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What would a UK flag look like without Scotland?

Graphic Design

Posted by Quentin Newark and Kevin Denoual, 28 August 2014, 11:03    Permalink    Comments (48)

On September 18, Scotland will hold a vote on independence which could herald the break-up of the UK as we know it. If the Scots vote yes, will the UK need a new flag? If so, what would it look like? Atelier Works' Quentin Newark and Kevin Denoual have some suggestions

If the vote for independence is successful, we will no longer be a United Kingdom, they write. Although the legal position is unclear, the worst aspect of this may be that we can no longer legally be known as such, so if there is no immediate back-up idea, just like the Former Yugoslavia, we might become the Former United Kingdom. Or fUK.

And it is possible that the Union Flag of the UK, created in 1707, to symbolise the "United Kingdom of Great Britain" will have to go.

 

The Union Jack (above), as the flag is colloquially known, is an amalgam of the flags of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland. In the sequence we show here: Scotland's saltire of St Andrew, England's cross of St George, and Northern Ireland's saltire of St Patrick. Wales ... simply doesn't exist. The two saltires have been made thinner so they don't cancel one another out, hence all that geometric complexity.

 


Although David Cameron calls the UK "countries within a country" the countries are not equal. England is a kingdom, Wales was a Principality, with Prince Charles as its Prince [In 2012 the ISO officially redesignated Wales as a country], and Northern Ireland is described variously as a "province" and a "territory". Somehow Wales fails to appear in any form on the flag, Ireland gets thinned out, and Scotland trumped by the big red cross of St George. Back in 1707, the other kingdom, Scotland was profoundly unhappy, and produced their own design with the white saltire dominant, which they cleverly wanted to use north of the border.

 


This issue of dominance is an old issue, it's interesting to look at the sketches of the Earl of Nottingham, four hundred year old design ideas, trying to reconcile two crosses (always with the red dominant), dating as early as 1604, a hundred years before the Union Jack, when James I first wanted to unite Scotland and England.

 


There is another interesting effort of amalgamation, dating from 1653, when Britain had no King. Much like France, which needed a new flag when it rid itself of King Louis XVI in 1793, Oliver Cromwell wanted the Commonwealth to have a new start. (That wonderful word Commonwealth, with its prototypical egalitarian implications, dates from this time.) The lion in the centre is Oliver Cromwell's own coat of arms ... he went on to act almost as a king, even being succeeded as Lord Protector by his son Richard Cromwell, who by all accounts was not what his father was, and fell from power, being known ever after as "Tumble-down Dick".

 


At last the point of this post: a piece of thinking about what the design of the new flag replacing the Union Jack could be.

We aren't the first. There is some background and some ideas on The Guardian site. And if your interest is really peeked, googling will reveal more. (But I doubt anyone has been as thorough as us.)


We have, in reverse order of popularity here in the studio, five potential designs for the fUK (Former United Kingdom).


Design one: Three countries in one

The simplest - and least imaginative - solution to Scotland disuniting, is simply to lift the saltire of St Andrew out of the flag. So just two red crosses. Quite nice. But wait, where is Wales? Where was Wales in the Union Jack? Why didn't they have an alternative version of the Union Jack that they presented to Queen Anne in 1707?


Our first design uses the cross of St George, and adds emblems from the flags of Northern Ireland and Wales. (The Red Hand of Ulster [dates back into the mists of time] and the Red Dragon of Wales [dates back to at least 800AD].) The great advantage of this flag is that for the first time, it represents the actual number of countries. Three. Wales gets a showing.

 


Design two: Joining Napoleon's Europe

As he conquered countries, Napoleon replaced their 'old' flags with the new tricolore. Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy... I imagine he had a plan to reflag all of Europe. Several countries in Europe have subsequently adopted a tricolore.

Napoleon didn't design the tricolore, though. He just brought it unequivocal prominence as France's only flag.

 

Somehow a whole crop of countries have gone for the horizontal tricolore. Starting with the Netherlands. Perhaps its a Protestant or Teutonic thing. (And those countries under Teutonic influence.) Loving the modernity, the simplicity, but not wanting to pay any acknowledgement to Catholic France.


For the purposes of our messianic redesign project, we have brought these horizontal deviants into the vertical fold.

So, proposal two is: do what works. We have the logical internationally agreed units of measurement, the metre, the kilogram, we comply in all significant areas with shipping and flight paths, currency valuations, contract terminology, interlocking legal codes, lets add one more area of interconnectedness: our flag.

There is also the neatness that the tricolore is three bands of colour, one for each of the fUK's three countries.

Three countries, three colours: red for England, green for Wales, red for Northern Ireland


Design three: Three lions

The three lions has been an emblem for England for a thousand years. It began in France. (Don't tell the Daily Mail.) In the deep middle ages, a set of lions was the heraldic symbol for the Counts of Anjou - the numbers of lions varied, sometimes four, sometimes six, probably according to what they were displayed on, more space, more lions. Here is an image of Geoffrey Plantagenet, who married King Henry of England's daughter, Matilda. Through convolutions too lengthy to ever remember, his son became Henry II, King of England and the Plantagenet family with their crest of lions came to rule England (and Wales) and some of the time Scotland for three hundred years.

It is already used as the "royal banner of England" (pic source here).

Our proposal is the the flag come to represent the fUK. The Irish and Welsh are (presumably) happy to be known as the British Lions when it comes to rugby - the Lions is the team with players from each of the countries within Great Britain. Could they be happy to be one of the metaphorical lions on a new flag? We think this solution particularly suits British pugnacity - our willingness to fight with anyone, anywhere. Drunk or sober.


Design four: The white cliffs of Dover

The white cliffs of Dover were used in their campaign for the recent European elections by the maverick political party UKIP, as a symbol of all that is most precious to our "country".

(There are exactly matching white cliffs of Normandy too. No one plonked in front of them could tell them apart, they are made of the same chalk.)

Our fourth design is a flag based on the white cliffs - the bit of Britain that faces out towards the 'rest of the world'.


This version was chosen by the designer here in the studio who drew it, Kevin, who is French, because it looks like Britain seen from France.


Design five: Rose Rising

More history.

A word on flags, countries, and history. I think you ignore history at your peril. People need to feel that their flag represents something communal that they can (literally) look up to. Something that represents an essence of the history and relationships that they share with their fellow countrymen, something that can be shared even with their ancestors. Something that has been dug out of the shared nationality like the most concentrated diamond.

Not something that has just sprung from an artist's or designer's capricious imagination, and can only be understood in terms of that individual. Flags are about what is common. In the wonderful word of Oliver Cromwell's era: the Commonwealth.

Even a very modern flag design like the tricolore, which is so reductive and timeless it is simply three colours, is explained with reference to what the colours represent, deep strains of French culture.

So.

If the Tudor Rose is unfamiliar to you, read here. It's been a potent symbol of Britain for five hundred years. Long enough for its association with one particular family to be forgotten. What most people fail to realise is that it is actually two roses combined, a white fused with a red. It is a symbol of unity. Of two opposing sides, being at peace and united.


We love the fact that the symbol seems to cover so many aspects of the fUK.

It represents:
- unity: people of opposing views happily living alongside one another
- the fruitfulness of the British Isles: the verdance, the countryside, the gardens
- did we mention gardens: Britain's favourite activity
- the meandering, wiggly, organic paths that human lives and human interaction takes
- growth
- different petals, but one shared heart
- the cycle of life: constant renewal

 


We think this says so much more than something so reductive like the tricolore, which can only be about the association of colours. (Kevin agrees.) With the rose we get colours, and we get symbolism that works for the past, and the future. Whether it is rendered with more drawing and more detail, or flat and graphically, we aren't sure. Beautiful, memorable, unique in the world of flags.

It makes us feel slightly better about living in the fUK.

 

This post was originally published on the Atelier Works blog and is reproduced by permission.

48 Comments

Nice post and interesting ideas. I think I prefer the simplicity of the flag without the St Andrew's satire... But would be nice to see a combination of this with an element the welsh flag in...

Just thought I'd best point out the typo you've got between the tudor roses images (the line that starts with 'We love the fact that the symbol...')

You'll know it when you see it!
Tom
2014-08-28 12:45:37


Oh dear....oh, oh dear.

Scotland, please stay!
you might like
2014-08-28 12:53:26


This is a nice exercise, but I'm not sure there's any need for it to change. The US flag recognises two historical periods in one – the original 13 States and the current 50. Scotland's been part of the UK for hundreds of year, we dismiss that history?
Richard
2014-08-28 13:20:18


May I be the first to say: 'fried egg' ;)
zuko
2014-08-28 13:36:27


Interesting article. Love a flag.

There is another way the Welsh flag could be included. In such that the flag of St.David (patron saint of Wales) is black with a yellow cross. Maybe yellow could be the colour of Wales as it also links with their national flower, the daffodil? Another tricolore perhaps, though the aesthetic looks quite ubiquitous?
Also red, yellow, red in any combination is probably too spanish.
The saltire is really quite unique, It would be a massive shift to get rid of that shape and the triangles it creates, entirely.

I'm going to think about this more.

On a side note, a change in the Union flag would also result in a change in a lot of territories changing their flags, not to mention Australia and New Zealand. Though New Zealand are considering changing their flag altogether to get rid of the 'British' colonial aspect.

Maybe Scotland should pay the governments of all the territories it would affect the total cost to remake all their flags? Dig into that oil fun a little?
Rob
2014-08-28 14:13:14


Can't we just use the Welsh flag?

Come on, it has a DRAGON on it
Alex
2014-08-28 14:59:13


I like this... I wonder if there's a way we can submit our own designs somewhere.
James
2014-08-28 15:55:56


Be careful to remember that the Union Jack is only the Union Jack when it is on a ship - otherwise it is the Union Flag
Stephen
2014-08-28 16:02:36


Wales ISN'T a principality. It's a country.
Owen
2014-08-28 16:57:58


Excellent informative article regarding the explanation for the flag. Living on the other side of the pond, I had no idea that the flag was three in one. If Scotland leaves, then perhaps that would be a chance to add Wales?
DC
2014-08-29 13:00:56


I think the point is moot. Scotland is not going to vote for independence.
Robert
2014-08-29 13:08:34


Interesting choice of URL for this post...

(http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/what-the-fuk)
James Thomas
2014-08-29 15:42:20


interesting url... http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/what-the-fuk
Dave
2014-08-29 15:42:27


Could the typo pointed out by Tom prove to be the perfect documentary on what is about to happen?!

I like the white cliffs of Dover idea – it's a nice way to include Wales, but does ignore Northern Ireland.

Maybe make the sky a little less dour and cloudy though?
Andi
2014-08-29 16:23:08


@ Andi

It's not a typo - Quentin suggests in the piece that the country may have to be known henceforth as the Former United Kingdom, or fUK

@ Dave, James
What the fUK (as in Former United Kingdom) was Quentin's original title for the post on the Atelier Works site and it seemed fun to keep it for the URL on this one.
CR PatrickBurgoyne
2014-08-29 16:27:07


Yep bacon and eggs.
Tim
2014-08-30 01:38:08


Nice post.Just some thoughts, great minds i was musing this on the bus to work.
1. Replace the blue of scotland with the green of wales.
2. Having just had the commonwealth games should we get rid of the union flag and have a new commomwealth flag to replace it? Would thst be more rainbow reflective of multicultural, multi-sexual tolerant Britain, (dont like Fuk) UK

Just thought id throw these in
adboy45
2014-08-30 15:54:59


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:CushNewUnionJack.svg

I propose this.
Maintaining the English and Irish crosses and adding green for Wales.
Steve
2014-08-30 18:43:47


Good proposas (maybe some a toot much imaginative)

In Spain they do not have your problems. After they conquered its current eastern regions they simple downgraded catalan flag to 'regional' status.

In case of indepence catalans simply need to re-upgrade its flag to national flag.

While Spanish can continue with its flag. Well- ,any of them - with king's shield, or with fascists' eagle or with purple color. Every few decades they change it a bit. To identify - I guess- who is the big boss then .

Also I will like to make a new proposal. My objective is to maintain current 3 colors while also identifying component nations:
Saint George Cross on Blue. In each canton 9 pointed white star. Maintainging a common style with other commonwealth flags.

On this way you will have 4 star, one for each nation (Ireland, Wales, Cornwall and England). And 9 pointed because New Zealand have them 5 pointed and Australia 7 pointed. Another -more epic- reason to have 9 pointed star can be relate it to its 9 regions in Arthur times.
MSR
2014-08-31 21:37:58


My favorite one is the one with the fried egg in the centre. But... where's the bacon gone? #cholesterolemblem
HiThere
2014-08-31 22:40:14


How's about this?

Switch Scotland for Wales. Easy.

http://postimg.org/image/k26mdmvzf/
Ed
2014-09-01 15:53:34


Sorry to be pedantic, but I just wanted to point out that the Irish are not happy to be called the British Lions. That's why the correct name for the rugby team is in fact the British and Irish Lions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_and_Irish_Lions
CouldYouGuessImIrish
2014-09-01 15:59:38


The idea of simply making the Scottish blue saltire green for Wales is genius – I completely agree. Great solution. Same design, just a colour change.

"CouldYouGuessImIrish" raises an interesting issue for the future: Irish unification, and the disappearance of the completely invented saltire of St Andrew from the Union Jack. Down to just two then, Wales and England. Wales would HAVE to get a showing then.

Stephen: good luck with you vexillogical pendantry. You are right of course, but Jack sounds much better. Wiki says "also known as".

Andi: "sky a little less dour and cloudy"?? Look up.

Rose = bacon and eggs. Yes. What is more British? The essence of Britishness the world over!!! Flagpole as the chain of sausages?

Owen: "Wales ISN'T a principality. It's a country." I apologise unreservedly. I want the Welsh to be whatever they want to be. I was just using descriptions I came across, which described Wales as a principality – with the Prince of Wales – a portion of England. Hence it's omission from the current Union Jack... but things, as in Scotland, are changing: http://tinyurl.com/papg79g
Quentin
2014-09-02 19:09:28


Wow
This is incredible. What I thought would be a nice design article has me questioning the nature of belonging.
I am Scottish, with half English blood and a Welsh husband living in London. This article has provided a great insight into what it would mean if Scotland left the UK. Questions - Would britain still be Great?
Will England, Wales and Northern Ireland still be the UK?
I feel all Scottish all of a sudden. If we leave, I and am with Kevin's.
Everyone in the current UK should read it.

NUK ok.
Ruth
2014-09-03 11:06:41


"The Irish and Welsh are (presumably) happy to be known as the British Lions when it comes to rugby". I know nothing about rugby and even I know that it's the British and Irish Lions. Even before independence, it was the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
Ciarán
2014-09-03 14:14:25


I think the blue should be replaced by black to indicate the absence of Scotland.
Scotland as England are the main countries of the United Kingdom so the only color that can come in place of the blue is black, indicating the absence of one of the two key countries.
Thom Greek
2014-09-04 06:40:41


Living in the United States, I had no idea that the flag of the United Kingdom was really three in one. If Scotland leaves I believe it would be a great opptunity to add Wales and combine the past and present of the countries through a new concept.

After looking at the five different designs and reading the meanings behind each concept, I thought it would be super unique to combine designs four and five. I would suggest combining the flag that is situated directly below the White Cliffs of Dover photograph with the finished Tudor Rose placed in the center. This new flag would set itself apart from other countries and give the “Former United Kingdom” a new flare.

The White Cliffs of Dover provides several symbolic values for Britain. The color white could represent the first and last sight of England’s travellers that crossed the English Channel, the grey-blue represents the Cliffs themselves, which provided a guard/barrier through invasion, and the dark blue representing the water of the English Channel, which is where the cliffs are situated facing Continental Europe.

The Tudor Rose’s overall all meaning is the unified combination of two families but, it can also take another meaning. The yellow could represent Wales’ national flower, the daffodil like Rob mentioned then the red would represent Saint Patrick’s Saltire of Northern Ireland and the blues for the Cliffs of Dover would represent England.

In conclusion, if Scotland did decide to leave I believe my ideas could be created into another contender for the flag. But, if the “Former United Kingdom” didn’t want to step too far out of its comfort zone then I believe replacing the blue of Scotland’s saltire of Saint Andrew with green for Wales would be simple and work one hundred percent.

Here is a picture of what I was suggesting
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/535858055636695567/
Kaitlyn Keating
2014-09-04 06:42:59


Interesting post, on top of that, I still think the current flag of UK is the best-designed one compared to the protoptype flags . When taking out the flag of Scotland, the flag lacks the balance. So, I hope Scotland agrees to stay....
Ringo York
2014-09-04 09:08:06


The red-green-red flag breaks the English rules of heraldry and flag design, in that you have three colours that are not separated by a metal. To solve this you could have Red-white-green, green-white-red or have red-green-red separated by thin bands of white. White works because it's also a colour of England.
Dan
2014-09-05 10:10:01


Nice work. I agree with Tim, bacon and eggs... nice!
Urkodan
2014-09-05 13:48:56


I would just fade the blue to a lighter shade representing the 50% ish of scots who will NOT have voted to leave...
eleanor pletts
2014-09-08 10:41:27


love to see how the flag came about. As an american never knew about that.
Marielaina Perrone DDS
2014-09-09 18:25:08


There are some nice ideas and reasoning here.

I do think that a new UK flag ought to visibly include Wales. The St George flag with red hand of Ulster and red dragon of Wales does look quite smart and convincing, but does not have the 'wow' of the current flag. The three lions has a decent look but I'm not sure the Welsh and Northern Irish would buy into it. The White Cliffs of Dover idea is okay but it makes for a modestly stylish flag rather than a bold, proud one, and if we do become a smaller United Kingdom I don't (personally) want us to meekly reflect that with a paler, frailer symbol, but rather come back fighting.

The Tudor rose is surprisingly good. It includes the colours of the constituent nations, and the Tudors were originally Welsh while the English are familiar with that rose as 'theirs' too, so that would depend on the Northern Irish finding it acceptable. The symbolism is credible too. I think it would make a very good flag, elegant but strong and unmistakeably our own.

I'm split between that and keeping the current union flag design and simply switching Scottish blue for Welsh green. That would also look very strong, and I think we would get used to it soon enough. Each member country ought to be happy with that. The union flag design, even in black and white, is one of the best, most recognisable and impressive in the world. Even if we lose Scotland, it is fair enough to still want an excellent flag.

I just incline to a red white and green union flag over the Tudor flag, but I think either would be very satisfactory, and in time really loved. Anyway, thanks for a really good article.
Lamia
2014-09-10 01:33:34


I like the tricolor, but would suggest it horizontal with the tudor rose on top

Dan
Dan
2014-09-10 15:11:11


There are some nice ideas and reasoning here.

I do think that a new UK flag ought to visibly include Wales. The St George flag with red hand of Ulster and red dragon of Wales does look quite smart and convincing, but does not have the 'wow' of the current flag. The three lions has a decent look but I'm not sure the Welsh and Northern Irish would buy into it. The White Cliffs of Dover idea is okay but it makes for a modestly stylish flag rather than a bold, proud one, and if we do become a smaller United Kingdom I don't (personally) want us to meekly reflect that with a paler, frailer symbol, but rather come back fighting.

The Tudor rose is surprisingly good. It includes the colours of the constituent nations, and the Tudors were originally Welsh while the English are familiar with that rose as 'theirs' too, so that would depend on the Northern Irish finding it acceptable. The symbolism is credible too. I think it would make a very good flag, elegant but strong and unmistakeably our own.

I'm split between that and keeping the current union flag design and simply switching Scottish blue for Welsh green. That would also look very strong, and I think we would get used to it soon enough. Each member country ought to be happy with that. The union flag design, even in black and white, is one of the best, most recognisable and impressive in the world. Even if we lose Scotland, it is fair enough to still want an excellent flag.

I just incline to a red white and green union flag over the Tudor flag, but I think either would be very satisfactory, and in time really loved. Anyway, thanks for a really good article.
Lamia
2014-09-10 16:34:13


My aunt knitted me a digital cardigan for my 30th. Itched like hell..!
Martin Varesio
2014-09-10 21:30:08


How do the White Cliffs of Dover (being in England) represent Britain? Why not the black of the basalt of the Giants' Causeway, while we're at it? And the red hand of Ulster is intricately tied up with connotations of Unionist ideology for the nationalist community of Northern Ireland. As we move into a new era in NI politics this would be a disappointing choice for many. The casual ignorance and Anglo-centrism that runs through this article, fascinating as it is, is one of the reasons that the Scottish want to leave. Its like the way the BBC redesigned their weather map to pan across the UK but always from a vantage point that viewed London as 'home'.
Una
2014-09-11 11:22:56


Piqued!
Morkle
2014-09-12 08:18:03


Piqued!
Morkle
2014-09-12 11:14:06


This is my take:

http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/255/e/7/new_united_kingdom_flag_by_odanan-d7yvjaz.jpg
Fernando
2014-09-12 13:15:43


Well at least you've been creative rather than just mixing up the various flags.

the designs look good. but that will not help find a new flag.

the tudor rose is not northern irish and there are only tentative link with Henry VIII and wales.
the white cliffs are in england only!!
the lions I like...but they are not dragons.

http://the5krunner.com/2014/02/23/new-british-flag-without-scotland/

don't forget. the original/current one is a bit rubbish really, it's just that we are very used to it.
the5krunner
2014-09-15 12:31:42


I think if Scotland splits, they should just remove the blue and St. Andrew's Cross and have St. George's Cross, St. Patrick's Cross and either a Green Cross for Wales or a quadrant flag with St. George's Cross on the Upper left and lower right and the the Upper right be St. Patrick's Cross and the lower left the Flag of Wales. Either way I think if Scotland splits for the UK, it is a great chance to add representation for Wales. The Red Hand of Ulster shouldn't be used on the UK flag as they only have 6 if Ulster's 9 counties. St. Patrick's Cross is the only good symbol for the UK to use for Northern Ireland as the Harp is usually affiliated with the Republic of Ireland.
Boyee
2014-09-15 18:38:03


why do english symbols always get to overshadow the others' ??
pierre
2014-09-16 16:38:14


The Commonwealth countries have got the Union Jack in their flags. Would they have to change their flags too?
Emilio
2014-09-17 10:06:11


i know this is about the union flag, but i really would like to see Wales represented. even if the Scottish saltire doesnt get removed, why cant we have Wales on there anyway??
kelly
2014-09-18 23:31:00


I think someone should have proof-read this:



. (Don't tell the Daily Mail.)



The bracket should have not been preceded by a full stop and the first letter of "Don't" should not been capitalised. I'm not saying i'm perfect but this is just a bit too sloppy.



mb
2014-09-19 15:56:00


Well, when the ungrateful Norwegians broke up the United Kingdom of Sweden and Norway in 1905, there wasn't this problem, as the union was represented in only one quadrant of the flag of each country, like it is in the British naval ensign. It was a messy design, known as the "herring salad," with triangles in Swedish colors coming in from the left and right and similar ones in the Norwegian red, white and blue from the top and bottom. Post-break-up, Sweden and Norway simply removed the union mark from their respective flags.
Jonas Bjork
2014-09-22 06:18:20


James of Scots who inherited England, championed the idea of Britain and had the flag created, was an educated and creative man. There are many reason why, which presumably he encountered, the Union Flag works in the form that transpired yet fails in other configurations. Much as some would like us to believe it has nothing to do with politics and everything to do with art.

The Union Flag has the blue of St Andrew as the predominant background colour. It strips away the white background of St George and replaces much of it with the blue background of St Andrew. Instead the red cross of St George simply has a white border strip. If instead you removed the blue background of St Andrew and replaced that with a blue border it looks far less like a flag of St Andrew than it does currently on the Union Flag. Invariably, when people try to depict the Saltire over the cross of St George they unfairly omit to also swap the backgrounds over.

When only reversing the crosses so that the flag of St Andrew including it's background is predominant it gives disproportionately more prominence to the flag of St Andrew than to the flag of St George. However if you therefore reverse the entire design 'fairly' by swapping over the backgrounds (as well as the crosses), then neither flag looks quite right and neither is instantly recognisable.

The diagonal appears as a hollow stripe with blue edges. Also, diagonal cross lines are a fair bit longer than perpendicular cross lines therefore what remains of the red cross is then minimal compared to the amount of Saltire exposed in the current Union Flag. Also that necessitates red abutting blue which looks less favourable to the eye than the current flag, especially as a truly great design should stand up in black and white.

In reversing the Union Flag design, neither contributing flag looks as it should and they both lose their unique impact and visual power. The integrity of both is corrupted beyond merely devaluing the aesthetics of the overall flag. The resulting design resembles a rather hollow and weak looking negative of the Confederate Flag, or four little arrows pointing in, on a mainly white background.

Once the flag of St Patrick is then added, it becomes thin stripes of blue / white / red / blue, and looks like someone has drawn a cross with a tube of multi coloured toothpaste, with further odd thick red pointy blobs at the edges. The diagonal red stripe also obliterates any tiny sense of a St Andrews Cross which the eye might possibly have registered without it.

The Union Flag instigated by the father of Britain, King James of Scots, is one of the greatest designs on Earth. A glance shows you a great sense of each contributing flag. It gives prominence to both the blue background and the red cross but the sense of the white cross is immediate and all nations can be proud. My only reservation is the lack of a Welsh dragon. However I consider we all OWN the Union Flag and that it is now as much Welsh as it is English, Irish or Scottish. All parts of the UK were once a multitude nations from the west of England to the North of Scotland and much fighting ensued. Now we are largely together on these islands, the mighty clan, in dust blood and soul. The flag 'is' all of us!
Mark
2014-10-02 14:35:37


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