CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Wed, 17 Sep 2014 18:32:59 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 London Design Festival: LCC 160 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/lcc-160 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/lcc-160#feedback Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:33:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81206

London College of Communication has launched a trio of exhibitions as part of this year’s London Design Festival, showcasing 50 years of illustration, 100 years of graphic design and ten years of button badges.

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London College of Communication has launched a trio of exhibitions as part of this year’s London Design Festival, showcasing 50 years of illustration, 100 years of graphic design and ten years of button badges.

The exhibitions are open at LCC until late October and include a look at a new Laurence King book on illustration, a collection of 1000 badges from Stereohype and an exhibition celebrating poster designers Tom Eckersley, Abram Games, FHK Henrion, Josef Müller-Brockmann and Paul Rand.

50 Years of Illustration

In the college's Upper Street Gallery, 50 Years of Illustration presents extracts from a new book of the same name by Professor Lawrence Zeegen, Dean of LCC's School of Design, and Grafik founder Caroline Roberts. Published on October 1, it charts developments in illustration from the 1960s to 2010 and showcases iconic artwork from each decade alongside essays on the social and political factors influencing illustrators at the time.

The show is divided into five sections (one for each decade) and each display features an introductory essay on the period alongside spreads from the book and key work reproduced in large-scale prints.

The 60s includes work by Klaus Voormann, Pushpin Studios, Maurice Sendak and Heinz Edelmann and comments on the expressive nature of image-making at the time, the influence of hallucinogenic drugs and political reform on popular culture and the influence of Victorian typography and art nouveau in illustrations from the period:

The 70s focuses on punk culture and a DIY aesthetic, with work from Roger Dean, Ian Beck, Alan Aldridge, Raymond Briggs and Philip Castle, while featured illustrators from the 80s include Barney Bubbles, Huntley Muir, Hunt Emerson, Patrick Nagel and Marshall Arisman (creator of the cover image for Breat Easton Ellis novel American Psycho).

The 90s and 00s sections highlight the explosion of digital media and the introduction of a new digital aesthetic. Kate Gibb, Shephard Fairey, Jasper Goodall, Marion Deuchars and papercut artist Rob Ryan are among those featured. It's not a comprehensive overview of the history of illustration - as Zeegen points out, the book and show is "a mere slice of the discipline's rich heritage" - but it does provide a look at some of the most influential and widely recognised book jackets, album art and posters in modern history, and illustration's relationship with popular culture.

100 years of graphic design

Elsewhere in the college, Alan Kitching and Monotype: Celebrating the centenary of five pioneers of the poster commemmorates the 100th anniversary of the birth of Abram Games, FHK Henrion, Josef Müller-Brockmann, Paul Rand and Tom Eckersley (Eckersley set up the school of graphic design at the London School of Printing, now LCC).

The show was curated and designed by Daniel Chehade and features some of the designers' best-known posters, from Eckersley's 'Cyclists, keep them clean' and Victoria line designs to Games' work for London Transport.

It also includes video interviews with Games, Eckersley and Henrion, in which the designers reflect on their craft and perceptions of graphic design, specimen books from Monotype's archives for fonts used by the designers, including Futura and Rockwell, and spreads from textbooks and issues of Graphis which feature articles on their work.

Alongside this is a look at the making of a series of screen prints commemorating each designer, which were commissioned by Monotype and designed by Alan Kitching and Chehade.

Originally exhibited in Monotype's Century exhibition, held in New York to mark AIGA's centenary, each screenprint features a monogram for that designer, made up of overlapping letters - in each case, one from Monotype's archives and a wood letter from Kitching's workshop.

The finished prints are beautifully produced, and hang alongside the designers' posters in the gallery. A short film explains the making of the project and offers a look at the printing process, while wood letters, inks and sketches are housed in glass display cases. It's a fascinating look at printing and a stunning selection of historic posters.

 

Stereohype 2004-2014

The third event on show at LCC celebrates the tenth anniversary of graphic art label Stereohype, founded by design studio Fl@33. The label runs an annual button badge design competition each year and regularly invites designers to create badges for its By Invitation Only range. Over one thousand button badges are featured in the exhibition - some fixed to the gallery walls, others in glass display cases and a framed artwork (close up below).

 

To celebrate the event and its anniversary, Stereohype commissioned ten designers and artists to create a badge and poster inspired by the number 10 and/or 1000, or 10x10. Contributing creatives include Kitching, Build's Michael Place, Daniel Eatock, Genevieve Gauckler, Vaughan Oliver, TwoPoints and Fl@33 co-founder Agathe Jacquillat. Each designer created an original letterpress poster, which has also been reproduced as giclee prints in editions of 10 (each one costs £350).

Visitors to the show can also design and submit their own button badges at the show - and a catalogue featuring every button badge designed is available to purchase at the event (cover and spreads shown below).

50 Years of Illustration and Stereohype 2004-2014 are on show at London College of Communication SE1 6SB until October 31. Alan Kitching and Monotype: Celebrating the Centenary of Five Pioneers of the Poster is open until October 16. For details, see events.arts.ac.uk

50 Years of Illustration is published by Laurence King on October 1 and costs £30. To order a copy, click here.

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Yes or No: the visual battleground in Scotland's referendum http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/scotland-referendum-yes-no http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/scotland-referendum-yes-no#feedback Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:58:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81237

In the run up to Scotland's referendum both the 'Yes' and 'No' campaigns have unleashed a groundswell of support that has seen posters, signs and graphics taking over the country in an act of political engagement not seen for some years. With voting finally taking place tomorrow, we look at the significance of the visual imagery that has represented the two campaigns...

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Handmade 'Yes' sign, via Bruce Paterson (@sheepshagger81) and @YesWindaes

In the run up to Scotland's referendum both the 'Yes' and 'No' campaigns have unleashed a groundswell of support that has seen posters, signs and graphics taking over the country in an act of political engagement not seen for some years. With voting finally taking place tomorrow, we look at the significance of the visual imagery that has represented the two campaigns...

As Thursday's vote concerns a referendum for independence rather than an election, the most prevalent images have been based around the choice that will be on offer on the ballot paper: a 'Yes' for independence or a 'No' for retaining the union with the UK. These simple words have become the shorthand for the two campaigns and 'Yes' and 'No' graphics are at the very centre of official – and unofficial – communications.

It's a decision about nationhood so flags are naturally abundant, too: the Scottish Saltire adopted by the independence camp; the UK flag by the pro-union Better Together movement. This distinction has at times been muddied, however: Better Together supporters have understandably flown both flags together in unity, for example, while Number 10's appeal for the rest of the UK to show its support for the union was conveyed by hoisting the Saltire over Downing Street (or rather, failing to do so on the first attempt).

 

Official 'Fluttering Saltire' graphic from Yes Scotland's image resources webpage

 

While the UK newspapers have overwhelmingly come out in favour of the 'No' vote (with the exception of The Sunday Herald and a handful of individual columnists such as George Monbiot in the Guardian), the story on social media is a little different.

According to the Financial Times, Facebook's recent analysis of more than 8.5m posts and comments made in August that related to the referendum found that pro-independence was the subject of 2.05m interactions, while the pro-union vote was the subject of some 1.96m – not much in it. Suggesting more of a difference between the two camps, the 'Yes' campaign currently has over 258,000 'likes' while the No has just over 192,000 (over the same period).

But it's on Twitter that the 'Yes' campaign has flourished and has managed to combine both traditional aspects of electioneering – posters, window stickers etc – with the reach that social media provides. (@YesScotland has 96k followers; @UK_Together 41k.)

The 'Yes' images shown below (and at the top of the post) are from the collection assembled at @YesWindaes. There are plenty of images on Twitter from the 'No' side show assembled groups of people holding signs, but, it seems, far less photographs of the signs displayed on their own.

The 'Yes' signs are frequently hand-made, or make use of the word within another context – “Yes. Yes! Oh God Yes!” running across three window panes, being a standout. In recent posts, 'Yes' has also appeared in fields, on the rockface beneath Edinburgh Castle, and spelled out by cameraphones.

 

'Yes' sign in window in East Lothian, via John Johnston @JohnPJohnston67

Och Aye, via María Isabel @Fairysoprano

Oh God Yes!, via Lisa Sangster @lisa_sangster

Joint effort in Edinburgh, via Phil Wells @phillywells

The people at @BigYesTee admit "it's no in a windae, but it's next to a windae"

'Yes' sign placed on the rockface beneath Edinburgh Castle, via Mark Newton @CutbackMark

 

Thousands of supporters from both sides have also added a 'Yes' or 'No Thanks' badge to their Twitter avatar (it's officially known as a 'Twibbon') – see below:

 

How to create a 'No' vote 'Twibbon', via bettertogether.net

 

Yet the difference between the graphics – effectively digital posters – distributed by both official Twitter feeds is striking. Better Together favours statistics and lengthy quotes in rather serious-looking layouts (see first three images below), while the 'Yes' campaign taps into more emotive language – and also serves up some decent illustration along with it.


"Alex Salmond’s response to NHS experts in Scotland is always the same", via @UK_Together

Author JK Rowling adds her support to Better Together, via @UK_Together

Rather misleadingly, the tweet accompanying this image featuring quotes by CEOs of various supermarkets read: "Supermarket bosses have made clear that leaving the UK would push up costs for families in Scotland". Via @UK_Together

Three recent tweets from @YesScotland – handmade aesthetic in evidence

 

The official websites to both campaigns (bettertogether.net and yesscotland.net) feature 'resources' pages where infographics, logos, posters and the like can be downloaded to help campaigners on the ground.

But here, too, it's all to clear that the 'Yes' camp has the edge when it comes to its branding and identity design. The 'No Thanks' logo looks fussily apologetic against the stridency of the 'Yes'.

When seen from a distance the legibility of the 'Yes' makes for a powerful graphic – and, as can be seen from the above self-initiated examples – it can be more easily adapted than its 'No Thanks' rival.

 

 

The two campaign logos

 

Finally, compare the films that play on the yesscotland.net website, to the infamous Better Together spot, The Woman Who Made Up Her Mind. The latter hoped to appeal to women voters who were undecided, but missed the mark so spectacularly as to spawn its own meme within hours of airing. #PatronisingBTLady – and the associated jpgs – became more fuel for the 'Yes' fire.

From this...

... to this:

Via @YesIndyref

Via @YesWithDex

Setting the huge implications of tomorrow's vote aside for a moment, in a purely semantic sense the messages consist of a positive versus a negative.

Imagine the difference if they were reversed: if 'No Thanks' was in favour of ditching the United Kingdom, and a 'Yes' was for staying in it? Suddenly the pro-union campaign sounds a lot more emotive, more inclusive.

On purely visual terms, to me 'Yes' has always looked stronger, is more suggestive of positivity and, as independence voters would no doubt suggest, progression. There's not long to wait to see what does happen – but by Friday morning, yes or no, a hugely significant decision will have been made.

 

'Yes' sign viewed from a plane, via @NotoriousYesVan

'Fireworks Yes' graphic from Yes Scotland's image resources webpage

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Dalton Maag launches new site allowing users to trial fonts for free http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/dalton-maag-website http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/dalton-maag-website#feedback Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:49:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81251

Type foundry Dalton Maag has launched a new website designed by Method, which features a range of new features and an option to try full font files for free before buying. We spoke to Bruno Maag and Method’s Tomi Lahdesmaki about the redesign...

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Type foundry Dalton Maag has launched a new website designed by Method, which features a range of new features and an option to try full font files for free before buying. We spoke to Bruno Maag and Method’s Tomi Lahdesmaki about the redesign...

The new site looks dramatically different to Dalton Maag's old and as well as simplified, fixed rate licensing options, it allows registered users to download full font files for pitches, non-commercial work and student projects free of charge.

While this is a risky move - there's no guarantee everyone who downloads the font will pay for it before using commercially - Dalton Maag chairman Bruno Maag says he hopes it will encourage designers to use the foundry's fonts in pitches and help justify high quality and bespoke typefaces to clients.

As Lahdesmaki explains, Maag was also aware that if a designer wanted to use a copy of one of the foundry's fonts for free, they could do so simply by asking friends or downloading from elsewhere on the web.

"The reality of the graphic design world is that fonts are distributed amongst designers for free. When a designer begins work on a specific project they often end up emailing all their buddies to track down a copy of a specific font so that they can play with it. If they like it and end up using it, then the designer will most likely suggest their client purchase the font. This is a reality that Dalton Maag embraced with the idea of releasing trial copies for all their fonts for free," he says.

"We know that the design industry is used to dealing with rights management for example with stock imagery or licensing music. We trust the user to ensure they have the correct license," adds Maag.

For users who choose to purchase a font, the new system is also much simpler: users can choose to purchase a web or app font and pay a fixed fee for that website or app per year (£48), with no limit on the number of end users. A perpetual license is priced at £480. It's a considerably cheaper alternative to complex licensing models, which are often calculated based on the number of users, page views or downloads.

"When licensing fonts for use on the web or in apps some foundries license based on the number of page views or number of app downloads," explains Maag. "This is inherently difficult for the user because they then have to monitor their website usage. It can also prove risky for a small developer who could be faced with a large bill if they happen to release the next angry birds or a website that goes viral.

"We recognised this and aimed to provide licensing that is fair no matter if you are a large corporate or an indie developer. These are time limited, we understand that websites and apps have a short lifespan so charge a flat fee per website or app per year," he adds.

Method and Dalton Maag say the new licensing options were influenced by digital music services such as iTunes and Spotify. Lahdesmaki says he hopes the trial font and new licensing options on the site "will fundamentally challenge and change the typography design industry, much in the same way that the music industry changed with the arrival of MP3s."

The reduced prices and unlimited usage options are likely to prove controversial - particularly among those who charge higher fees - but Maag says he hopes other foundries will "appreciate the changes and understand our reasoning behind them. If all foundries did the same thing it would be a very boring industry. Our new models may not be right for every foundry but they will help us achieve our goals over the coming years," he adds.

Visually, the new site is a considerable improvement on the old and features a bright, bold homepage displaying a range of the foundry’s fonts against original photography and illustration. Library and commissions pages take users to a similar layout, with font names displayed against brightly coloured backgrounds, while an about us section provides an introduction to the foundry and images of Dalton Maag staff. There’s also a blog section which will be updated with news, events and articles on works in progress.

Dalton Maag has been working with Method on the new site for around a year, with a range of new features to be added in the next few months. The agency was asked to create something that would work on any device and that users would want to visit for inspiration, not just when they were looking for a new font.

“Our old site had been static whilst the industry went through a period of change ... we wanted to respond to customer’s needs [and] thought it was important to conduct customer research and build a site that improved the experience for them,” says Maag.

Lahdesmaki says the site also aims to "tell the story" of the foundry's work, adding: “so much knowledge, talent and skill goes into the details of typography design – to properly appreciate the fonts, dedicated and immersive pages were required for fonts both library and commissioned."

Before working on the design, the agency conducted brand workshops and interviews with a range of creatives, from in-house designers to freelancers, to determine what they were looking for from a type foundry website. "Typography companies often take quite an insular approach, overly-focussed on the technique or technology of typography, all showing lots of big letters on white backgrounds, with the result that a lot of their websites look the same," he says.

"From our research it was clear that designers really see typeface design and choice as a key part of 'finding the voice' of a brand, and we embraced this as an idea that could connect everything – creating a unique visual world for each library and commissioned font to live in, and defining a new brand position for Dalton Maag as the partner that helps designers and brands to 'find your voice'," he explains.

The phrase 'Find Your Voice' is displayed at the top of the new homepage, and Maag believes this concept is what sets the website apart from its competitors. "Most foundries (including ourselves up until now) tend to show single characters from a font, big letters or phrases of text, often black text on a plain background.

"We realised this is not inspirational - type designers may appreciate the subtleties in the curve of a lowercase ‘a’, but our customers are more likely to be concerned with the voice the entire typeface carries. We think this is where some other foundries go wrong. Our new site aims to give all our fonts context, aiding decision making for the designer," he adds.

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Ben Jones illustrates a beautiful new edition of A Clockwork Orange, published by The Folio Society http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/clockwork-orange-folio-society http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/clockwork-orange-folio-society#feedback Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:10:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81140

The Folio Society has released a new version of Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange, which features a newly commissioned introduction by Irvine Welsh and some exquisite illustrations by Ben Jones...

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The Folio Society has released a new version of Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange, which features a newly commissioned introduction by Irvine Welsh and some exquisite illustrations by Ben Jones...

The book is published in hardback and comes in a slipcase. There are seven illustrations by Jones spread throughout, and he has also designed the cover, an embossed image of a man in a bowler hat.

 

 

The bowler hat became an iconic symbol for the book after Stanley Kubrick's 1971 movie pictured central character Alex DeLarge and his droogs wearing the hats alongside white overalls. Jones sees its inclusion here as a tribute to Kubrick's film, and its importance to the novel. "I do think that Kubrick is a big part of the book becoming immortal," he says in an interview filmed by the publishers, shown below.

Despite this, Jones tried to avoid Kubrick's imagery elsewhere in his illustrations for the book. "'I purposely stopped myself from watching the film while I was working on the job," he says, "mainly because I wanted to get away from Kubrick's iconic visual style, and develop my own take on the book, and stay true to Burgess's vision."

Jones used collage to bring Burgess's bleak, dystopian world to life in his illustrations. "I like the idea of collage, that you can take something that's existing, and turn it into something completely new," he says.

The Folio Society's edition of A Clockwork Orange works from the restored version of the text, first published in 2012, and includes the once-banned 21st chapter, as well as an expanded glossary, compiled with reference to Burgess’s handwritten notes and letters to his editors. It is available for £29.95 and can be bought directly from the publishers here.

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On the tartan farm http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/tartan-farm-projection-mapping http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/tartan-farm-projection-mapping#feedback Tue, 16 Sep 2014 14:32:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81135

Ahead of Scotland's referendum on Thursday, a vivid night-time celebration of the country's most famous pattern style has been unveiled on a farm near Edinburgh. Created by street artists TrenchOne, Elph and Purshone a giant projection covers a house, a barn and group of log cabins in what can only be described as tartan light...

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Ahead of Scotland's referendum on Thursday, a vivid night-time celebration of the country's most famous pattern style has been unveiled on a farm near Edinburgh. Created by street artists TrenchOne, Elph and Purshone a giant projection covers a house, a barn and group of log cabins in what can only be described as tartan light...

Leyden Farm in West Lothian has been transformed using projection mapping in a project conceived and commissioned by event company mclcreate. The effect is to drench the farm buildings in some particularly adventurous tartan patterning (which reminded me of the old joke about sending an apprentice to the shop for tartan paint – and a left handed hammer, a bubble for the spirit level while they're at it).

The artists – real names Ross Blair, Brian Mcfeely and Craig Robertson – apparently spent months devising the installation and collaborated with filmmaker Mike Guest and musician Jenifer Austin as the art collective Projector Club.

While the majority of the politically-motivated visual statements in recent weeks have made use of the two words at the centre of the Scottish referendum – with the Yes vote seemingly outplaying the No in terms of ambition: see the giant 'Yes' on the rock beneath Edinburgh Castle – the creators claim that the new installation wasn't made in support of either the standpoint and is simply a celebration of Scotland's past and its future.

Also involved with the project was Andy Stentiford (funktion creep); projectionist Jason Vagionakis (mclcreate senior tech); with technical logistics by Stuart Holligan (mclcreate warehouse supervisor).

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Eley Kishimoto graffiti at Brixton tube station http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/eley-kishimoto-brixton-tube-flash http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/eley-kishimoto-brixton-tube-flash#feedback Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:28:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81118

As of this morning, the entrance to Brixton tube station in London boasts a swirling piece of pavement art, courtesy of designers Eley Kishimoto...

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As of this morning, the entrance to Brixton tube station in London boasts a swirling piece of pavement art, courtesy of designers Eley Kishimoto...

Unveiled to coincide with Brixton Design Week, FLASH is the work of Kishimoto and local design studios 2MZ and Studio db.

The piece, which uses one of the duo's trademark patterns, was created using a series of large digitally-cut stencils.

Brixton Design Week is on now and runs until September 21.

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Intense new Jonathan Glazer ad for Canon http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/intense-new-jonathan-glazer-ad-for-canon http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/intense-new-jonathan-glazer-ad-for-canon#feedback Mon, 15 Sep 2014 14:55:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81079

Acclaimed director Jonathan Glazer has shot a dynamic new TV ad for Canon. The spot is part of a campaign for the camera brand by JWT London with the tagline 'Come and See', which also encompasses a website offering information on how to achieve the techniques Glazer's film features yourself...

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Acclaimed director Jonathan Glazer has shot a dynamic new TV ad for Canon. The spot is part of a campaign for the camera brand by JWT London with the tagline 'Come and See', which also encompasses a website offering information on how to achieve the techniques Glazer's film features yourself...

Glazer's ad captures a game of 'Calcico Storico', a historical (and brutal-looking) football game played in Florence in June. Only four teams, from four areas of the city, take part in the tournament. Each team consists of 27 men, all of whom are battling to get a ball over a 4ft high fence at either end of the pitch and score a goal. The tournament takes place on the sand-covered piazza in front of the Santa Croce church, and the prize for the winning team is a cow. The event makes a gripping subject matter for a short film, particularly in Glazer's hands.

Canon's advertising has emphasised the use of its cameras to tell stories for a little while now, and this latest campaign is an extension of this idea. This is the first use of the 'Come and see' tag, however, and alongside Glazer's film on the website, there is also an elegant photographic project showing deer shot at night in Epping Forest. Again, information is given as to how to achieve the photographic effects featured yourself. Visit the website at comeandsee.canon-europe.com.

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A23D film documents making of 3D printed letterpress font http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/a2-3d-film http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/a2-3d-film#feedback Mon, 15 Sep 2014 11:21:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81074

Last week, we published an article on the making of a 3D printed letterpress font, created by A2-Type and London print shop New North Press. A film about the project has now been released online and you can watch it in full below...]]>

Last week, we published an article on the making of a 3D printed letterpress font, created by A2-Type and London print shop New North Press. A film about the project has now been released online and you can watch it in full below...

The 10-minute short premiered at the V&A on September 13 and was made by Adrian Harrison, who has also produced films on fairground sign writing and lettering artist Joby Carter.

As well as documenting the design process, it features a 3D timelapse of letters being printed and a look at New North Press' impressive collection of wood type and letterpress equipment.

As we reported in our blog post, the font will be used in New North Press' letterpress workshops and the studio is also selling a series of fluoro specimen posters on its website.

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hClub 100 list seeks your votes http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/hclub-100-vote http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/hclub-100-vote#feedback Fri, 12 Sep 2014 18:18:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81069

The public vote for this year's Hospital Club hClub100 awards is now open: vote for those who you think are among the most influential and innovative people working across Britain’s creative industries in the past 12 months

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The public vote for this year's Hospital Club hClub100 awards is now open: vote for those who you think are among the most influential and innovative people working across Britain’s creative industries in the past 12 months

London private members' club The Hospital organises the hClub 100 each year in order to try to identify influential and innovative people working across categories including broadcast, fashion, music and advertising. CR editor Patrick Burgoyne was on the panel for the art and design category this year alongside Nancy Durrant, arts commissioning editor and an art critic at The Times and Victoria Siddall, director of Frieze Masters.

As with the other categories, the judges were tasked with selecting a shortlist from some 1000 nominations submitted by the public earlier this year. Each panel chose nine award winners. A 10th place in each category will be selected by a public vote which runs until September 24.

The Art & Design shortlist includes design studio UVA, Carl Burgess of More Soon (who wrote about CG for CR's August issue, photographer Laura Pannack, Universal Everything's Matt Pyke, Tom Evans of BleepBleeps and illustrator Kristjana S Williams.

Nominees for advertising (which CR was not involved in) include Grey ECD Nils Leonard, Nick Farnhill of Poke and directors Ringan Ledwidge and Tom Tagholm.

See the full list here

All 100 finalists will be announced at an exclusive hClub100 awards ceremony taking place in the Hospital Club Studio for the first time on the 8th October 2014,

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Sweet new Guardian ad from BBH London http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/sweet-ad-for-the-guardian-by-bbh-london http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/september/sweet-ad-for-the-guardian-by-bbh-london#feedback Fri, 12 Sep 2014 17:23:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=81068

This sweet new spot from the Guardian will set you up nicely for the weekend. And it's accompanied by some beautiful print work too...

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This sweet new spot from the Guardian will set you up nicely for the weekend. And it's accompanied by some beautiful print work too...

The ad forms part of the Guardian's Own The Weekend campaign, which in previous iterations has taken quite a comedic approach. This spot opts instead for out-and-out charm, with a series of vignettes showing different ways that you can spend the weekend, all set to a sweet musical soundtrack, composed by the creative director on the ad, Michael Russoff. It's all quite lefty, middle-class fare, of course, but as that's the Guardian's core audience, it makes perfect sense.

Accompanying the spot is a lovely piece of print and poster work, featuring a collage of visuals of weekend activities. All the included imagery is taken from the Guardian and Observer picture archive.

Full poster

Detail of poster

The release of the ad ties in with a minor redesign for the paper, which brings elements of the Guardian's digital design into the print offering. Read more about this on Design Week, here.

Credits:
Agency: BBH London
Creative director: Michael Russoff
Creatives: AK Parker, George Brettell
Production company: HLA
Director: Simon Ratigan
Post: The Mill
Illustrator on print work: Peter Quinnell
Typographer: James Townsend, Rob Wilson

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