CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Tue, 02 Sep 2014 14:55:39 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 Your Uncertain Archive by Olafur Eliasson http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/your-uncertain-archive-by-olafur-eliasson http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/your-uncertain-archive-by-olafur-eliasson#feedback Tue, 02 Sep 2014 14:38:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80700

Artist Olafur Eliasson has launched a new, web-based artwork titled Your uncertain archive. The piece brings together images, sketches, texts, thoughts and ideas by the artist, all displayed in a drifting, engimatic landscape that visitors are invited to explore. CR talks to Eliasson about his thinking behind the work.

]]>

Artist Olafur Eliasson has launched a new, web-based artwork titled Your uncertain archive. The piece brings together images, sketches, texts, thoughts and ideas by the artist, all displayed in a drifting, engimatic landscape that visitors are invited to explore. CR talks to Eliasson about his thinking behind the work.

Described by the artist as a new "homepage", Your uncertain archive can be found on the main homepage on his site by clicking on a mysterious symbol, or reached directly at olafureliasson.net/uncertain. The work was designed in-house at Eliasson's Berlin studio by a small team led by Daniel Massey over a period of four years. It uses WebGL technologies and the three.js Library to produce a 3D environment, accessible via Google Chrome and Firefox on a desktop computer, which will constantly change and grow over time.

The olafureliasson.net homepage, with the symbol for Your uncertain archive featured

The floating landscape of Your uncertain archive

Eliasson is well-known for his large-scale installation artworks, which have been displayed in museums all over the world. In 2003, he created The Weather Project for the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern, an artwork featuring a large yellow simulated sun which attracted over two million visitors. Other significant works have included four manmade waterfalls displayed in New York Harbor in 2008, and Your black horizon, a black cube created for the Venice Biennale in 2005 alongside architect David Adjaye, which was lit by a thin slice of light at the viewers' eye level.

His installations demand physical involvement and interaction from the viewer, and this in part is what he wanted to bring to this online work. "We started talking about the emotional relationship – or rather, the lack of emotional content – you have when working with an interface on a computer," he says. "The focus was really on the interface. Instead of trying to nail down the right architecture for the homepage, it was more about how could we find a way so the user of the homepage also becomes the generator of the homepage. So instead of you being a consumer, and 'taking' the homepage, you actually become an author, or maybe a co-author, and instead of consuming, you produce the content. That is directly taken from how I would normally talk about my work, and how I think about my work – the experience of the work is what constitutes the work."

Stills from Your uncertain archive

As visitors drift around the online space, they can click on the images to find out more about work featured, and also visit a 'Connections' section which offers up links between the content. There is an element of chance to everything though, which Eliasson is keen to encourage, as well as allowing visitors to experience a different kind of online atmosphere from what they might be used to. "I wanted Your uncertain archive to be a sphere or a thing inside of space," he says. "I looked at different computer programmes ... looking around at who has successfully mapped more atmospheric conditions. As we know, the internet has become a consumer-driven, very commodified and highly structured system, where quantifiable success is the primary driver. So this means all the non-quantifiable content, like soft structures ... are really marginalised."

Eliasson also deliberately wanted to avoid the dogmatic structures that most websites, and certainly online archives, tend to have, where visitors need to know what they are searching for in advance. "I wanted the chance to allow for a higher degree of negotiability, and also that little bit of discomfort in being slightly lost sometimes," he says. "Not too lost but lost in the sense of having to work a little harder to find your path.... We're so used to commodified home pages, everything is about predictability, in order to make people feel safe. So feeling safe is very often associated with generating profit – the internet has become a consumer-driven money-maker, it's become a shopping mall. The lack of predictability also has to do with allowing for a space where you have to work a little bit harder without necessarily having to buy something."

More stills from Your uncertain archive

Eliasson is very active on Twitter and other social media sites, and is conscious that the internet has brought many people to his work, who may not have experienced it 'in the flesh' at galleries and exhibitions. “At the beginning of the year I travelled though China quite a bit and I met so many artists who were very familiar with my works and they all knew it from the internet," he says. "I’m teaching at the university at Addis Ababa in Ethiopia in the arts department and there they use the internet all the time because there’s a certain limit to how much contemporary art is being shown in Addis Ababa – there’s a big creative community, really vibrant and they totally depend on the internet to make a frame of reference."

Despite how much art is now accessed via the internet, Your uncertain archive is a fairly rare example of a major artist engaging with the medium to create something unexpected online. Eliasson thinks this will change in time, however. "At the art school where I’ve been teaching for five years in Berlin, there were several people who were really very talented in programming and it was not the primary thing they did," he says. "I think that what we’re seeing is the older generation of artists are having a harder time but I do think that a lot of younger artists do have incredible homepages. For somebody my age programming is an abstract language, I’m slowly understanding a little bit it’s potential and limitations, but for people younger than me programming is really not so far away."

Visit Your uncertain archive at olafureliasson.net/uncertain. Eliasson's work can also be seen in a major solo exhibition by the artist at Louisiana Museum in Denmark, which is on until January 4, 2015. More info is here.

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80700
Warp releases Syro artwork by The Designers Republic http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/syro-aphex-twin http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/syro-aphex-twin#feedback Tue, 02 Sep 2014 12:50:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80677

After teasing fans for weeks with blimps, online snapshots and mysterious street art, Warp Records has finally released the full artwork for Aphex Twin’s forthcoming album, Syro. Created by The Designers Republic, the packaging lists every cost involved in the making and promotion of the album...]]>

After teasing fans for weeks with blimps, online snapshots and mysterious street art, Warp Records has finally released the full artwork for Aphex Twin’s forthcoming album, Syro. Created by The Designers Republic, the packaging lists every cost involved in the making and promotion of the album...

Released on 22 September, Syro is Aphex Twin's (Richard James) first new album since 2001. The release of the artwork follows the appearance of a blimp featuring the Aphex Twin logo in the skies over London, and graffiti on the streets of New York last weekend.

A collaboration between James and The Designers Republic, which has worked on campaigns and sleeves for Warp since the label's inception, the artwork lists the costs involved in making and promoting the album, from courier charges to photoshoot expenses, expressed per disc and tailored for both vinyl and CD versions:

 

Ian Anderson, founder of The Designers Republic, says the concept is based on ideas suggested by James in early discussions about the album's packaging. “At the beginning of the process we discussed a few ideas Richard wanted to explore – one was the idea of pressing the album or a single track into the fabric of the cover, effectively as a deboss; a second was to use shots of the raw vinyl pucks albums are pressed from; and the third was to document in some way every cost involved in the production of the specific album format the purchaser had in their hands,” he explains.

“The intense, and ultimately pointless detail of the list really appealed to me ... it was good working with James Burton and the team at Warp to stretch out this mantra that tells the reader everything and nothing about the creation of what I hear was an intensely personal album in the making reduced to the numbers of an album in the marketplace,” he adds.

The debossed bonus track appears in a limited edition perspex vinyl version (an edition of 200, it costs £250), while puck shots are used on vinyl labels. TDR has also created 'a disinfographic', listing all of the equipment used to make the album.

The album is the third release that TDR has designed artwork for - the studio also worked on Windowlicker and Come to Daddy, which featured unsettling imagery shot by video artist Chris Cunningham (referenced in the deluxe slip case for the deluxe vinyl). While the new release has a notably different look, Anderson says all three are united by "a sense of non-design - of playing with formats and the preconceptions the audience may have of both what music packaging should be, and specifically what Aphex Twin’s packaging design should look like.”

"For Windowlicker, the video and images were so strong that really all we had to do was frame them. The skill here was to let the images do the work while creating space and something typographic which were recognisable in themselves in parallel with Chris’s work," he says.

"For Come To Daddy, there was a thicker plot involving a series of TDR™ generated text based promos as well as a remix CD featuring the music from an Orange mobile TV ad. There were issues about using an image from the ad so we resorted creating an orange cover with text describing the action from the ad. The typography was designed to appear neutral which is again a key factor in the non-design idea behind Syro."

Anderson also says the design is intended to challenge consumers and question notions of value: "The stripped down intentional un-typography, reducing the legibility of the bigger picture in its super detail, clashing with the inherent obsolescence of the pumped up format packaging, asks questions of the consumer that the content can’t alone," he says.

"It’s interesting that some people regard the design in terms of what they can see, designers judging it on craft and typography and fans seeing it in terms of value for money (ironically), for example, when the real message lies in the deconstructive absence of either."

Syro is released by Warp Records on 22 September. To pre-order a copy, click here.

]]> http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80677
Film4's new look http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/film4-rebrand http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/film4-rebrand#feedback Tue, 02 Sep 2014 10:44:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80684

Film4 has launched an updated on-air brand identity with 16 new idents created by ManvsMachine. The films feature movie references throughout and were shot using a custom built in-camera device to create a moving film strip effect...

]]>

Film4 has launched an updated on-air brand identity with 16 new idents created by ManvsMachine. The films feature movie references throughout and were shot using a custom built in-camera device to create a moving film strip effect...

Idents were shot in five locations in the US and UK including Brighton's Grand Hotel and a gas station in California. Three films were shot at each location and each has a different ending and tone: scenes at the gas station show children riding on bikes, a burning tyre rolling across the screen and a parked police car, while idents shot in the woods include one with wolves, another with scenes of children camping and a third with a mysterious, eerie light shining behind Film4's logo.

"We wanted to avoid genres, such as horror or sci-fi, as they can feel a bit clicd, and create a set of moods instead," explains ManvsMachine creative director Mike Alderson.

"Locations are deliberately ambiguous and each film starts off ambiguously, before being taken in a different direction. There's a sense of wonderment in the children riding bikes, while the tyre is a bit more aggressive, and the police car suggests something darker and more ominous," he adds. "In the woods, the light provides a nod to Moonrise Kingdom, but avoids anything overtly 'sci-fi'."

To create the moving film strip effect featured in each ident, ManvsMachine built a custom in-camera device which 'stacks' live action scenes. Cameras had to be passed through the floor and ceiling of sets during filming and holes dug in the ground at exterior locations.

"It was trickier than it looks to do," explains Alderson. "The camera has to start the same height above and below the space, so we had to build elevated sets and dig a huge hole in the woods [in California]. We even had an archaeologist with us making sure we didn't dig up any Native American remains," he adds.

Each ident is littered with references to films in various genres to reflect the channel's diverse output and audience. Scenes shot in a pink corridor provide an obvious nod to Stanley Kubrick's The Shining, as well as Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel, but also reference films including Poltergeist and Gravity. One ident, shot in a motel room, references 42 different films.

"We wanted to create something film buffs would enjoy watching, but we also wanted the idents to appeal to anyone - I hope even people who don't spot the references will like them," adds Alderson.

In keeping with the cinematic approach to idents, titles introducing films appear in red and black and are inspired by film posters and sequences from the 60s and 70s. An intelligent typographic system resizes titles depending on screen space, to ensure each film is given an equal billing.

"Our core mantra, throughout the whole project, was that it needed to be a film channel, not a TV channel. We felt it was really important to keep red and black as the only two colours, and that every title should be given the same prominence, whether it's a high end production or something more lowbrow or low budget," adds Alderson.

With the majority of effects created in camera and CGI kept to a minimum, Alderson says the idents are "a homage to the craft of filmmaking". The studio has also released a making of video revealing some of the process behind the idents:

It's a lovely set of films and the stacking device creates a distinctive visual signature, while the set design, typographic details and visual effects create a suitably rich, cinematic feel.

Credits
Concept, Design & Direction: ManvsMachine
Agency & Production Company: 4creative
Creative Director: Dan Chase
Producer:Liz Arnott
DoP: Alex Barber
Art Direction / Set Design: Simon Davies, Max Orgell
Post Production: Analog
Music: Resonate

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80684
Peggy Angus: Designer, Teacher, Painter http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/peggy-angus-towner-gallery http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/peggy-angus-towner-gallery#feedback Tue, 02 Sep 2014 10:14:00 +0000 Sarah Snaith http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80680

A new show on the work of artist and designer Peggy Angus (1904-93) at Towner in Eastbourne is an exhibition of the woman as much as the work. Full of her prints, patterns, posters and tile designs, it also reveals how her home in East Sussex became a creative hub for many artists...

]]>

One of Angus' tile murals for Heathrow airport, 1955

A new show on the work of artist and designer Peggy Angus (1904-93) at Towner in Eastbourne is an exhibition of the woman as much as the work. Full of her prints, patterns, posters and tile designs, it also reveals how her home in East Sussex became a creative hub for many artists...

Anecdotes about Angus' fiery personality are dotted throughout the two large gallery spaces at Towner, in the form of audio and video interviews.

She emerges as a designer whose creative practice fuelled her life and enabled her to bring together many celebrated artists and architects of her time – such as Eric Ravilious and John Piper – at her Furlongs home in East Sussex.

Furlongs, Angus' home in East Sussex. Image from author James Russell's post about his new book on the designer's work, Peggy Angus: Designer, Teacher, Painter (£25), available from the Antique Collectors' Club, here

Angus had befriended Ravilious and Edward Bawden at the Royal College of Art where she studied in the School of Art, and later Design, with the assistance of a scholarship that specified that she was to gain a teaching diploma.

Though not her career of choice, Angus appears to have been a great inspiration to students at North London Collegiate School in Muswell Hill (see comments from former students on the Guardian's review of the show here) and had very strong opinions about the manner in which art should be taught.

Wallpaper design by Angus

Tile design by Angus

One aspect of Angus's practice was designing tiles cut from lino, which grew out of her making potato prints with her students at NLCS, some of which are displayed at Towner (there are repeat patterns by students Jean Craighead, Margaret Smith and Marina Dunbar).

These prints caught the attention of the architect FRS Yorke who then commissioned Angus to design a mural for the Lansbury Lawrence Primary School in Tower Hamlets.

Tile mural for Brussels World Fair, 1958

Other London locations that once displayed Angus' work include both Heathrow (c.1955) and Gatwick airports, but her designs also featured in primary schools in Wimbledon and Hemel Hempstead, the Glyndŵr University in Wales and at the Brussels World Fair (1958).

Sadly, most of her large-scale tile murals have been lost to refurbishments or demolition, but they are represented in the exhibition as photographs.

Tile mural at Glyndŵr University, Wrexham, Wales

In addition, the exhibition showcases several of her paintings, displayed in their original – somewhat-weathered – frames that sit side by side with watercolours by Eric Ravilious.

They show their shared inspirations – places like the Asham Cement Works – as well as their close friendship.

Ravilious' works 'Furlongs' and 'Interior, Furlongs' (both 1934) are appropriately displayed next to Angus' 'Eric Ravilious and Helen Binyon at Furlongs' and 'Angus and Victoria at Breakfast in Furlongs' (1945).

Angus' painting Asham Cement Works, oil on canvas, 1934

Angus's weekend home in the Furlongs is presented as a kind of creative hub, where visitors were expected to participate and enrich the environment, even adding to the interiors. As an avid letter writer and lover of paper, photographs show how the house, however modest, was touched by art, with items as insignificant as cereal boxes covered in her wallpaper designs, stuffed with copies of correspondence.

In Furlongs, Angus appears to have been in her prime, telling embellished stories and filling the house with laughter.

Furlongs, Angus' home in East Sussex

Also on display are the wallpaper designs that post-dated the tile designs, as they became less fashionable, and a selection of posters for exhibitions showcasing the work produced at her People's Creative Workshop in Camden that made art and design accessible to the elderly local community.

Angus, while Chilean born and London bred, is claimed by the gallery as a local artist for the contribution she made to the area. The Towner exhibition is a celebration of a designer, teacher and painter who has largely been forgotten and rightly attempts to position her among the greats of her time.

All images are © Estate of Peggy Angus. The exhibition continues at Towner, Devonshire Park, College Road, Eastbourne, BN21 4JJ until September 21. Towner is also teaming with Manchester School of Art to host a symposium, Women in Print: Print as an agent of change 1920-1960, that will feature a paper on Angus, on September 13 2014

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80680
Grayson Perry: Playing to the Gallery http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/playing-to-the-gallery http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/playing-to-the-gallery#feedback Mon, 01 Sep 2014 13:26:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80672

Artist Grayson Perry has released a book based on his BBC4 Reith Lecture series, Playing to the Gallery, which aims to demistify contemporary art and prove that "anybody can enjoy it." An entertaining and insightful read, it also contains a new series of 30 witty drawings...

]]>

Artist Grayson Perry has released a book based on his BBC4 Reith Lecture series, Playing to the Gallery, which aims to demistify contemporary art and prove that "anybody can enjoy it." An entertaining and light-hearted read, it also contains a new series of witty drawings...

Playing to the Gallery is divided into four chapters, with each addressing a basic question about the art world, from 'What counts as art?' to 'How do you become a contemporary artist?' Perry says the book aims to answer the basic questions that many people think of while in a gallery, but are often too embarrassed to ask.

"[People] might think they're irrelevant ... or that everybody already knows the answer. But I don't think that's true. The art world needs people to keep asking it questions, and thinking about those questions helps the enjoyment and understanding of art," he writes.

The first section, Democracy Has Bad Taste, explains the process of validation that leads to an artist's work being exhibited in major galleries, and the role of critics, curators, dealers, buyers and the public in shaping an artist's reputation.

The next chapter, Beating the Bounds, considers how to determine what is and isn't art: "We're in a state where anything goes. But there are still boundaries about what can and cannot be art; the limits are just softer and fuzzier," explains Perry. He presents a series of pointers which can be used to test whether something is really art, from who it's made by and the context in which it is shown, to what he calls "the handbag and hipster test."

"Quite often you can't tell if something is a work of art apart from the fact that people are standing around and looking at it. If there are lots of people with beards and glasses and single-speed bikes, or oligarchs' wives with great big handbags looking a bit perturbed and puzzled by what they're staring at, then it's probably art," he says.

In Nice Rebellion, Welcome In! Perry considers whether art is still capable of shocking us, arguing that while it can still be inventive and surprising, contemporary art is incapable of shocking in the same way as Roy Lichtenstein's graphic paintings or Marcel Duchamp's urinal. "Anything can be art now ... the idea of an artwork falling outside the boundaries of what art can be isn't going to happen anymore," he says.

The final chapter outlines the process of becoming a contemporary artist, and includes Perry's reflections on experimenting with pottery aged nine, deciding to become an artist aged 16 and studying at Portsmouth Polytechnic.

While he admits that going to art school is (in most cases) unlikely to lead to a life of riches, Perry also makes a strong case for doing so. "Of course people can become artists without going to art college - but it's very difficult, if not impossible, to make a career as an artist if you haven't gone to college," he says, praising art schools for offering a valuable refuge where students are encouraged to experiment, fail and learn from their mistakes.

The book is littered with personal anecdotes and contains some wise advice for aspiring artists - Perry encourages them to take any opportunity that comes along, and not be deterred or embark on a radical change of direction if their early work is compared to someone else's. "Originality takes time. Carving out a career takes time," he adds.

Perry also pokes fun at the pretensions of the art world and contradictions within it, from the unecessary complexity of "International Art English" often used to describe pieces, to the growing commodification of the art world, despite its continued desire to be seen as rebellious and firmly anti-establishment.

Playing to the Gallery is an accessible, enjoyable read for anyone who is keen to learn more about art but perhaps feels a little intimidated by the subject. It's also a fond reflection on 30 years of working in the industry - for all his jokes, Perry says the book is "in some ways, a love letter to the art world."

"If I have been teasing (bullying it) it is because I know the art world can take it, in fact it encourages it. None of my jibes stop the great art being awesomely beautiful," he writes.

Playing to the Gallery is published on September 4 by Particular Books and costs £14.99. To order a copy click here.


]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80672
New Oyster card holders celebrate the Year of the Bus http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/tfl-oyster-card-holders http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/tfl-oyster-card-holders#feedback Mon, 01 Sep 2014 12:38:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80665

Transport for London and designjunction have once again teamed up with Outline Artists to launch a limited edition set of Oyster card holders designed by illustrators and graphic artists.

]]>

Transport for London and designjunction have again teamed up with Outline Artists to launch a limited edition set of Oyster card holders designed by illustrators and graphic artists.

While last year's designs (read our blog post on them here) celebrated the 150th anniversary of the London Underground, this year's mark the Year of the Bus.

The series includes work by Crispin Finn, Edward Carvalho-Monaghan, Noma Bar, Malika Favre, Kate Moross, Mina Lima, Studio Emmi, Jean Jullien, Rod Hunt and Kristjana Williams.

Monaghan's (top) features a series of characters, each representing a London attraction, in a colour of the bus line which travels to it. The sphinx, for example, represents the British Museum, while the astronaut represents the Science Museum.

Crispin Finn's typographic design references the noise of a conductor pulling the cord on a Routemaster:

Studio Emmi's is inspired by vintage bus blinds:

And Hunt says he was inspired by central London route maps, which almost appeared to spell out the word 'bus'.

Bar's is dedicated to "the horizontal commuters of the night bus ... who can lie down after a long day's work or a long night out":

Mina Lima's also pays homage to the Routemaster:

And Favre's depicts the views on a bus journey across the Thames (the design will also be available as a print):

 

Holders are available to pre-order at tfl.gov.uk/shop and cost £6.99 each or £60 for the full set. They will also be on sale at Outline Editions' stand at designjunction from September 18-21, where TfL and the East London Liquor Company will be hosting a bus-themed pop-up restaurant.

 

Jean Jullien

Kate Moross

Kristjana Williams

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80665
Supermundane: Here & There http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/here-there http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/here-there#feedback Mon, 01 Sep 2014 10:42:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80650

Graphic artist Supermundane (Rob Lowe) has a new show at Brighton's No Walls Gallery, described as both a microsopic and distant look at his work...

]]>

Graphic artist Supermundane (Rob Lowe) has a new show at Brighton's No Walls Gallery, described as both a microscopic and distant look at his work.

Open until late September, Here & There features more than 30 new paintings and drawings in a range of styles, from intricate linework to cosmic ink paintings and simpler geometric prints. The display also features a collection of 80 wooden 'innocences' - small domed characters which have appeared in several of Lowe's previous artworks.

The cosmic paintings are a notable departure from Lowe's detailed typographic illustrations and large-scale murals and represent a "universal look at his work from afar," he says. Contrasting multi coloured lines represent the interior of his drawings, much like rings on a tree. "They're what I think of as being inside my drawings, if you chopped them up," he explains.

The show builds on Lowe's previous experiments with size, scale and depth, such as his 2012 exhibition at Kemistry Gallery, which featured a series of geometric designs based on details from his drawings blown up and simplified to the point of abstraction.

It also follows an exhibition at Beach gallery, Stupid Nature, in which he experimented with a more painterly, less controlled approach to painting (the show featured a series of abstract two colour drawings in red, black and blue).

"I'd been playing around with the idea of contextualising this world I'd created in my work over the years, looking at it up close and from a distance," explains Lowe. "The way the pieces are arranged in the gallery presents a kind of landscape, from very small to vast - the here and the there," he says.

 

Here & There is on show at No Walls Gallery, 114 Church Street, Brighton BN1 1UD until September 20. For details, see nowallsgallery.com.

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80650
Exploring Printing History at The Newberry http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/the-newberry-library-type-specimens http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/the-newberry-library-type-specimens#feedback Mon, 01 Sep 2014 09:41:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80252

The Newberry Library's archive of printing history has been documented online since June this year, featuring everything from type specimens and catalogues, to posters and direct mail. It's also accompanied by some astute commentary, making it one of the most interesting print and type blogs around...

]]>

From a supplement to Morgan Press' Wood Type Catalog, 1960s

The Newberry Library's archive of printing history has been documented online since June this year, featuring everything from type specimens and catalogues, to posters and direct mail. It's also accompanied by some astute commentary, making it one of the most interesting print and type blogs around...

Founded in 1887 The Newberry is an independent research library in Chicago which offers its readers an extensive  collection of "rare books, maps, music, manuscripts, and other printed material spanning six centuries."

The Exploring Printing History at the Newberry blog was brought to our attention via a tweet from @Monotype (who in turn credited @Okaytype and @Rebeletter).

The site is part of a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) funded project called Printing Specimens (1605-present) at the Newberry Library, an initiative which aims to shed light on the institutions "hidden collection" of type and printing material "both beautiful and homely, of all periods."

From a supplement to Morgan Press' Wood Type Catalog, 1960s

From Établissements Nicolas Liste de Grands Vins (1950), printed by Draeger Frères, with illustrations by R. Harada

From a catalogue from Bauer Type Foundry and Bauersche Giesserei advertising Bernhard Brushscript and Bernhard Cursive, designed by Lucian Bernhard

"This is a two and a half year project to catalog and process over 29,800 items that are part of the Newberry's John M. Wing Foundation on the History of Printing," the site explains.

"The Wing collection is one of the world's oldest and largest specialised collections on book arts and printing history. This project will provide access to a large assemblage of primary source materials dating from 1605 to the present, both books and ephemera, which serve as specimens of printing at every period."

A selection of some our favourite images from newberryprinting.tumblr.com follows.

Tempo Light and Bold (1931), another take on the Tempo typeface from Ludlow

Illustration of the four-colour printing process from Advertising Production: A Manual on the Mechanics of Newspaper Printing (1946) by Ben Dalgin

A Few Suggestions for Ornamental Decoration: a Collection of Designs & Colour Schemes for Painters' & Decorators' Work (1908) contains not only suggestions for decorative work, but samples of Thos. Parsons & Sons tints, paints, and varnishes

L'Art de Boire: Préparer, Servir, Boire (1927) written by Louis Forest, illustrated by Charles Martin, and published by our  Établissements Nicolas as part of their Monseigneur le Vin series. Full series is here
The CLIR Cataloging and Hidden Special Collections and Archives program is made possible through funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

See newberryprinting.tumblr.com.

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80252
Guardian Eyewitness exhibition at Foyles in London http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/guardian-eyewitness-exhibition-at-foyles http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/guardian-eyewitness-exhibition-at-foyles#feedback Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:48:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80611

Opening next week at the flagship Foyles bookstore on Charing Cross Road in London is an exhibition of photographs by David Levene that have appeared in the Guardian Eyewitness series. A selection of the images are shown here, and we talk to Roger Tooth, head of photography at the Guardian, about what makes a good Eyewitness image...

]]>

Szechenyi Baths, Budapest, 2006

Opening next week at the flagship Foyles bookstore on Charing Cross Road in London is an exhibition of photographs by David Levene that have appeared in the Guardian Eyewitness series. A selection of the images are shown here, and we talk to Roger Tooth, head of photography at the Guardian, about what makes a good Eyewitness image...

The Eyewitness series has appeared as a double-page spread in the centre of the Guardian since 2005, when the newspaper introduced its Berliner format. Levene has produced images for it from the start and has had over 120 photos featured in the slot, which appears daily. For the exhibition at Foyles he has picked his ten favourites – each will be reproduced in large format in the space, at over 1.5 metres across.

WSOP, Las Vegas, 2007

Boca La Caja, Panama City, 2008

According to Tooth, the Eyewitness spread was initially due to appear only three days a week, but when the team saw the impact of producing photography at such a large scale, they decided to run it daily. "The ideal Eyewitness picture has to be strong visually and the subject must justify the treatment," Tooth continues. "It needs to have a lot of detail to retain and reward the viewer's interest. It works well when the majority of, or all the image is in focus: large, out-of-focus areas seem ugly when scaled-up. Quite a challenge for the Guardian's picture editors."

Bathing, Varanasi, 2007

Slipstream, Heathrow, 2014

The image that will appear in the slot is decided on the day, with the picture editors presenting options to the duty editor at midday. "Sometimes we have planned something, but as often as not it's a picture that has been shot by us or submitted to us on the day," says Tooth.

"We try to change the mood of the image each day," he continues. "A hard news image one day might be followed by an arts subject the next. The large picture agencies send us a tremendous variety of subjects, some of the most beautiful are often those 'slice of life' images documenting the daily lives of people from around the world. Like David's image from Varanasi (above). Always popular are images from the natural world: we've published some memorable polar bears and elephants."

Ballerinas, London, 2008

Kibera, Nairobi, 2006

"Nothing is off-limits subject-wise," continues Tooth, "although in these days of grim news and very serious papers with the content reflecting events, we sometimes use the centre-spread to leaven the mood of the day's edition.... Occasionally we will use the pages for a picture spread, although the single picture is the daily aim. The single picture is a far bolder statement, a tremendous vote of confidence in a photograph for its beauty or the strength of its news value. David's fascinating photograph of slums next to high-rise developments in Panama City is a great example of photojournalism, while his picture from the Royal Opera House has a compelling beauty. These pictures also have a tremendous feeling of 'being there', being an eyewitness."

While the Eyewitness series perhaps works best in print, where it is the only daily print photo feature of this size in the UK press, it has also proved popular on digital platforms. "It has translated very successfully to an online app," says Tooth, "which looks great on a high-definition tablet screen."

Filling Station, Dhaka, 2013

Honbasho, Osaka, 2009. All images courtesy David Levene

'David Levene: Eyewitness' will be on show at The Gallery at Foyles on Charing Cross Road from September 2 until October 26. The exhibition is curated by Mark Davy of Futurecity. David Levene will also take part in a discussion about the Eyewitness series on September 24 at 7pm. This event is free, but tickets need to be reserved in advance – more info is here.

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80611
What makes a great image? CR's Photography Annual judges share their favourite work http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/alan-wilson http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/alan-wilson#feedback Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:15:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80570

With the deadline for submissions to CR's Photography Annual fast approaching, we asked this year's judges what they think makes a great image and which photos have caught their attention in the past 12 months. First up is Alan Wilson, art director at AMV BBDO in London... ]]>

Artist painting the scene in Hrushevsky Street, Kiev, by Adam Hinton

With the deadline for submissions to CR's Photography Annual fast approaching, we asked this year's judges what they think makes a great image and which photos have caught their attention in the past 12 months. First up is Alan Wilson, art director at AMV BBDO in London...

We're introducing some important changes to this year's Photography Annual. We want to celebrate not just the work of photographers themselves but also those who commission and art direct great images, whether in advertising, magazines online or via a photo library.

As well as adding categories for the best use of photography in advertising and marketing campaigns, by fashion brands and in editorial, we're introducing one to celebrate the best images commissioned by image libraries and for the first time, entries will be displayed in an online gallery.

Judges for this year include Jessica Crombie, head of visual creative at Save the Children, Sarah Douglas, creative director at Wallpaper, Daniel Moorey, head of print at Adam&EveDDB, Sarah Thomson, head of art production at Fallon London, Gemma Fletcher, senior art director at Getty Images and Alan Wilson, art director at AMV BBDO. Here, Wilson outlines his favourite photographers and recent series, from Evian's Live Young campaign to Adam Hinton's coverage of Kiev...

Protestor manning barricades at Hrushevsky Street, Kiev, by Adam Hinton

What image or series has impressed you most in the past 12 months?

Adam Hinton’s photographic coverage [top and above] of the political unrest in Kiev is incredible. Every so often I revisit certain photographers websites to see what they’ve been up to and this series pulled me straight in. Adam somehow managed to capture a real sense of intimacy during the violent unrest. And also, in the weeks that followed, as the protesters paid their respects to those who had given their lives.

What, to you, makes a great image?

It could be its anger and intensity. Maybe it beguiles you with its beauty. It could be a visionary idea. Maybe it’s a something you’ve never seen before. Or something very familiar, but approached in an extraordinary way. Most importantly, nomatter what the subject matter, a truly great image will stop you in your tracks.

What photographers do you think are doing really great work right now?

Where do I start? There are so many people producing incredible work right now. In no particular order: Blinkk [Leila and Damien de Blinkk], Nadav Kander, Robert Wilson, Hinton, Julia Fullerton-Batten, Tim Flach, Rankin, Alison Jackson, George Logan … I’ve been fortunate to work with some of them. I’d love to work with all of them.

Nadav Kander's Time Flies ad for Age UK (read our interview with Kandar about the making of the ad here).

101's ad for Scottish Widows, shot by Blinkk

Tim Flach's image of panda Ya Yun and Julia Fullerton Batten's Blind series, featured on the cover of CR's 2013 Photography Annual


George Logan's images for Whiskas Big Cat Little Cat campaign, winner of best life series at last year's AOP Awards


Alison Jackson's spoof images of Prince William and Kate and Prince Harry, featured on alisonjackson.com

And what organisations do you think are making great use of photography at the moment?

Only this morning on my way into work I couldn’t help but notice the Evian ‘Live Young’ poster campaign. It was hard not to notice because they’d taken over Oxford Circus tube station. It’s light hearted of course but what’s so impressive for me is that it’s for a water brand. It’s such a difficult brief and they've really made it stand out from the crowd. All done with absolute simplicity and charm.

Ads from Evian's Live Young campaign

The final deadline for entries to this year’s Photography Annual is September 11. For details on how to submit your work, or for more info about the annual, click here.

]]> http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=80570