New York Sleeps

A new exhibition of photographs by Christopher Thomas, which opens at the Wapping Project Bankside in London tonight, reveals that the city that supposedly never sleeps does in fact have the odd moment of repose…

Grand Central Terminal II, 2008

A new exhibition of photographs by Christopher Thomas, which opens at the Wapping Project Bankside in London tonight, reveals that the city that supposedly never sleeps does in fact have the odd moment of repose…

Thomas’s New York series was shot over several years using a custom-made large format camera, and offers up an unusual portrait of the city, a chance to view some of its most iconic buildings without the typical hustle and bustle of people flowing through them.

Radio City Music Hall, 2009

Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, 2009

The effect of witnessing these familiar places in such stillness is a little disquieting but mostly feels a rare treat. Somewhat remarkably, Thomas hasn’t employed any trickery to capture them empty of people – he simply got there very early in the morning.

Grand Central Terminal 1, 2008

Brooklyn Bridge II, 2001

New York Sleeps opens tonight at the Wapping Project Bankside, and will remain on view until February 26. More info is at thewappingprojectbankside.com.

 

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  • Gorgeous! The large format of the camera, plus the expertise of the artist are more than evident. Are they for sale?

  • Stunning.

    I’ve always loved shots with no people whatsoever and I often try to achieve the same thing with my own photography. There’s usually a lot of standing around with camera on face waiting for the right moment!

    These images have an ethereal quality in their absolute stillness; an alternate reality where time stands still that’s very appealing. The world momentarily becomes a movie set between takes. For a second you’re the star of ‘I am Legend’ or ’28 Days/Months Later’.

  • Simply beautiful.

  • The city that never sleeps, actually does ???? LOL !!!
    Thank you for that beautiful pictures.

  • Stephen McDonald

    Briliant set of photographs, love them all but especially Grand Central Terminal II, 2008 and Brooklyn Bridge II, 2001.

  • All depends on the eyes of the photographer. Classy pictures I must say.

  • Love these! Great to see a unique side of NYC at peace… Great job Christopher!

  • amazing images, a great job!

  • Wow, these images have such a ethereal quality about them. I can’t imagine anyone being able to capture Mumbai like this though.

  • Loving these images – really surreal, such familar places that I associate with crowds of people and movement, stripped down bare. My only criticism is the negative border – i don’t like them, probably a personal thing :-)

  • Britta Perry

    Photography is the art of opportunity – and having the patience and knowledge to be there when it is likely to strike. Fantastic photos of our sometimes lovely city.

  • I thought I I’d never see NY with anyone in their streets. Thanks for this.

    Fessols&naps

  • jim watters

    love the shots chris, nice dynamic images. love the frames, certainly adds to the images
    the polaroid one wrapped around the City Music hall is stunning.

    jim (photographer)

  • the pics are beautiful.
    and the chance of witnessing nyc without all the movement is breathtaking.

  • Simply beautiful

  • What a great set of images, love the one with the bridge, nice to see the city so empty.

  • florin

    sorry to break it to you guys, but he might have used a really long exposure, powered by an extreme ND filter that reduces light 10 times during the day. Or it could have been xmas morning or ny day, or a really lucky situation :p

  • florin if you look at the flags you will see that they are not blurred. an indication of log exposure.