CR Blog

House Industries' Photolettering app

Digital, Photography, Type / Typography

Posted by Gavin Lucas, 13 March 2013, 17:30    Permalink    Comments (2)

Delaware font foundry House Industries has just released a new iPhone app that enables users to easily customise photos with a range of its display typefaces…

The app works as a rather nifty promotional tool for the display typeface setting service offered by House Industries' Photolettering service – which is essentially a digital-age revival of the old (pre-desktop publishing) Photo-Lettering service that utilised photographic technology in the production of commercial typography and lettering for ad agencies and publishing houses.

Rather wonderfully, the free app's name, whilst referencing the Photolettering service, also explains succinctly what the app does: it allows users to add lettering to their photos. Here's how it works:

First take a picture with your phone or import one from your camera roll, scale, rotate or crop your image as you wish before selecting a lettering style from HI's Photolettering collection of original fonts.

Type your message, then rotate, scale and colour the text as you please so it appears how you want before sharing or saving your image.

As well as having the option to share your image via email, text message, Instagram or Twitter, there's also an option to send a printed 4x6inch postcard version of your lovingly lettered photos anywhere in the world. It's intuitive and fun to use - and it does a great job of showcasing precisely what Photolettering is all about. Bravo!

The app itself is free to download and while it comes loaded three fun display fonts to use, an extra 18 or so typefaces can be bought for 69p a pop. Find it on iTunes.

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2 Comments

Brilliant. Love it. There are a couple of apps that operate in the type of photo thing, but this one takes it to the next level. Thanks for sharing.
Felipe
2013-03-13 18:53:15


perfect for putting inspirational messages over heavily filtered pictures of mountains or beaches then putting them on Tumblr


(i've just downloaded it ; )
badger
2013-03-14 11:37:56


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