Kentaro Yamada
Social Media Strategy: Jessica MacCormick

RIDE
Director: Garth Davis
Producer: Karen Sproul
Editor: Jack Hutchings at The Butchery
DOP: Grieg Fraser
VFX: Colin Renshaw, Cutting Edge

PEEPSHOW
Director/DOP: Jonathan Hill
Producer: Allison Lockwood
Exec producers: Garth Davis and Karen Sproul
Editor: Rohan Zerna at The Butchery

PLAYGROUND
Director/DOP: Glendyn Ivin
Producer: Allison Lockwood
Exec producers: Garth Davis and Karen Sproul
Editor: Peter Scriberras at The Butchery

  • These are beautiful, interesting films. I can’t help thinking that the ‘scenes’ that Coca Cola are trying to latch on to are too smart and too cynical to buy into a giant corporation claiming to be down with the kids – albeit in a very surreptitious way. The web makes it impossible for them to hide their involvement. It’s almost a shame that they are involved…

  • I love the images, not sure about actually setting fire to the skateboarders in the video. I think CGI flames would of given better and more dramatic footage. Being able to control the flames could of worked in their favour and given off less smoke. Then again its all about the danger!

  • Again and again and again and again.

  • alex

    I think the majority of people within the skateboarding, snowboarding and hip hop communities will see straight through such overly financed nonsense. The majority of skate video edits and final cuts blow the balls off of all of those productions.

    Super contrived and overtly corporate is how i would describe both the concept and the outcomes…

  • newman

    WTF. Beyond contrived.

    Have some balls.

  • Are all the flames real? Surely setting that many people on fire at least one of them would have got injured.

  • Arthur

    This is crap. Maybe one day that Agency will have talent. Because they don’t.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQ-Y78I8wmk

    The skate video “hot chocolate” was made in 2004… Good stealing guys.

  • I really enjoyed the skateboarding piece, though it’s frustrating not knowing how much of it is real. Surely the jump between the two roof tops at 2:07 isn’t real?! Some clarity would be much appreciated.

    The whole piece is also very similar to the ‘Fully Flared’ skateboarding video intro, directed by Spike Jones – which is truly a beautiful piece of film:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VGbAOOEego

  • Jo

    reminds me of the “Supersonic Me” video – from 2:30 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQw-wnFlmFk

  • Kermit

    “I love haters” says the rapper’s friend’s t-shirt. If it didn’t say coke you’d be jizzing your pants about the skate video

  • I find these much more exciting than a cheap viral. It’s wonderful how strong a narrative can be within a 3 minute piece. Proper film-making.

  • Bookmarked ! short film can be a hit and a miss, but I am liking these, glad I found it :)