CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Thu, 24 Apr 2014 17:43:42 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 Cut-out graphics for cut-out show http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/matisse-cutouts-supergraphics-cartlidge-levene http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/matisse-cutouts-supergraphics-cartlidge-levene#feedback Thu, 24 Apr 2014 17:22:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75469

Visitors to Tate Modern can't fail to miss the subject of the gallery's latest blockbuster thanks to some supergraphics created by Cartlidge Levene. A timelapse film shows how the studio's largest signage to date was applied to the gallery for the Matisse Cut-Outs exhibition – while Ian Cartlidge explains how they did it...

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Visitors to Tate Modern can't fail to miss the subject of the gallery's latest blockbuster thanks to some supergraphics created by Cartlidge Levene. A timelapse film shows how the studio's largest signage to date was applied to the gallery for the Matisse Cut-Outs exhibition – while Ian Cartlidge explains how they made it...

Henri Matisse's 'cut-outs', created during the last years of his life, have been brought together in London for the first time in fifty years. Cut from coloured and painted-over paper, the work has a playful, child-like quality but was derived from a process Matisse created due to his failing health. His assistants helped him orientate the large sheets and, having cut out the shapes he wanted, they would then pin them to the walls of his studio at his direction.

In addition to the huge wall pieces in Tate Modern's new show, which include designs made for stained glass, a stand-out exhibit is the full series of pages Matisse created for his 1947 book of prints entitled Jazz; an entire edition of which is laid out, complete with hand-painted text by the artist.

And while Matisse used scissors to cut shapes out of huge, unweildy sheets of paper, Cartlidge Levene had an even larger task on their hands in manoeuvering several oversized pieces of vinyl into position both outside and inside the gallery.

A particularly nice touch is that the vinyl itself is specially made to stick to brickwork – even up close it resembles paintwork.

"The brief was to design 'on-site presence' graphics that leave visitors in no doubt that Matisse Cut-Outs is a show not to be missed!," says Ian Cartlidge.

"This provided a rare opportunity to use the brick elevation as a giant canvas. Normally the artists' names are contained in the lightboxes above the entrances – we wanted it to appear as if Matisse Cut-Outs had exploded out of the lightbox and invaded the elevation above."

But with a project of this scale, how does everything get worked out prior to installation? "We initially designed the graphic onto photos, then we transferred these to scale drawings of the elevations," says Cartlidge. "Then came the setting-out. We would normally provide a setting-out document plus a briefing on-site.

"The 'setting-out' document was straightforward but the on-site briefing was a little more challenging – we couldn't exactly mark out the data on the walls as we couldn't even reach the lowest part of the graphic. The key was determining the start point for each graphic element – tricky as everything is on angles.

"As we couldn't get up to measure, we used the reliable measuring increment of the brick grid. We translated our dimensions to 'numbers of bricks' and gave these instructions to the installation crew high up on the cherry picker – it worked out well!"

While on-site Cartlidge Levene also made a timelapse film of the installation of the graphics which appear over the west entrance to Tate Modern. In the clip below, once the vinyl is applied one of the workmen can be seen 'pushing' it onto the bricks which provides the 'painted on' effect.

Following the film are a few more images of the work close up. The three supergraphics were created by Cartlidge Levene, while all the Matisse exhibition graphics are by Tate.

Matisse: Cut-Outs is at Tate Modern until September 7. See tate.org.uk.

The main riverside entrance to Tate Modern

Inside the Turbine Hall

Above the west entrance to the gallery

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Six New Ads To Watch http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/six-new-ads-to-watch1 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/six-new-ads-to-watch1#feedback Thu, 24 Apr 2014 17:10:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75741

Today's advertising round-up features campaigns for Powerade, the NHL Playoffs, and the Renaissance Photography Prize as well as charity ads for the National Austism Society and St John Ambulance. We open, however, with an amusing anti-bullying spot from VH1...

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Today's advertising round-up features campaigns for Powerade, the NHL Playoffs, and the Renaissance Photography Prize as well as charity ads for the National Austism Society and St John Ambulance. We open, however, with an amusing anti-bullying spot from VH1...

A funny take on a serious subject, the ad is set to a soundtrack of I Will Survive, and features a number of picked-on kids who are already plotting how they will wreak their revenge post-school and in the world of work. Agency: Del Campo Saatchi & Saatchi; ECDs: Maxi Itzkoff, Mariano Serkin; Creative directors: Juan Pablo Lufrano, Ariel Serkin, Dani Minaker, Sebastian Tarazaga; Production company: Landia/Stink; Director: Agustin Alberdi.

This spot forms part of Powerade's World Cup ad campaign. A short documentary compiled mainly of home video footage, it tells the moving story of American athlete Nico Calabria who was born with one leg. Agency: Wieden + Kennedy Amsterdam. ECDs: Mark Bernath, Eric Quennoy; Creative directors: Alvaro Sotomayor, Rosie Bardales; Creatives: Mike Bond, Bernard Hunter; Production company: Caviar; Director: AG Rojas.

Director Steve Cope collaborated with the National Autistic Society to create this film for World Autism Awareness Month. The spot emphasises how autism can cause a heightened sensitivity to sound. Agency: The News. Creative director: Kit Dayaram. Creatives: Stine Hole Mankovsky, Oli Kellet. Production company: Rattling Stick.

Another charity spot now, and it's a hard-hitting one: created by Perth-based The Brand Agency for St John Ambulance Western Australia, it aims to emphasise the importance of knowing basic first aid skills. Creative director: Craig Buchanan; Creative: David Donald; Production company: Penguin Empire; Director: Grant Sputore.

Leo Burnett has created an online campaign for the Renaissance Photography Prize which invites famous photographers including Rankin, Martin Parr and Perou to share the stories behind some of their most famous images. Under the tagline, 'If it's worth taking, it's worth sharing', the photos and stories are shared online at worthtaking.renaissancephotography.org and also on Twitter using the hashtag #worthsharing. Audiences are then encouraged to enter their own photos into the Prize, with all proceeds raised from the competition going to The Lavender Trust. Creative directors: Matt Lee, Pete Heyes; Creatives: Rob Tenconi, Mark Franklin; Design/Typography: Lance Crozier, Marc Donaldson.

We finish with a high-octane sports spot from Arnold Worldwide, Boston for the Boston Bruins at the NHL Playoffs. We've seen full-on sports mayhem in ads before, but the way this spot builds the tension before unleashing the chaos and violence of the game can't help but draw you in. ECDs: Wade Devers, Pete Johnson; Creative directors: Travis Roberton, Greg Almeida.

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An interview with Von http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/von-elsewhere http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/von-elsewhere#feedback Thu, 24 Apr 2014 15:15:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75740

Illustrator Von's latest solo exhibition, Elsewhere, opens at KK Outlet in London next week. We spoke to the artist about the show, his creative influences and balancing commercial and personal work...

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Illustrator Von's latest solo exhibition, Elsewhere, opens at KK Outlet in London next week. We spoke to the artist about the show, his creative influences and balancing commercial and personal work...

Based in London, Von studied illustration and animation at Kingston University and set up his own studio, HelloVon, in 2006. He's since produced work for Nike, Selfridges, Penguin, the New Yorker and the Paralympic Games and has exhibited fine art work in London, New York and Los Angeles, including the beautiful graphite and pencil series Animals and Semblance, a collection of portraits combining traditional and digital image-making techniques.

For his latest exhibition, Elsewhere, Von has created another series of graphite and pencil drawings, this time depicting subjects who are lost in thought. The show includes both large and small-scale artworks and Von has collaborated with Non-Format, HORT, David Pearson and Darren Firth on a set of limited edition exhibition posters,  available to buy on his website.

CR: Tell us a little more about Elsewhere…

V: The 22 originals created for the exhibition explore that involuntary process of slipping away from our surroundings, appearing to others to be completely elsewhere.

The show’s concept all stems from walking into central London and increasingly catching sight of someone in a cafe or office window, totally enveloped in their own world.  It was such a rare, momentary and, on some level, personal thing to witness, it really stuck in my mind.  Moments to ourselves seem to be becoming rarer, particularly living in a city, as we are advertised at practically everywhere, we seem to reach for our smart phones whenever there's a few seconds to kill as a natural reaction now and online, sharing our day-to-day events is almost a pressure.  All this made witnessing those people's lost moments such a fantastic and fragile thing.

CR: How does it relate to or build on your previous series, such as Semblance?

V: It's a development of my Semblance series which also focused on abstract portraiture but more than that, it’s a culmination of a year or so of experiments, mistakes, research and figuring out ways to push what I had established with Semblance, both technically and conceptually.

It is also the first time I have exhibited the smaller, quicker studies alongside larger, more considered pieces. The large pieces are often worked out compositionally in advance but with the studies it's much more off the cuff and instinctive. Naturally, it doesn't always work out but there are twelve of my favourites in the show.

CR: Who are the subjects in your portraits?

V: This show is the first time I've worked with a photographer, in this case the very talented Dan Sully (who is primarily a director) to create my reference images entirely from scratch. It's definitely a key turning point in my fine art work and a process I'd be keen to repeat. The subjects are a mixture of friends and acquaintances: an actor, model, musician, writer and choreographer.



CR: You said all of the works were created with graphite and pencil. What is it you enjoy about working with this medium?

V: Figuring out new ways to push such a simple and limited medium is half the joy for me. In preparation for the show there was lot of experimentation, most of which has made it through to the final pieces to one degree or another. As for divulging what the techniques are, though, people will have to just try and figure it out for themselves…

CR: And what about the collaborative posters? How did they come about?


V: When I had my first solo show in NY back in 2008 I collaborated with Non-Format to create a screen printed show poster which, as well as selling out before the show opened, is still one of my favourite folio pieces.

When this opportunity came along with KK Outlet, I really wanted to do something similar but up the game, which led me to inviting four of my favourite designers, not just one. The only stipulations were that certain basic information and the lead image needed to appear on the design, [but] how and where was entirely up to them. They could crop the artwork, mess with it or totally leave it alone. Whatever suited them.  I'm really happy with the results, not to mention totally humbled to have such a talented and well respected set of designers be involved.



CR: Your work has a very distinctive style. How would you describe it, and who (or what) are your biggest creative influences?

V: I guess a mix of documentary portraiture and surrealism. There's a lot of fascination with structure. I’d say [my biggest influence] is music — the atmospheres, juxtapositions of different sounds, the transition from one note into another, textures, etc. All of those things conjure up very strong visuals to me.

Another major influence is nature - for a long time at the beginning of the process with Elsewhere, I'd walk laps of Dulwich park each morning listening to one album on repeat, which really helped a lot of ideas I've used in the show come out. If I had to pick some visual artists I really like, I’d say Jonathan Glazer, Bernhard Edmaier, Chris Cunningham, Tokujin Yoshioka and Takenobu Igarashi.

CR: You also run a busy studio. Have you been focusing more on your personal work in the run up to the show?

V: When I was approached about doing this show I jumped at the chance. It felt like an age since I had done a solo exhibition due to the last few years being so busy with commercial work. I've had the chance to work with some amazing clients and I've loved it, but working on Elsewhere has been a much relished opportunity to take some time away from that, refine the ideas and experiments I'd been doing alongside day to day work and really push myself again. The past few months working on this have been pretty intense but now I'm coming out the other side I can safely say, through somewhat tired eyes, it has been a really satisfying experience.

CR: How would you say the dynamic between these two elements of your work has changed over the past few years?

V: I've consciously made much more effort with the fine art side of thing, in terms setting up shopvon.com to specifically house that output. [It's] a place for me to release originals, limited edition prints and collector's box sets. I've been really lucky with the reception it's had so far with a number of editions selling out, and it’s definitely helped balance out the commercial and fine art side of things.



CR: Would you ever consider moving solely into fine art?

V: Who knows. All I can say is alongside my commercial work, I will be doing more exhibitions both in the States and here over the next few years, as well as continuing to explore more printing processes through ShopVon and other galleries. At the moment I'm in talks about a solo show in LA early next year and have a print release lined up with a US gallery in the next few months, which is great. Where all that will put me in three to five years I have no clue, but I'm looking forward to finding out.

Elsewhere opens at KK Outlet, 42 Hoxton Square, London N1 6PB on May 1. For details, see shopvon.com or kkoutlet.com

Images: Von

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Pick Me Up 2014 opens at Somerset House http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/pickmeup-2014 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/pickmeup-2014#feedback Thu, 24 Apr 2014 13:13:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75723

Graphic art fair Pick Me Up opened at London’s Somerset House last night. As usual, there's far too much on show to cover in a single blog post, but here’s a look at a few things that caught our eye...]]>

Graphic art fair Pick Me Up opened at London’s Somerset House last night. As usual, there's far too much on show to cover in a single blog post, but here’s a look at a few things that caught our eye...

This year’s event is open until May 5. Part exhibition, part craft fair, it features work by both new and established artists and the programme includes daily workshops and demonstrations.

Downstairs is a gallery showcasing work from this year's Selects, four of which - Carine Brancowitz, Lynnie Zulu, Ed Cheverton and Thibaud Herem - were featured in our February illustration issue.

Herem's work includes a beautifully detailed drawing of St Pancras station, while Cheverton's display features some charming 3D jazz figures:

There's also a striking display by Linda Linko, some lovely lettering from Hey Studio and a series of paintings by Camberwell graduate Alice Tye:

 

 

As well as colourful displays from Billy (Alex Godwin), Jessica Daas and Annu Kilpeläinen.

Upstairs is a range of installations from collectives including a group of creatives from football website The Illustrated Game, whose display includes a custom foosball table, a matchday programme hut and a range of illustrated football zines and prints.

 

 

Camberwell collective Olio's installation, Build, includes a drawing corner and a selection of prints and 3D items, including ceramics, t-shirts, mugs and a tool set:

 

 

And Letterproeftuin are demonstrating their mobile print shop The Smallest Printing Company, allowing guests to make their own cards.

I also liked Lana Hughes, Margaux Carpentier and Rory Elphick's colourful Animaux Circus display, which includes a selection of animal themed prints and tropical signs to paint, as well as The Artomatic - a twist on the traditional passport photobooth in which visitors step inside and are given an anonymous artwork instead of a photo:

 

 

Also upstairs are a series of rooms showcasing work from illustration agencies and galleries: Outline Artists' display includes fabric designs for Heal's (below, by Hvass & Hannibal), some new prints by Ed Monaghan, also one of Pick Me Up's Selects this year, and some beautiful artwork from Kristjana Williams. Jessica Daas has also created a jungle-themed print and mural:

 


 

Handsome Frank’s features prints by Malika Favre and Jean Jullien (see his Thugs print, below), and this monochrome rug by Lesley Barnes, which will set you back around £950:

 



 

And one of my favourite items in Brighton gallery Unlimited's showcase was this three colour alphabet by Steve Wilson, which is on sale as a print and on individual postcards:

 


 

Beach London's display includes work from Malarky, crosstitch by Pete Fowler, spherical drawings by James Jarvis and prints depicting scenes from ustwo's beautifully designed app, Monument Valley.

 

 

Other interesting objects for sale include I Am Acrylic's island-themed jewellery and mini sculptures, Jack Hudson's practical sculptures and Malarky's take on porcelain dogs:

 

 

There's plenty more to see, too and a range of one-off events such as a Cut & Paste workshop with Anthony Burrill, a blind drawing session with Sarah Maycock and an interactive game run by graphic artist Melvin Galapon and choreographers Marquez & Zangs.

Blink Ink directors will also be hosting talks and screenings this weekend, and discussing animations techniques and ads for Cravendale and John Lewis. For details, see somersethouse.org

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Warhol digital artworks found on floppy disks from 1985 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/andy-warhol-amiga-art http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/andy-warhol-amiga-art#feedback Thu, 24 Apr 2014 11:29:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75726

A team from Carnegie Mellon University's Computer Club in the US has found a series of previously unknown digital artworks created by Andy Warhol for Amiga Computers in 1985 and stored on floppy disks...

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Andy Warhol, Andy2, 1985, ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visuals Arts, Inc., courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum

A team from Carnegie Mellon University's Computer Club in the US has found a series of previously unknown digital artworks created by Andy Warhol for Amiga Computers in 1985 and stored on floppy disks...

The team consisting of artists, computing experts, and museum professionals discovered 12 experiments by Warhol on disks stored in the archives of The Andy Warhol Museum.

According to the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry (FRSCI) at CMU, the artworks were a result of a commission by Commodore International in the mid-80s.

Keen to demonstrate the graphic arts capabilities of the Amiga 1000 personal computer (shown at bottom of post), Commodore approached the artist to create a series of digital pieces on prototype Amiga hardware and with state-of-the-art software imaging tools.

Andy Warhol, Campbell's, 1985, ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visuals Arts, Inc., courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum

The project began when New York-based artist Cory Arcangel first learned of Warhol's Amiga experiments via a YouTube video of the Commodore Amiga product launch.

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With the support of Carnegie Museum of Art curator Tina Kukielski, Arcangel then approached the Andy Warhol Museum in December 2011 about restoring the Amiga hardware in the museum's possession.

He then contacted CMU art professor and director of the FRSCI, Golan Levin, who offered a grant to support the investigation – and Levin also introduced the artist to the university's Computer Club, which boats expertise in 'retrocomputing', the restoration of vintage computers. However, after working on the disks, the club discovered that even reading the information stored on them risked damaging their contents

According to FRSCI, most of the disks were "system and application diskettes" onto which Warhol had apparently saved his own data (including files such as 'campbells.pic' and 'marilyn1.pic') in completely unknown formats.

Andy Warhol, Venus, 1985, ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visuals Arts, Inc., courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum

The Club persevered, however, and managed to resurrect 28 digital images that were verified by the Warhol museum (eleven of which feature Warhol's signature). The images were made using processes such as 'pattern flood fills', 'palletized color', and 'copy-paste collage'.

Throughout the investigation the team's efforts have been documented by the Hillman Photography Initiative and the resulting short film, Trapped: Andy Warhol's Amiga Experiments, will premiere on Saturday May 10 at Carnegie Library Lecture Hall in Pittsburgh (7pm).

According to FRSCI, the screening will be followed by a conversation with some of the team's key players, including artists Arcangel and Levin; Michael Dille, who just completed his PhD in robotics at CMU, and Keith A Bare of the CMU Computer Club; and outside guest Jon Ippolito, a professor of digital media curation at the University of Maine.

The Trapped documentary will then be available online at nowseethis.org on May 12.

A detailed report (PDF) about the CMU Computer Club's retrocomputing work on the Warhol/Amiga image recovery project can be found here. The works were extracted from the disks by members of the CMU Computer Club, CMU's Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry (FRSCI), the Hillman Photography Initiative at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA), and Arcangel. See warhol.org.

Commodore Amiga computer equipment used by Andy Warhol 1985-86, courtesy of The Andy Warhol Museum

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Beautiful Nike India cricket ad http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/beautiful-nike-india-cricket-ad http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/beautiful-nike-india-cricket-ad#feedback Thu, 24 Apr 2014 11:25:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75724

This striking spot from Nike India features 1,440 cricketers and demonstrates the love for the sport in the country, whether you be adult or child, amateur or professional...

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This striking spot from Nike India features 1,440 cricketers and demonstrates the love for the sport in the country, whether you be adult or child, amateur or professional...

The spot is constructed from thousands of still images, painstakingly edited together. According to the agency behind the spot, JWT Bangalore, the images were crowdsourced from cricket grounds across India, with 225,000 shots featured in the finished ad.

Credits:
Agency: JWT Bangalore
Creative director: Senthil Kumar
Creatives: Dhruv Warrior, Shri Pendakur
Production company: 1st December Films
Editor: Priyank Premkumar

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Art de toilette http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/serpentine-fragrance http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/serpentine-fragrance#feedback Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:25:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75678

London's Serpentine Galleries have teamed up with Comme des Garçons to develop their own fragrance which is, apparently, "light, yet deceivingly complex". The bottle features artwork by Tracey Emin...

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London's Serpentine Galleries have teamed up with Comme des Garçons to develop their own fragrance which is, apparently, "light, yet deceivingly complex". The bottle features artwork by Tracey Emin...

According to the Serpentine, the unisex fragrance takes the galleries' location in Kensington Gardens as inspiration: so it's a crafty blend of historical parkland with a hint of the modern city.

More formally it is "composed of grass, leaves, pollen (galbanum, iris leaf), oxygene (aldehyde, ozone), asphalt (black musks, nutmeg), labdanum and smoked cedar with a little bit of pollution (benzoin, juniper wood, gaïac wood)."

We think Emin's text on the bottle reads "The grass / The trees / The lake" which does, despite the "little bit of pollution", at least make this artful fragrance sound like it might be very pleasant on the nose.

A 50ml bottle will set you back £56 and all proceeds from the sale of the fragrance go to supporting the Serpentine Galleries' programmes.

Serpentine is on sale from April 28. To buy it, visit serpentinegalleries.org.

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What's On http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/whats-on-2304 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/whats-on-2304#feedback Wed, 23 Apr 2014 16:15:00 +0000 Antonia Wilson http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75666

CR's pick of exhibitions, design events and creative activities for the week ahead including Paris Photo in LA, Hyères Festival of Fashion & Photography, Introduction to Letterpress with New North Press in London, Motion Factory behind-the-scenes animation exhibition in Paris, publishing symposium Art-Information at the ICA, and Off Life's #QuickDraw Live event in London...

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CR's pick of exhibitions, design events and creative activities for the week ahead including Paris Photo in LA, Hyères Festival of Fashion & Photography, Introduction to Letterpress with New North Press in London, Motion Factory behind-the-scenes animation exhibition in Paris, publishing symposium Art-Information at the ICA, and Off Life's #QuickDraw Live event in London...


Paris Photo Los Angeles
Paramount Pictures Studios
25-27 Apr

The second US edition of the celebrated art fair, with exhibitions of contemporary and historical work by established and emerging artists, presented by international galleries and art book dealers, set against the backdrop of the vintage sound stages of Paramount Pictures. The main event includes new solo shows and installations, Young Gallery exhibitions, and bookseller projects on show in the New York Street Backlot, a film set replica of New York City's streets.

In addition to the main show, the Sound & Vision series includes conversations with artists and curators, plus film and video screenings of work seeking to push the boundaries between photography and moving image. There's also book signings, a tribute to Dennis Hopper and his photographic work, and a rare unveiling of the LAPD Photo Archives dating from 1920s - 1960s.

www.parisphoto.com/losangeles

 


Hyères Festival of Fashion & Photography
Villa Noailles, Hyères
28 Apr - 25 May

This annual event in Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur showcases the work of a shortlist of photographers and fashion designers at Villa Noailles, a modernist mansion in the hills above Hyères. Alongside the competition there are conferences, concerts, and other exhibitions from former winners and established artists and designers, including Steve Hiett, Jean-Michel Bertin, Kenzo, Oliver Sieber and Marc Turlan. Keep an eye on the CR blog for more on the festival later this week.

villanoailles-hyeres.com/hyeres2014


Introduction to Letterpress
New North Press Studio, London
26 Apr (10am - 5.30pm)

Hands-on letterpress workshop, for anyone after beginner's level practical knowledge of the craft, from composition (hand-setting, spacing and locking-up type), to printing (inking and pulling the press), using a library of over 700 wood and metal fonts.

www.new-north-press.co.uk

 

Motion Factory: les ficelles du monde animé (tricks of the animation world)
La Gaîté Lyrique, Paris
24 Apr - 10 Aug

The digital arts centre showcases the work of 15 animation directors, with stop-motion short films and adverts, behind-the-scenes footage on storyboarding, model and figurine making, set building, collage, and other techniques and production methods from sketching to clay modelling, puppets to digital elements. A participatory stop-motion film project runs alongside, being created frame-by-frame for the duration of the exhibition, on Tuesday evenings.

Work comes from directors Kyle Bean, Kijek & Adamski, Johnny Kelly, Pic Pic André, Peter Sluszka Jamie Caliri & Alex Juhasz, Sumo Science (Will Stud & Ed Patterson), Sean Pecknold, Kangmin Kim, Joseph Mann, Andrew Thomas Huang, Hayley Morris, Elliot Dear, Emma de Swaef & Marc James Roels, Mikey Please, Conor Finnegan and Yves Geleyn.

www.gaite-lyrique.net/en/node/6058

 


Art-Information: Editorial Strategies, Text-based Formats, Publishing Contexts
ICA, London
26 Apr (11.30am - 6pm)

One day event exploring publishing within contemporary art and curatorial practice. Talks cover a variety of topics including formats, distribution, editorialship, art direction, publishing as practice, changing notions in authorship and reader participation, and interactive digital publishing, with some speakers drawing on archival Pop strategies and editorial engagements of 1960s conceptual artists.

www.ica.org.uk

 


Off Life: #QuickDraw Live
House of Illustration, London
24 Apr (8pm)

Previously a Twitter event, #QuickDraw from Off Life street press comic and new talent platform, moves into the new House of Illustration Gallery, for an evening of fast-paced illustration. Participants work with top comic artists to create work around set themes, with final pieces projected or hung around the gallery and tweeted out. You can still take part online, responding with artwork around themes on Twitter with #QuickDraw, and work could appear at the live event. Plus drinks and music throughout the evening as part of the gallery's housewarming season.

www.offlife.co.uk/quickdraw
www.houseofillustration.org.uk


To submit events for consideration, please email whatson@creativereview.co.uk

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Byline magazine launches http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/the-times-byline-magazine http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/the-times-byline-magazine#feedback Wed, 23 Apr 2014 11:31:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75620

A new quarterly magazine for The Times' Times+ membership aims to offer an insight into the newspaper's news gathering process and is designed and art directed by Design by St...

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Cover portrait: Caitlin Moran by Kate Peters

A new quarterly magazine for The Times' Times+ membership aims to offer an insight into the newspaper's news gathering process and is designed and art directed by Design by St...

According to the studio, the brief for the new title was that it "look and feel, bold, warm, fresh and different to the usual communication expected by members but retain a sense of Times style". The Times+ membership offers The Times and The Sunday Times' readers exclusive offers, events and Q&As with the newspapers' journalists.

Design by St decided on the format and paper for Byline first, designing the magazine around those parameters. Here, Steve Fenn explains the thinking behind this direction, and the subsequent typography and illustration choices that the the studio made.

CR: Your design started with sourcing the paper first – in terms of print projects you've worked on, is that unusual? Why was it important to settle on that aspect of the job before doing anything else?

Steve Fenn: I think that's how we would like to think about every editorial print project we do, though it's not always possible. This was a nice chance to start something from scratch so it was important to think about it from the bottom up as a product on the whole.

It was important that this felt like a quality product and not just an editorial supplement, that was part of the brief. We were keen to try and print it sheet fed rather than web offset, which we knew would help greatly with quality but be tricky due to the scale of the run (265,000).

We worked with Alan Flack at Principal Colour to get to a comfortable and different reading size that was do-able at this print spec; he helped us source a nice uncoated sheet (Antalis Cyclus Offset) that we could order the amount of paper we needed at a making size (made to order, bespoke for our mag size).

So, in short, we started with the size and the paper so we could get a feel for what we were dealing with before we moved onto the grid and type, as we were punching in the dark without the basics in place first – and the feel and print quality of the product was important so seemed the best place to start.

CR: Can you tell us about the type palette you've used here? What faces have you brought in, and how do they relate back to The Times?

SF: We had to stick to Times licensed fonts due to budgets etc. so we knew we would always retain a sense of that style. We looked at various other Time magaziness like Eureka, The Sunday Times Magazine etc. to ensure we found a way of using the set in a quite different way.

We used the Bureau Grotesque, in upper and lower case for headings as that had a nice personality and felt quite different, then we went big and bold with the Stag Sans on the leader features for some pace and variety, which again felt varied from other Times publications.

This contrasting with the more traditional Times styles for the text and the stand firsts / pull quotes worked well. Then it was just about the finer details following a system.

And for the masthead typography, we found a black weight of Bureau Grotesque that The Times didn't have. We felt it needed that difference on the cover, one that was still able to relate well to the upper and lower case Bureau Grotesque and caps Stag Sans on the inside.

CR: We know Robert Hanson's work well at CR – he created the cover of our London Underground special issue last year. Can you tell me about the icon set he was asked to create for the project?

SF: We've worked with Robert on quite a few projects, so we know he had the perfect brain for what we wanted. We realised we needed to add a bit of warmth and wit to the mag, so our brief to him was to summarise in one hit the subject of the four leading features and tie in the main aim of the mag, to give readers an exclusive insight to the news gathering process.

We then went through lots of tiny scribbles with him to distill them down to the simplest graphic forms, that would be readable at the size. Two of them ('lead interview' and 'a day in the life') will be regulars so we can continue to use them. They ended up working brilliantly, Robert is always great to work with.

CR: Is this a project which is now handed over to someone in-house, or are you taking on the design and art direction going forward?

SF: The plan is to continue with the design art direction going forward. As with all the magazines we do, we always aim to develop and improve things issue by issue so no doubt the next one will present new challenges, but we have the structure in place and the tone of voice has been established, it will be about elaborating on that and moving forward to bring any new editorial ideas to life in the same vein.

Illustration in issue 1: Robert Hanson (icons), Marcus Butt. Print: Principal Colour. More from Design by St at designbyst.com

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Designs of the Year category winners announced http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/design-of-the-year-2014-category-winners http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/april/design-of-the-year-2014-category-winners#feedback Wed, 23 Apr 2014 10:44:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=75641

The Design Museum has announced the category winners in the 2014 Designs of the Year Awards, which include the Portable Eye Examination Kit (PEEK) in the digital section, The Seaboard Grand piano keyboard in product and James Bridle's Drone Shadows project in graphics (shown above)...

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The Design Museum has announced the category winners in the 2014 Designs of the Year Awards, which include the Portable Eye Examination Kit (PEEK) in the digital section, The Seaboard Grand piano keyboard in product and James Bridle's Drone Shadows project in graphics (shown above)...

The seven category winners provide the list of projects from which the overall Design of the Year is chosen – and announced on June 30 this year. As ever, there are some intriguing choices, not least because of the political charge running through the work which has topped the graphics category.

James Bridle's ongoing project via booktwo.org is a series of installations which consist of simple outlines of unmanned 'drone' aircraft at a 1:1 scale. Since 2012 the drawings, which make the unnervingly invisible 'visible', have been created in various locations from Turkey to the US. (More on the series at Bridle's site, here.)

As judge Frith Kerr commented, the project "demonstra[tes] the power of graphic design, the simple outline requires no caption, no text, no explanation. Like a reverse conjuror he makes the invisible visible, this project is as far reaching as it is uncompromising."

Interestingly, chair of the judges Ekow Eshun also added that, "We thought it was an important piece of work and we also thought it enabled graphics as a category to really expand, and to ask new questions in new ways."

It certainly does that – and that's no bad thing – but just what "expand" means here is a moot point. If the aim is that the graphics category should look to include less commercial projects and more art-informed personal practice, then the success Bridle's provocative work is certainly a move in that direction.

The Designs of the Year exhibition is on at the Design Museum until August 25. The overall winner will be announced on June 30. More at designmuseum.org. Our report from the opening of the show – including a look at the brilliant exhibition graphics by OK-RM – is here.

Here are the other winners for the remaining six categories in the Designs of the Year 2014:

ARCHITECTURE: HEYDAR ALIYEV CENTER, BAKU, AZERBAIJAN
Designed by Zaha Hadid and Patrik Schumacher.

"Elaborate undulations, folds and inflections modify this plaza surface into an architectural landscape that performs a multitude of functions," say the Design Museum.

"An intoxicatingly beautiful building by the most brilliant architect at the height of her office's powers. It's swooning fluid on the outside and inside, belieing its size and complexity." Piers Gough, CZWG Architects LLP

DIGITAL: PEEK (PORTABLE EYE EXAMINATION KIT)
Designed by Dr Andrew Bastawrous, Stewart Jordan, Dr Mario Giardini, Dr Iain Livingstone.

"A smartphone-based system for comprehensive eye examinations, PEEK is easy to use, affordable and portable, meaning that it can bring eye care to even the remotest of settings."

"What's great about PEEK is that being digital helps it do things that we couldn't do before. It's a portable optician – the camera can look at your eyes, the flash from the camera can hit the back of your eye and get a picture, you can use it as an eye test sight card, and you can then send the results to wherever you want in the world. It also feels like it can scale, you can get the kit to millions of people really quickly in one go – another advantage of digital. PEEK is enabling teachers in schools to test the eyes of kids without having to go to an optician and that feels like a really good use of digital technology." Ben Terrett, Government Digital Service

FASHION: PRADA S/S14
Designed by Miuccia Prada.

"Pop-art prints meet sporty details and structured shapes in this boldly coloured, powerful collection. Vogue said of the show ‘By next summer we'll wonder what we ever wore before.’"

"Prada's SS14 collection loudly declares the joy of being a modern woman. It mixes colours, textures, and paintings to leapfrog over the world of tasteful bland fashion. This is serious clothing that doesn't take itself seriously." Frith Kerr, Studio Frith

FURNITURE: PRO CHAIR FAMILY
Designed by Konstantin Grcic.

"Featuring state-of-the-art ergonomics and pioneering design, the construction of the chair not only allows movement in all directions, but actively stimulates it thereby promoting healthier sitting."

"No one on the jury had to argue the case for this exceptional chair - we just had to sit in it. Instantly its effect on the body is tangible and the mind can be satisfied with the balance struck between its material finesse, presence and purpose. It should absolutely shake up the educational sector and give students a truly happier experience in the classroom because it is seriously comfortable and joyous without risk of becoming a cartoon." Kim Colin, Industrial Facility

PRODUCT: THE SEABOARD GRAND
Designed by Roland Lamb and Hong-Yeul Eom.

"The Seaboard is a reinvention of the piano keyboard, reimagining the keys as soft waves that enable continuous and discrete real-time, tactile control of sound through three-dimensional hand gestures. The design combines contemporary minimalism and traditional handcrafted quality."

"This intriguing new digital instrument is the first I've seen that departs from an analogue piano typology and adds something new via its surface interface and design – lending some new musical freedom within a very controlled aesthetic. As a result of its design, the player knows the instrument can do the 'something else' that digital can uniquely provide, that an analogue piano doesn't. Apparently it's very intuitive for musicians and makes experimentation easy – I think we all enjoyed having a go." Kim Colin, Industrial Facility

TRANSPORT: XL1 CAR
Designed by Volkswagen.

"The world’s the most efficient liquid-fuelled production car; it requires only 8.4 PS to sustain a constant 100kph on a level surface in still air, a speed the car can reach from rest in 12.7 seconds."

"Here is a car that seems like it's come out of a dream of the future, it's refined, it's elegant, it can go for miles and miles on a single tank of petrol and it looks beautiful, dangerous almost, in its dramatic shapes and lines. Nothing has gone to waste here - all of this is about going as far as you can on as little as possible. It succeeds as a concept for what a car could be, for almost what a car should be in the future, except it exists now.' Ekow Eshun, writer, journalist and broadcaster, Chair of the jury.

The Designs of the Year 2014 jury:

  • Ben Terrett, Government Digital Service
  • Ekow Eshun, writer, journalist and broadcaster - Chair of the jury
  • Frith Kerr, Studio Frith
  • Kim Colin, Industrial Facility
  • Piers Gough, CZWG Architects LLP
  • Tina Gaudoin, Acting Editor in Chief of Elle Decoration and independent fashion journalist

Previous Design of the Year Winners:

  • 2013 GOV.UK – UK Government website by GDS
  • 2012 London 2012 Olympic Torch, by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby
  • 2011 Plumen 001 by Samuel Wilkinson and Hulger
  • 2010 Folding Plug by Min-Kyu Choi
  • 2009 Barack Obama Poster by Shepard Fairey
  • 2008 One Laptop Per Child by Yves Béhar
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