CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Fri, 22 May 2015 16:49:54 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 There are many ways to make a photobook http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/self-publish-be-happy-at-offprint http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/self-publish-be-happy-at-offprint#feedback Fri, 22 May 2015 15:06:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89949

Self Publish, Be Happy, the London-based outfit which celebrates the art of the self-published photobook, is holding a special project space at the Offprint art publishing fair at Tate Modern this weekend. It aims to inspire visitors to have a go at making their own books – using all manner of photographic processes...

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Self Publish, Be Happy, the London-based outfit which celebrates the art of the self-published photobook, is holding a special project space at the Offprint art publishing fair at Tate Modern this weekend. It aims to inspire visitors to have a go at making their own books – using all manner of photographic processes...

Curated by SPBH founder Bruno Ceschel the space will host numerous events involving contemporary photographers. Visitors will be able to create their own temporary tattoo using an image from the collection of photographer Thomas Mailaender. His Fun Tattoo Parlor will be up and running enabling visitors to wear some of his work on their bodies.

Artist Antony Cairns [work shown below] will be, according to SPBH, "hacking old Kindles bought on eBay and making them into photobooks. Arvida Byström and Maja Malou Lyse will lead a selfie-stick aerobics class, while Japanese artists Daisuke Yokota [shown above] and Hiroshi Takizawah will print a book using an experimental process that uses wax, cement and iron powder."

 

There will also be workshops on risographs and 'zine-making with Maya Rochat and Col~Late and even some "cathartic booksmoking" from Melinda Gibson and "laughter therapy" by Dominic Hawgood. Ceschel is also bringing in a bookshop, a screening room and a speaker's corner where visitors can talk about a book that they love.

The space itself – which is made entirely of readymade materials with 300 plastic container stacks used to make the walls – is designed by Ana Varela and Philippe Albert Lefebvre, while Antonio de Luca has produced the graphics. The entire event will be streamed live via YouTube and hosted on the SPBH website.

In the five years it has been running, SPBH has collected more than 1,000 publications and has produced many workshops, talks and projects.

To date, SPBH has organised events at a number of institutions in London (The Photographer's Gallery, ICA, Whitechapel Gallery) and abroad (C/O Berlin, Printed Matter in NYC, MiCamera in Milan). Recently it has published books by artists Lucas Blalock, Lorenzo Vitturi, Gareth McConnell and Matthew Connor. A book titled Self Publish, Be Happy by Bruno Ceschel will be published by Aperture in October 2015.

Offprint London
Tate Modern Turbine Hall
May 22-25 2015

Friday, 18.00 - 20.00
Saturday, 12.00 - 20.00
Sunday, 12.00 - 18.00
Monday, 12.00 - 18.00

The Self Publish, Be Happy Project Space is kindly supported by Tate Modern, Plastor and David Solo. For further information about the programme visit selfpublishbehappy.com.

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Wordplay: typographic installations from Monotype http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/monotype-wordplay http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/monotype-wordplay#feedback Fri, 22 May 2015 11:45:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89916

A series of typographic installations were unveiled in Clerkenwell this week, courtesy of Monotype and Clerkenwell Design Week. Lettering-based artworks include a wooden bench sculpted in the shape of Neue Haas Unica, an anamorphic mural in Clarendon and a lovely use of Festival of Britain typeface Festival Titling.

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A series of typographic installations were unveiled in Clerkenwell this week, courtesy of Monotype and Clerkenwell Design Week. Lettering-based artworks include a wooden bench sculpted in the shape of Neue Haas Unica, an anamorphic mural in Clarendon and a lovely use of Festival of Britain typeface Festival Titling alongside vintage artwork from the Museum of London.

Titled Wordplay, the outdoor display is made up of seven installations in different locations around Clerkenwell. Each uses a different material and a different typeface from Monotype's library.

Celebrate, on the aptly named Sans Walk, uses archive imagery from the Museum of London, including vintage maps of Clerkenwell and the surrounding area, Festival of Britain artwork, a painting of nearby St Paul's and one of Sidney Paget's Sherlock Holmes illustrations for The Strand magazine. The featured typeface is Phillip Boydell's Festival Titling, created in 1950 as the official type for the Festival of Britain. Letters were cut by hand from sheets of vinyl, which were printed with illustrations and fixed to the brick wall using a heat gun.

 

Sebastian Cox has constructed a lovely bench using Toshi Omagari's Neue Haas Unica, made from American curly maple and tulipwood:

 

Manou Bendan and Jan Mohammed used Clarendon to create this anamorphic mural, painted in temporary chalk in Passing Alley:

 

Sally Hogarth designed Discover, which is cut from fibre cement and uses a repeating pattern in Gill Sans (the word discover is projected on to the ground around midday as sun shines through the negative space)

 

Milton Glaser's Stencil typeface was used to create this installation above the Dovetail pub on Jerusalem Passage, which is cut from Appleplec, a sheet of plastic embedded with LEDs to give a soft glow at night:

 

And Edward Johnston’s ITC Johnston was used to create Experience, an installation on Clerkenwell Road made out of machine perforated metal sheets. The display is hard to read from a distance (particularly given the volume of passing traffic), but we're told was subject to strict planning controls - Monotype initially planned to place letters on top of the wall they are currently fixed to, but the idea was deemed too dangerous by the council due to trains passing underneath.

Image by Sophie Mutevelian

 

The final installation is See, also designed by Hogarth, which features several mirrored columns printed with the letters 'S' 'E' 'E' in various typefaces. Hogarth says she wanted to play with perspectives - columns appear to merge with the ground and each projects several views of the surrounding park and letters on facing columns.

 

Installations are in place until this weekend, and Monotype has set up a website documenting each design and its location at monotype.com/wordplay, as well as teaser videos showing how they were made.

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PG Tips' refreshing rebrand http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/pg-tips-rebrand http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/pg-tips-rebrand#feedback Fri, 22 May 2015 10:39:00 +0000 Patrick Burgoyne http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89947

You can't get much more mainstream than PG Tips, which makes Jones Knowles Ritchie's clean, crisp and witty rebrand all the more welcome

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You can't get much more mainstream than PG Tips, which makes Jones Knowles Ritchie's clean, crisp and witty rebrand all the more welcome

JKR has taken what was looking a pretty tired brand, loaded with the extraneous and generic messaging beloved of major brand packaging, and stripped it back to its essentials – perhaps, after Turner Duckworth's landmark project, this should be known in the design industry as 'doing a Coke'.

 

 

Where previously (see above) 3D type in some kind of sunburst treatment sat above a photorealistic tea plantation, the new packaging has a much simpler, stronger flatter logo.

 

 

There's a lovely overprint effect where the P and the G overlap to form a tea-leaf shape. Above them sits the famous monkey, now transformed into a witty mark. So althoough things have been cleaned up, the brand retains its warmth and the humour that it has long been known for.

 

 

JKR say the interplay of the red and green will be developed into a wider visual language for the brand.

 

It's a refreshing, beautifully crafted approach. I did have one thought though, particularly after seeing this shot – of course the dimensions are different but doesn't this pack look a bit like a packet of cigarettes?

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D&AD 2015: the winners http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/dad http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/dad#feedback Fri, 22 May 2015 10:00:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89898

The winners of this year's D&AD Awards were announced at a ceremony in London last night, with juries awarding five black pencils, four white and 44 yellow. Here's our round-up of the most successful projects and agencies...]]>

The winners of this year's D&AD Awards were announced at a ceremony in London last night, with juries awarding five black pencils, four white and 44 yellow. Here's our round-up of the most successful projects and agencies...

This year's black pencils awarded TV spots, idents, radio campaigns and branding - unsurprisingly, Leo Burnett received one for its Like a Girl campaign for Always, which has been viewed over 57 million times on YouTube and was arguably this year's most talked about spot. It was also the most awarded project of the night, receiving a further two yellow pencils, three graphite and two wood.

 

4creative also received a black pencil for its brilliantly crafted on-screen idents, which were shot using custom equipment to create a moving film-strip effect and inspired by scenes from classic movies (read our interview with ManvsMachine's Mike Alderson about the making of them here):

 

As did Marcel Worldwide for Inglorious Fruits & Vegetables (awarded in the direct integrated campaigns category), which encourages shoppers to eat misshapen produce in an attempt to reduce food waste:

 

 

 

 

 

And Made Thought's elegant G.F Smith rebrand, which saw the paper company's previous logo replaced with two new marques and a bespoke humanist sans typeface:

 

New Zealand agency Colenso BBDO received a black pencil too for K9FM: a radio channel for dogs to promote Pedigree, which broadcast soothing music and messages for pets left alone at home.

 

White pencils were awarded to Don't Panic London for Everything is NOT awesome, a scathing film for Greenpeace urging Lego to end its partnership with Shell, which used the brand's own toys to highlight the potentially devastating consequences of an oil spill (the film led to over 1 million people signing a Greenpeace petition to back the campaign, and Lego announced a few weeks later that it would not be renewing its partnership with the oil company):

 

Droga5 also received a white for Honey Maid campaign This is Wholesome - a sweet if sentimental celebration of American diversity with films showcasing a two-dad family, a military family, a blended family and an interracial family. The ad was watched by 1.5 million people in a day, and followed by another film highlighting some of the more extreme reactions to it on social media, arranging print outs of hateful comments into the word love.

 

GGH Lowe/Grabarz & Partner in Germany was awarded a white pencil for its clever anti-fascism campaign for ZDK Gesellschaft Demokratische Kultur, which tricked Neo-Nazis into raising money for Exit Deutschland, an organisation that helps people leave extremist groups. The stunt subverted an annual far-right extremist march through the town by asking local residents and business owners to sponsor the extremists, donating 10 Euros to Exit Deutchsland for every metre they walked. Walkers were greeted with rainbow coloured banners sporting slogans such as ‘If only the Fuhrer knew” and a sign at the finish line thanking them for their donations. The project raised 10,000 Euros for the charity and a film of the stunt has had over one million views online.

 

Lowe China received the final white pencil for its powerful print campaign for Buick encouraging people to drive safely. The ads featured victims of traffic accidents holding up safety signs, and was also awarded a Gold at Cannes Lions last year.

 

A record 847 pencils were given out this year - the most awarded agency was R/GA (also creative agency of the year in the CR Annual), receiving two yellow pencils plus several graphite and wood for its work with Beats by Dre, Google and Equinox. Always' parent company Procter & Gamle was the most awarded client, while Somesuch & Co was the most successful production company, winning a yellow pencil for Honda ad, The Other Side. Design Bridge was the most awarded design consultancy, picking up four graphite and two wood pencils for projects including the Fortum & Mason Handmade Collection and Tanqueray No. Ten gin packaging.

 

The President Award went to Margaret Calvert, who will forever be associated with her work with Jock Kinneir on  British road signage and whose former pupils at the RCA include Jonathan Barnbrook, Daniel Eatock and founders of GBH, Graphic Thought Facility and Why Not Associates.

Brooklyn-based photographer Jeff Brown, who cites David Lynch as one of his biggest influences, received the new next photographer award in partnership with Getty:

 

And Vania Heymann won next director for music video Mayokero, a two-minute film which brings dozens of iconic album covers to life. Awards jury member Sean Thompson praised Heymann for embracing the ridiculous "and bringing a simple, fresh idea to life in film":

 

For a full list of pencil winners, credits and more info see dandad.org

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Living Mural transforms Sydney Opera House http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/universal-everything-living-mural-sydney-opera-house http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/universal-everything-living-mural-sydney-opera-house#feedback Fri, 22 May 2015 09:15:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89930

As part of the annual Vivid Sydney festival the huge ‘sails’ of the Sydney Opera House are transformed into an artist's canvas. This year, a project conceived by UK studio Universal Everything completely illuminates the building with a 15-minute animation sequence made by 22 different artists…

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As part of the annual Vivid Sydney festival the huge ‘sails’ of the Sydney Opera House are transformed into an artist's canvas. This year, a project conceived by UK studio Universal Everything completely illuminates the building with a 15-minute animation sequence made by 22 different artists…

Living Mural was unveiled around an hour ago (at 6pm Sydney time – check Twitter for images of the project as it’s happening live), and has already seen the Opera House display a round of some 31 hand-drawn animations designed by a group of international artists and studios.

Photo via Syd Cove Oyster Bar (@SCOysterBar)

 

Universal Everything developed a ‘narrative’ comprised of the different 30-second ‘sequences’ – each one, says the studio, is described in a keyword such as ‘float’, ‘spin’, ' twist' or ‘ricochet’.

Twenty-two artists each then responded to a specific sequence, with sound designer and regular Univeral Everything-collaborator, Freefarm, creating a bespoke audio soundtrack for the 31 scenes.

This video gives an idea of what the animations look like live – while a full list of all the animators involved is at the bottom of the post:

 

The installation will run for three weeks as part of the Vivid LIVE series of music events which take over the Opera House – the centrepiece of the Vivid Sydney festival of “light, music and ideas” – until June 8. Universal Everything were commissioned by Sydney Opera House Trust as the guest artist for this year’s ‘Lighting The Sails’ event.

A free exhibition on studio’s 11-year career to date is also being held at the Western Foyer of the Opera House.

Vivid Sydney is managed by Destination NSW, the NSW Government’s tourism and major events agency and features light installations, projections, music performances and multiple artistic collaborations. For more information visit vividsydney.com.

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Creative direction/concept: Universal Everything, Sheffield, UK

Creative Director: Matt Pyke

Animation Director: Chris Perry

Sound Designer: Simon Pyke / Freefarm - freefarm.co.uk

Producer: Greg Povey

Animation sequences:

01, Block: Universal Everything

02, Burst: Patch d. Keyes - UK

03, Fill: Drew Tyndell - US

04, Chase: Tymote - Japan

05, Multiply: Nicolas Ménard - Canada

06, Climb: Parallel Teeth - New Zealand

07, Rise: KClogg - Russia

08, Twist: Matt Scharenboich - US

09, Wind: Váscolo - Argentina

10, Swarm: Universal Everything

11, Calm: Zutto - Russia

12, Float: Cindy Suen - Hong Kong/US

13, Power: Masanobu Hiraoka - Japan

14, Slide: Ori Toor - Israel

15, Spin: Ori Toor

16, Wave: Váscolo

17, Construct: DXMIQ - Russia

18, Growth: DXMIQ

19, Flow: Ruff Mercy - UK

20, Scatter: Caleb Wood - US

21, Shrink: Bee Grandinetti - Brazil

22, Noise: Takcom  - Japan

23, Attack: MixCode - Taiwan

24, Boom: nöbl - nobl.tv - France

25, Bounce: Matt Abbiss - UK

26, Ricochet: Matt Frodsham - UK

27, Splash: Guille Comin - Spain

28, Bang: Universal Everything

29, Embrace: Matt Frodsham

30, Melt: Caleb Wood

31, Stripe: Matt Abbiss

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Photo London http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/photo-london-2015 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/photo-london-2015#feedback Thu, 21 May 2015 16:00:00 +0000 Antonia Wilson http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89886

In the largest ever takeover of Somerset House, the first annual Photo London opens this week, with commissioned shows and galleries and publishers from around the world exhibiting iconic images from the masters and fresh new work by emerging artists.

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In the largest ever takeover of Somerset House, the first annual Photo London opens this week, with commissioned shows and galleries and publishers from around the world exhibiting iconic images from the masters and fresh new work by emerging artists.

The aim was to steer away from traditional notions of ‘the art fair' – moving away from the standard grid-like formation with a more laissez-faire vibe – and the organisers have packed photography into every nook and cranny of the vast Somerset House, using rooms that have never open to the public before and showing work in corridors, across four levels of the building and the courtyard.

From Gardening at Night, by Cig Harvey (Robert Klein Gallery)

Men in the Cities (1979), by Robert Longo

"When making their selection, our curatorial committee asked three things of the exhibitors," explains Michael Benson, co-director of Photo London. "First and foremost, is the work you are seeing of the highest quality? Second, does the proposal feature work that has rarely is ever been seen before? And thirdly, is there work included by young and emerging photographers?"

And indeed there's some intriguing work in the Discovery section, created in response to the curator's call for work from emerging artists, Benson explained, and found in the lower part of the mezzanine level, which, he says, they hope to grow in the future.

There are some hidden gems to be found depending on taste, from experimental work and installations, to reworked vintage photography, but the event would certainly benefit from more of this, both in these galleries sections and potentially additional commissioned shows as well.

Tunnel (1999) by Naoya Hatakeyama

Nach Innen / In Deeper (1999) by Rut Blees

Three special exhibitions commissioned for Photo London, including Beneath the Surface (images above), which runs until 24 August in Embankment Galleries East, presenting a selection of rarely seen before photographs revealing the breath of the V&A's collection (of over half a million). The riverfront location of the building was used as a starting point for the show, with 200 images, some dating back to 1852, and contemporary and experimental work, many curated together around themes the theme of water.

Also in Embankment Galleries East, Sebastião Salgado's Genesis and Platinum (shown above) is being exhibited, with previously unseen mages from the breathtaking series of large-format prints. The Brazilian photographer captured the series during 32 journeys to distant corners of the globe over eight years, in a quest to find the untouched wonders of the world.

Prostitute (shown above), by Iranian documentary photographer Kaveh Golestan, is an intense series capturing Teran's former red light district, taken between 1975-77, on show in Embankment Galleries West until 24 May. The portraits were the final photographic record taken of the walled ghetto area where 1,500 women lived and worked, before it was set alight and demolished by official decree after the revolution in 1979.

i series (2014), by Eamonn Doyle (Michael Hoppen Gallery)

Running alongside the exhibtions is a programme of talks with an extensive list of the industry's leading photographers, curators and critics, including Nadav Kandar, Erik Kessels, Don McCullin, Sebastião Salgado, Mitch Epstein, Rankin, Stephen Shore and many more. Check out the full list of talks here.

Cooling Tower, Power Station, Scheibler Textil Factory, Poland, by Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre (Polka Galarie)

There are also events at Somerset House celebrating music photography, matching imagery to DJ sets, in collaborations with YoYo, Just Jam and Rinse FM with visuals from Beth Lesser and Bill Bernstein, every evening from 7pm-late in the Deadhouse space beneath the courtyard.

Vogue (1942), by Horst P Horst (Bernheimer)

"Our aim was always to establish this week at the end of May as London's 'Photography Week'," says Benson, who is hopeful that in future it will rival the likes of Paris Photo. "We thought this might talk a while. Not a chance."

Benson says that photography shows and events are springing up across the city in response to Photo London – at galleries including Tate with the Offprint book fair timed to coincide with the week; photography sales at major auction houses; commercial galleries with photo shows; plus pop-up exhibitions smaller spaces.

Much of this is in its infancy but it is certainly encouraging that Photo London has begun to catalyse a city-wide celebration of photography – and, hopefully, ‘London Photo Week' will grow in years to come.

There's so much to see but here are a few more of our favourites ...

Variant Crowd 2, St. Petersburg (1993) by Alexy Titarenko (Nailya Alexander Gallery)

Anonymous (vintage slides) (Galerie Lumiere des roses)

Red Shoes, from Still Here, by Lydia Goldblatt (Wapping Project Bankside)

The Cult of the Self 3, by Miles Aldridge (Kasher Potamkin)

Brooklyn Gang (1959), by Bruce Davidson (Howard Greenburg Gallery)

Kate Moss Study #4 (2011) by Steven Klein; Philip Seymour Hoffman (2003), by Martin Schoeller (Camera Work)

Stars 8, by Ellie Davies (Crane Kalman Brighton)

Tokyo Parrots, by Yoshinori Mizutani (Amana (amanasalto / IMA))

Cream (2015), and Mop (2014) by Kendrik Kerstens (Danziger)

Dalston Anatomy (2013), by Lorenzo Vitturi (Flowers Gallery)

Iceberg (2012) by Noemie Goudal (Edel Assanti)

Salt Man (2013), by Polixeni Papapetrou (Galerie Pavlova)

Self portrait (2009), by Jun Ahn (Christophe Guye)

Rise Up You Are Free (2014), by Dominic Hawgood (RCA)

Photo London runs 21 - 24 May. Day tickets £20, conc. £17, children £14, family £52. For the full programme and more info visit photolondon.org

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Carter Wong puts Howies wardrobes up for auction http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/howies-wardrobes http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/howies-wardrobes#feedback Thu, 21 May 2015 14:33:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89904

In 2003, Carter Wong teamed up with 13 artists and illustrators to customise a range of abandoned wardrobes for clothing label Howies. The agency is now selling four of those wardrobes on eBay to raise money for homeless charity Café Art...]]>

In 2003, Carter Wong teamed up with 13 artists and illustrators to customise a range of abandoned wardrobes for clothing label Howies. The agency is now selling four of those wardrobes on eBay to raise money for homeless charity Café Art...

The project was Carter Wong's first collaboration with Howies, the ethical clothing label founded by Dave and Clare Hieatt in 1995. After sourcing recyclable tulip bulb bags to use as packaging for its cotton t-shirts, the agency was asked to devise some in-store displays. Carter Wong co-founder Phil Carter had the idea for transforming wardrobes after he spotted skateboarders using one as a ramp in Hammersmith.

As he explained in an interview with CR for our craft issue last November: "At the time, Howies' core business was t-shirts aimed at the skateboarding and cycling community, so it fitted the concept perfectly." Wardrobes were sourced from charity shops around the capital, and artists including Marion Deuchars, Jeff Fisher, Paul Blow and Brian Cairns were asked to create a design based on a Howies' philosohopy (the brand often used political and environmental slogans on its products).

Roderick Mills' wardrobe for howies. Bid on eBay for it here

The designs reference topics from junk mail and waste to fish farms, and were exhibited at a pop-up event in West London before appearing in-store and in windows at Selfridges. Four have since been returned to Carter Wong's office, but the agency is keen to give the furniture to a good home, and is now selling each one on eBay. Wardrobes up for sale are by Roderick Mills, Paul Davis, Ian Wright and Aldous Eveleigh, and prices start at £50.

Paul Davis' wardrobe for howies. Bid on eBay for it here

Ian Wright's wardrobe for howies. Bid on eBay for it here

Aldous Eveleigh's wardrobe for howies. Bid on eBay for it here

Bidding closes on May 29 and all proceeds will be donated to Café Art, a London-based charity that helps homeless people earn a living through creative enterprises. "Bearing in mind the way in which the wardrobes were found - displaced and discarded - a partnership of this kind seemed fitting," explains the agency. "Each of the four winning bidders will receive a one-of-a-kind, individually illustrated wardrobe that is in itself a piece of art, with a deeper story to tell."

More info on Carter Wong's website.

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CR June: The Age issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/cr-june-the-age-issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/cr-june-the-age-issue#feedback Thu, 21 May 2015 12:37:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89896

Our June issue looks at how the creative industries are engaging with our ageing population – and how working both for and with older people can create a better world for everyone...

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Our June issue looks at how the creative industries are engaging with our ageing population – and how working both for and with older people can create a better world for everyone...

While the narrative around our ageing population remains, sadly, rather negative, it's a version being countered by numerous individuals and organisations who see older people as experienced, knowledgeable and valuable members of society.

We look at the work being done to challenge the stigma of ageing by the established Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design and the recently-formed Age of No Retirement? events – and hear from two inspirational figures from very different walks of life: architect Frank Gehry and sign-painter Graham Brown, who both stress the importance of working on what you love.

From practical design advice to emotive image-making, we also look at how designers are increasing the range of products and tech available for older people and meet three photographers who have made moving, personal projects about their parents and grandparents.

The language we use to describe older people is key to all of this – not to mention the visual imagery we use to represent them in everything from advertising to magazines. Our front cover, above, features 'Valerie', photographed by Natalia Lipchanskaya. Full details on the issue are below.

The best way to ensure you never miss an issue of CR is to subscribe and save up to 30% off the cover price. All our subscribers can also take advantage of our CR Club offers, which are listed here. Full details on how to subscribe are here.

Opening our Age section, Mark Sinclair reports back from the second Age of No Retirement? event in Manchester and finds that an awareness of the language we use to talk about older people is at the heart of the movement to change how we think about ageing. (TAONR also needs your help to realise many of the ideas proposed at their recent conference.)

 

Graphic language is explored in a challenge from design studio NB and the Spring Chicken website: can the message of the 'warning, elderly people' road sign be better designed? We show 19 examples from the resulting Sign of the Times project.

 

After 16 years leading the Royal College of Art's Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design, ex CR-editor Jeremy Myerson is to step down from his role this Summer. For our Age issue, he looks back at the progress made in tackling design problems for older people – and highlights some of the Centre's most innovative work to date.

 

Eliza Williams investigates the recent trend for featuring older women in advertising – as the face of L'Oréal, Marc Jacobs and Céline, for example – but questions whether the move is really indicative of a shift away from the industry's obsession with youth. She talks to Justine Picardie, editor-in-chief of Harper's Bazaar; Danielle Pender of Riposte magazine; and Rosie Arnold, deputy ECD at BBH London.

In an exclusive extract from Getting There, Gillian Zoe Segal's new book on mentors, architect Frank Gehry (86), traces the key moments of his career and offers up advice on taking risks and doing what you love...

 

... while Rupert Howe meets the Gloucestershire-based narrowboat painter, Graham Brown, still working hard in his mid-70s. Brown's craft is celebrated in a new short film for the Canal & River Trust, while his designs have found their way onto an exclusive range of hand-painted menswear and accessories, courtesy of local label, Tender.

 

With the number of people living with dementia presenting one of the biggest health challenges facing the world today, Rachael Steven looks at how designers and ad creatives are helping to improve the quality of life for people with the condition.

And Rachael also talks to Anna James, the founder of the Spring Chicken website which sells products aimed at making life "easier and brighter" as people get older – from 'sports' canes (shown in the spread above) to simple, well-designed MP3 players and tablets. Ollie Campbell of Melbourne's Navy Design also offers some sound advice on designing tech for older people.

 

Closing our Age section, Antonia Wilson meets three photographers who have each documented the last years of their parents' or grandparents' lives, a challenge that in each case has resulted in a series of moving and highly personal images.

 

In the rest of the issue, our Month in Review section includes a look at the 'tableau vivant' created for Anzac Day in New Zealand and details how the New York Times Magazine's Walking Issue came together; while Daniel Benneworth-Gray worries about being left behind in the face of constantly updating technology and Michael Evamy examines Pentagram's identity for Hillary Clinton's US presidential campaign (both above).

 

In Crit, Pentagram's Naresh Ramchandani reveals how an encounter with poet Henry Ponder's in-the-moment verse led the designer to delve deeper into the current trend for 'mindfulness'...

 

... while InkyGoodness's Lisa Hassell reports from the 11th installment of Berlin-based illustration and character-design festival, Pictoplasma, which has shaken up its format this year. In his Art Directing the Idea column, Paul Belford hones in on a stunning Vogue cover from 1949.

The best way to ensure you never miss an issue of CR is to subscribe and save up to 30% off the cover price. All our subscribers can also take advantage of our CR Club offers, which are listed here. Full details on how to subscribe are here.

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New illustration: Eleanor Taylor, Karrie Fransman, Jessica May Underwood, Daniel Frost & more http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/new-illustration-2105 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/new-illustration-2105#feedback Thu, 21 May 2015 12:20:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89867

Our latest pick of new illustration includes the winning work from this year's Prize for Illustration, awarded by the AOI and London Transport Museum, a vibrant installation for Southbank Centre's Alchemy festival, floral displays at Harrods and a charming book of untranslatable words from around the world.

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Our latest pick of new illustration includes the winning work from this year's Prize for Illustration, awarded by the AOI and London Transport Museum, a vibrant installation for Southbank Centre's Alchemy festival, floral displays at Harrods and a charming book of untranslatable words from around the world.

London Transport Museum: London Places and Spaces

The Association of Illustrators and London Transport Museum's annual Prize for Illustration invites artists to submit a piece of work which reflects life in the capital. This year's theme was places and spaces, with a brief to portray "London's distinct personality and characteristics."

CR's Mark Sinclair was on this year's judging panel, which selected three winners were selected from over 1000 entries. Gold was awarded to Eleanor Taylor for her image depicting the Royal Observatory in Greenwich (shown top), silver to Carly Allen Fletcher for her richly coloured Compound City print, and bronze to Eliza Southwood for Parkour at the South Bank. Taylor will receive £2000 and see her image displayed on the London Underground, while Fletcher and Southwood receive £1000 and £750.

Silver prize winner Carly Allen-Fletcher's Compound City (left) and bronze winner Eliza Southwood's Parkour at the South Bank

Prints on display at LTM

Commenting on Taylor's print, judges praised its composition and clever response to the brief (presenting a 'place' to look at 'space'). Fletcher's was selected for its dynamic representation of London landmarks and intriguing use of shapes, and Southwood for its urban realism and brilliantly rendered buildings.

One hundred shortlisted entries are also on display in an exhibition at London Transport Museum, Covent Garden Piazza, WC2E 7BB until September 6. See ltmuseum.co.uk for opening hours and visiting info.

 

V&A Illustration Awards 2015

The winner of the V&A Illustration Awards were also announced this week, with Sterling Hundley winning the overall prize and best book illustration for his artwork in the Folio Society's edition of Treasure Island, pictured above. Described by judges as "richly coloured, atmospheric and stylistically consistent," his work was praised for its ability to capture the violent and menacing undertones of Robert Louis Stevenson's text.

Yehrin Tong won the book design award for her outstanding work on Michel Faber novel, The Book of Strange New Things (you can read our article on the making of the cover here):

 

Simon Pemberton received the editorial illustration award for an oil sketch accompanying an article by crime writer Ann Cleves about research trips to the Shetland Isles, which judges praised for its “great painterly technique and wonderful colour”, and which perfectly captures the isolation of the northern isles:

And RCA's Daphne Christoforou won the student illustration award for No Island, a wall hanging inspired by Tibetan imagery, Indian Chintz textiles and science documentaries. The print "echoes a narrative of perfection as understood in Buddhist philosophy" explains Christoforou on her website. "A focused and uncluttered mind is represented here by the Elephant and the Mahout (Elephant Rider). Surrounding the protagonists are the mental states that obscure and congest the mind’s clarity (attachment, boredom, fear and pain). The story concludes in both psychological and material attachments vanishing into a black hole," she says. There's plenty more great work on Christoforou's site, too, including illustrations for The Telegraph and Management Today, and another prize-winning one based on Roland Barthes' essay, Leaving the Movie Theatre.

 

It's an inspiring collection of work, and you can see all of this year's shortlisted entries on display at the V&A's National Art Library until August 2, or view the gallery online.

 

Jessica May Underwood - Harrods Pop-Up Flowers

Fashion and editorial illustrator Jessica May Underwood (represented by Breed) has collaborated with Harrods on an elegant series of botanical installations to coincide with this year's Chelsea Flower Show. 3D window displays represent the floral notes in different luxury scents stocked at the store, and feature some beautifully crafted irises, peonies, lilies and roses.

Underwood regularly collaborates with Harrods - she drew the mouse which featured in its latest Christmas ad and window displays, as well as a detailed scaled-down drawing of the store for its official Christmas card - and produces illustrations for its customer magazine and in-store displays. Asked by director of creative marketing Deborah Bee to create "a floral world for the beginning of Spring", she spent four months working with art directors at each perfume brand, studying 35 flowers plus bees and insects to produce the final artwork.

"First references were drawn from William Morris, the work of Arthur Rackham and my archive portfolios of botanical drawings," explains Underwood.

"I worked on each element by hand, in pencil and then watercolor...When each illustration was complete, it would be formatted and sent to the artwork team at Harrods. The production house Millington Associates were then enlisted to fabricate each hand drawn element into large scale three dimensions against large scale books as ' Pop Up ' installations, some standing at over two meters tall," she adds.

"It was imperative throughout to maintain a strong bold line for large scale production, [and] also clarity for distinguishing each element," Underwood adds. "To see the finished pieces unveiled was extremely rewarding - the line quality of every piece has been maintained throughout the project," she says.

 

 

 

Daniel Frost - Haircuts of Hackney

Independent publisher Hoxton Mini Press has produced some great titles documenting East London life of late, from Ian McDonnell and Harry Ades' Field Guide to East London Wildlife to Chris Dorley Brown's Drivers in the 1980s.

Its latest release, Hackney Haircuts, is a visual encyclopedia of the many styles sported by residents in the borough, from quiffs and combovers to moptops, buns and even the pretzel. The fold out book contains 35 colourful paintings by illustrator Daniel Frost, who is based in the area, though hails from Staffordshire. It's priced at £12.95 or £20 for a special edition, and you can order copies at hoxtonminipress.com

 

Ella Frances Sanders - Lost in Translation

Lost in Translation is a charming compendium of 50 untranslatable words from around the world, written and illustrated by Ella Frances Sanders. Each word is accompanied by a description and original artwork, and the book features words in German, Yiddish, Swedish, Arabic, Japanese, Hindi, Icelandic, Inuit, Korean and even Wagiman.

Entries range from words describing emotions and sensations, from the Gaelic Sgriob ("the itchiness that settles on your upper lip before drinking a whisky") and the German Waldeinsamkeit (a feeling of being alone with nature), to measurements, actions and even adjectives for men who like to leave their shirt untucked. It's a fascinating look at the nuances of language and Sanders' illustrations help bring each obscure word to life.

The book is published by Vintage imprint Square Peg on June 4 and costs £10. Sanders has also set up a website, untranslatablebook.com, to promote it.

 

Hartlepool Festival of Illustration

Poster designed by Ralph Steadman

Hartlepool Festival of Illustration is a new event co-hosted by Cleveland College of Art and Design and Hartlepool Art Gallery. The programme includes a two-day symposium with talks from the AOI, Owen Davey, Chris Riddell and Sara Ogilvie; a marketplace where artists from around the country will be selling prints, books and posters, and a month-long exhibition featuring work by 30 illustrators and comic artists from Ralph Steadman to Will Simpson. There will also be free arts workshops for children and young people.

The festival is part of an initiative to increase participation in arts in the northeast – Cleveland has recently received funding to expand its campus and build new studio spaces, as well as adding a new gallery, café and shop its existing grounds, and says it will be working with the local council to host a year-round programme of creative events.

festivalofillustration.com

 

Karrie Fransman - Alchemy at Southbank Centre

Alchemy is an annual festival at London's Southbank Centre showcasing art, literature, theatre, music and dance from the UK and South Asia. Artist and graphic novelist Karrie Fransman was asked to create an installation for the event, and worked with comic artists Syed Rashad Imam Tanmoy and Asifur Rahman to craft a vast Bangladeshi street scene. The artwork features some lovely hand drawn patterns and lettering and is on display at Royal Festival Hall until May 25.

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Behind the scenes at Ikea HQ http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/ikea-hq http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/may1/ikea-hq#feedback Wed, 20 May 2015 10:00:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=89750

Last week, we took a trip to Ikea’s HQ in Älmhult, Sweden for the brand's Democratic Design Day: an annual event offering a behind-the-scenes look at its testing lab, design centre and forthcoming products, from collaborations with British fashion designers to toys designed by children...

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Last week, we took a trip to Ikea’s HQ in Älmhult, Sweden for the brand's Democratic Design Day: an annual event offering a behind-the-scenes look at its testing lab, design centre and forthcoming products, from collaborations with British fashion designers to toys designed by children...

Ikea's global design centre

 

Ikea now has 301 stores in over 30 countries, but its headquarters are still based in the tiny town where it was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943 (the brand is named after his initials, and the first letter of the nearby village and farm where he grew up). Around an hour on the train from Malmö and one and a half from Copenhagen, it is surrounded by fields and farmland and home to just a few thousand residents. Most work for Ikea, or are related to someone who does.

Arriving at Älmhult station, there is little sign of the brand’s presence, just a few small apartment blocks, some old wooden houses, a handful of shops and a pizzeria. A few minutes walk, away, however, is Ikea’s head office, its global design centre and its product testing lab. There’s a notable absence of blue and yellow (and Ikea's instantly recognisable logo), but there is an Ikea hotel and next door, a small museum presenting a look at branding and furniture from the 1950s to the present day.

We were invited to Ikea HQ for the brand’s second Democratic Design Day – a mini conference including talks from design manager Marcus Engman, CEO Peter Agnefjäll and chief sustainability officer Steve Howard, who discussed forthcoming collections and Ikea’s focus for the future. But first, we were taken to the lab, where everything from mattresses to light bulbs are put through a fascinating series of experiments to ensure they meet international safety standards and Ikea’s own quality guidelines.

Ikea Test Lab

 

In one room, mechanical wooden buttocks are used to test sofas and chairs, while a giant wooden roller measures the lifespan of mattresses. A robotic arm is used to open and close cupboard doors, a wooden sphere simulates a baby bouncing up and down in a cot, and there's a room filled with bulbs hooked up to computers to measure their brightness and lifespan.

There are also climate chambers for testing products’ durability in extreme temperatures and humidity, and labs to test the chemicals present in furniture, the maximum height of candle flames and fabric resistance to sweat, saliva and stains. Ikea’s products aren’t usually seen as investment pieces, but the lab is a fascinating insight into how seriously the brand takes quality control, developing its own equipment and machinery to ensure items exceed safety standards and can withstand daily wear and tear (provided they’re properly assembled).

In the same building as the Ikea hotel, which is kitted out in Ikea furnishings and a dining room serving Ikea food, an Ikea Through the Ages exhibition presents a small but fascinating collection of memorabilia, from the brand’s first flat pack product (a three legged table which was recently put back into production) and early logos to every catalogue ever published, plus a series of displays showcasing living room furniture from the 50s to the 00s.

1950s Ikea logos


Ikea’s flat pack distribution model, its out of town stores and cafes are often the subject of ridicule – for many a Brit, a trip there conjures images of missing screws, lopsided furniture and hours spent sat in traffic – but the museum is a reminder that the brand’s approach to retail and distribution was pioneering. The museum is currently spread out over just one floor, but in 2016, will move into a huge site to house Ikea's extensive archives, offering a more comprehensive look at the evolution of Ikea's branding and homeware.

 

1980s and 90s catalogues

 

While the test lab and museum are fairly low key, Ikea’s design centre is a shiny new space complete with a room full of 3D printers for making prototypes, a vast workshop for testing materials and minimal meeting rooms stocked with Ikea furniture and whiteboards covered in Post-Its. It’s here that the Democratic Design Day takes place, and where journalists are invited to preview forthcoming collections.

1970s in-store advertisements

 

Products are displayed alongside sketches and photos showing their development, and include a range of soft toys designed by children (which reminded us of Kingston graduates Joshua Lake and Jack Beveridge’s brilliant chair based on children’s sketches); minimal cork furniture by designer Ilse Crawford, illustrated textiles and storage boxes from fashion designer Walter Van Beirendonck, and a striking collection from menswear designer Katy Eary.

Founder Ingvar Kamprad's desk

 

Eary is known for her strange and surreal prints, and the Ikea collection is no exception – aimed at men, it includes mugs and plates with photographic fish prints, cardboard animal heads and textiles covered in a repeating eyeball pattern, inspired by Terry Gilliam film Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

 

Katy Eary's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas inspired designs

 

The Design Day is part of a new initiative from the brand to be seen as more transparent, but it’s also part of its efforts to reinvent itself as a leading name in furniture design. Ikea’s USP has long been its cheap prices and practical storage solutions, such as floating shelves and the Expedit bookcase, but with many consumers now opting for handmade, vintage and upcycled products, mass produced flat pack homeware has lost some of its appeal.

Engman has spoken before about his desire to bring some surprise back to Ikea’s products, and in a talk at the Democratic Design Day, highlighted several ways it plans to do so: from furniture which interacts with technology, including lights and bedside tables which can wirelessly charge phones and laptops, to ranges which offer ‘mass produced uniqueness’ (the retailer has recently been working with a university on creating a customisable system of parts which can be used to build hundreds of different wooden storage systems).

Collection designed by graphic artist Walter Van Beirendonck

 

He’s also keen to work with fashion designers, no doubt for the cultural cache that comes with doing so, but also, he said, because “fashion is fast and reactive”, something he feels Ikea should be too. The brand plans to launch more capsule collections and limited edition products in future, he said, and more ranges made in partnership with social enterprises and craftspeople from around the world.

Illustrated textiles, part of a new environmentally friendly range, Anvandbar

 

Other talks focused on forthcoming ranges to encourage creative play among children (including new books, games and apps), a collaboration with Unicef to build flat pack shelters for refugees which can be assembled in just a few hours and last up to three years (a batch of which has just been shipped to people who have been displaced in Nepal following the recent earthquakes there), and the results of Ikea’s annual Life At Home report. Published online, the report assessed eating habits in eight cities around the world, and will be used to create new dining products and kitchenware.

Ikea's flat pack shelter for refugees and displaced communities


Attending the Design Day, it's clear that Ikea is investing significant resources in boosting its design credentials: its biggest draw may still be its cheap furniture, but its new collections offer an interesting look at how a long-established retailer can attempt to compete with younger, newer and smaller labels - and restore its reputation as an innovative brand, as well as a low cost one.

Ikea's new range of soft toys, based on drawings made by children. £1 from each will be donated to children's charities

A new range of textiles and products based on patterns and textures found in India. The collection was designed by Swedish textile designer Martin Bergstrom, who worked with students at the National Institute of Fashion Technology in New Delhi

Items from Lattjo, a new range of toys for children

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