CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Fri, 31 Oct 2014 15:09:33 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 Ads of the Week http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/ads-of-the-week1 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/ads-of-the-week1#feedback Fri, 31 Oct 2014 15:09:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82870

This week we were impressed by ads for BBC Drama, HSBC and Sixt, plus a sweet online tool from the Barbican. First up though, are a set of US holiday ads (yep, it's started) for the Gap, shot by Sofia Coppola...

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This week we were impressed by ads for BBC Drama, HSBC and Sixt, plus a sweet online tool from the Barbican. First up though, are a set of US holiday ads (yep, it's started) for the Gap, shot by Sofia Coppola...

The ads fall under the Gap's new tagline, Dress Normal, which was launched in the summer by a series of slightly mysterious spots shot by David Fincher. These new ads by Coppola have a stronger core idea, playing on the notion that while you might 'dress normal', most people, especially your family at Christmas, are far from regular. There are four ads in the series, and the most successful ones feature the oddest characters - our favourites are the two shown above. Agency: Wieden + Kennedy New York; ECDs: Susan Hoffman, David Kolbusz; Creative directors: Stuart Jennings, Susan Hoffman; Copywriters: Laddie Peterson, Al Merry; Art directors: Jaclyn Crowley, Jeff Dryer; Director: Sofia Coppola; Production company: The Directors Bureau.

The BBC has been engaging in some blockbuster self-promotion of late. First we had BBC Music's epic new version of The Beach Boys' God Only Knows, and now BBC Drama is having a turn, with a celebration of its work helmed by Benedict Cumberbatch. The film opens with Cumberbatch intoning the 'seven ages of man' monologue from As You Like It. As the actor lists each age, appropriate footage from BBC dramas appears on screen: Call The Midwife for infancy etc. The film works especially well because of its mix of new and vintage BBC series, with scenes from The Singing Detective and of Colin Firth in Pride & Prejudice appearing alongside the inevitable Doctor Who and crime drama footage.

Saatchi & Saatchi has created this new spot to promote HSBC's international golf sponsorship which does a surprisingly good job of making the sport look edgy and fun. ECD: Kate Stanners; Creatives: Gemma Philips, Mark Slack; Director: Scott Lyon; Production company: Outsider.

It's hard to make car rental companies seem cheerful, let alone nice, yet these quirky new spots from BETC Paris for Sixt make a good fist of it. Creative director: Olivier Apers; Creatives: Jordan Lemarchand, Julien Deschamps; Director: Jack Cole; Production company: Rita Production.

Our final pick this week is a lovely piece of self-promotion from the Barbican in London, which comes in the form of an online tool which helps you find events and exhibitions at the arts centre to suit your mood. The 'Sentiment Search Tool' has been created by The Project Factory and orders the Barbican's vast programme into categories based on emotions, so whether you are feeling 'dazzling' or 'nightmarish', there will be something for you to visit. Play with the tool online at feelings.barbican.org.uk.

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Kemistry Gallery Needs You http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/kemistry-gallery-kickstarter http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/kemistry-gallery-kickstarter#feedback Fri, 31 Oct 2014 12:22:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82871

Faced with imminent closure, London's Kemistry Gallery is hoping to reinvent itself as the first centre in the UK dedicated solely to graphic art and design. Next February it aims to stage a pop-up show which will work as a pilot for the next phase of its development – but it needs your help...

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Faced with imminent closure, London's Kemistry Gallery is hoping to reinvent itself as the first centre in the UK dedicated solely to graphic art and design. Next February, it aims to stage a pop-up show which will work as a pilot for the next phase of its development – but it needs your help...

To date, Kemistry has been an exciting space for showing the work of graphic designers and illustrators. From Jean Jullien and Geoff McFetridge to Saul Bass, Milton Glaser and Lou Dorfsman, it has shown an impressive commitment to celebrating both established names and cutting edge talent. I've lost count of the number of shows that CR has been to and featured on the CR blog.

But the gallery has recently revealed some sad news, that its home on Charlotte Road in Shoreditch is set to be redeveloped and so Kemistry is likely to be closed within three months.

Founded by Graham McCallum and Ricky Churchill almost ten years ago, Kemistry are adamant that while expensive rents might be moving the premises on, they are far from giving up. Their aim over the next year is to raise enough money – partly through a Kickstarter campaign – to establish Kemistry as "the UK’s first centre dedicated solely to graphic art and design".

"Rather than mourn the loss of our current digs and admit defeat," they say, "we have decided to take the challenge on, not only to find a new home but think about reinventing Kemistry Gallery and taking it to a bigger, bolder and more ambitious place."

According to the gallery's Kickstarter page, Arts Council England has already committed to support them in their efforts to pilot a new version of the gallery, to coincide with our 10th anniversary. This special exhibition, entitled Kemistry Gallery: 10 years 60 works, will be hosted in an East London location, running from the beginning of February and will present highlights from a decade of celebrating the very best of classic and contemporary visual communication, including work by Saul Bass, Milton Glaser, Parra, Jean Jullien, Anthony Burrill and many more.

A mock-up of how Kemistry's pop-up exhibition might look

Kemistry has raised an initial £15,000 from the Arts Council and now need to match that to cover the exhibition costs over the next 30 days, via Kickstarter. As McCallum says in the video on the Kickstarter page, Kemistry's success has proved that there is an appetite for a place that shows graphic art and design – so they are determined to move on and to try and do something "bigger and better".

What McCallum outlines includes a larger gallery, additional spaces for talks and lectures, even screenings, potentially a bookshop or a cafe – more of a "resource" for graphic design than an exhibition space. If that happens, this cloud may well have one hell of a silver lining.

For full details of Kemistry's plans and how you can donate, visit the Kickstarter page here.

#SaveKemistryGallery design by Jean Jullien

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Reely and Truly: a new film on photography by Tyrone Lebon http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/reely-and-truly-a-new-film-on-photography-by-tyrone-lebon http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/reely-and-truly-a-new-film-on-photography-by-tyrone-lebon#feedback Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:30:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82740

Filmmaker and photographer Tyrone Lebon has created a new documentary that offers a loose portrait of over 20 photographers at work, and muses on the nature of photography today...

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Filmmaker and photographer Tyrone Lebon has created a new documentary that offers a loose portrait of over 20 photographers at work, and muses on the nature of photography today...

The film, which is shown below, features some of the most significant figures in contemporary photography, from Juergen Teller to Mario Sorrenti, Nobuyoshi Araki to Ari Marcopoulos. Yet it is as much an account of a personal journey for Lebon: shot in a cinema vérité style, it chronicles his thoughts and experiences in making the piece (including phone calls to his father, Mark Lebon, another acclaimed photographer), and also features many different shooting styles and techniques. This encourages the audience to think about the nature of image-making while also absorbing the stories revealed by the participants. The film is shown below:

Lebon has enjoyed significant success in recent years, in his commercial shoots for brands such as Gap, Nokia and Stüssy, and in his personal projects, which include a book of work for Baron magazine, exploring how digital technology has impacted on sexuality. Yet for this project, he took a pause to reflect.

"I've always been fascinated by photography and photographers since my teens," he tells CR. "I wrote my dissertation for my anthropology MA on a photographer, my dad's a photographer, but I thought I would make documentaries and didn't want to be a photographer. Anyway, as it worked out, photography became my career and then as I got busier over recent years, I felt like I needed to take some time away. Taking time to reflect on where I was at by being able to observe and talk to photographers I admire and am interested in felt like an exciting thing to do. So in December last year, I decided to take six months off shooting photos myself to do a project on photographers."

Choosing who to include in the film happened in a number of ways. "It was a mix between some of my favourite photographers whose work I admire, and then some were recommended and introduced to me by others, and some are friends I’ve known for years," Lebon continues. "Photographers are often pretty tricky people and busy photographers have a lot of demands on their time. So getting hold of them to even properly explain what you would like to do is hard enough.

"Juergen took me two years to properly get hold of," he continues. "He had been filmed for another documentary a year or two before and wasn’t keen to allow that again. But I was persistent and eventually he agreed. Araki, even though he was in an exhibition with Juergen, was hard to track down and it was actually thanks to a friend inviting me to his karaoke bar in Tokyo that I eventually managed to meet him. Takeshi Homma is one of my favourite parts of the film and he is an amazing person to meet and talk to, but the few hours I got to spend with him were only confirmed just before. Similarly there were other great photographers I would have loved to have included in this, and came very close to meeting but things just didn’t quite work out for one reason or another. But I am pretty persistent and will continue to track them down!"

The film's loose style was in part due to Lebon's decision to make the work alone, which presented a number of difficulties. "Travelling and working as a one man band was pretty hard while doing certain sections of the filming when I was moving quickly to different countries," he says. "Jetlag, constantly organising the next bits of filming, film jams, trying to get good sound, and all this while try to be focused and interview someone at the same time was pretty exhausting. But I needed to be alone as I wanted the film to feel intimate and even if I could’ve had a big crew it wouldn’t have helped to get the footage I was after."

Some of the appearances by photographers in the film are pretty fleeting, so it makes sense to discover that this version of the project is not the completed work. "This film should actually be seen as an extended trailer for a bigger book project," explains Lebon. "The book will include photographs, texts and films about 30 or so photographers – each film will be a short, 15 minute-ish portrait of each photographer, and I hope to have it finished by this time next year."

Despite the film being one of the more comprehensive explorations of the work of contemporary photographers, Lebon doesn't see it revealing any grand truths about the medium. "I don't think it reveals anything specifically about photography today," he says. "I hope it gives an insight into the ways these different photographers think and approach their work and their lives. But the thing it probably reveals most clearly is the journey I went on while trying to make this film about photography. As my dad says in the introduction, a film about photography should be seen as a lie about a lie, or maybe a truth about a truth..."

The film is released today via Canvas, a new platform sponsored by Grolsch that is "committed to promoting original cultural thinking and creativity". It is created in collaboration with Somesuch production company and DoBeDo.

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Music Videos of the Month http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/music-videos-of-the-month http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/music-videos-of-the-month#feedback Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:40:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82840

It's been a great month for music videos, with this round up featuring promos for Roy Kafri, Kasabian, Panda Bear, Bambooman, Murlo, Keaton Henson, and OK Go. First up though, a slice of animated brilliance for Sebastien Tellier...

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It's been a great month for music videos, with this round up featuring promos for Roy Kafri, Kasabian, Panda Bear, Bambooman, Murlo, Keaton Henson, and OK Go. First up though, a slice of animated brilliance for Sebastien Tellier...

Tellier is known for his distinctive Gallic style, which comes through even in cartoon form in this video for new track Love. The promo stars a nudey Tellier wandering through a Garden of Eden, and is directed by artist Valentine Reinhardt, who also painted the cover for his new album, L'Aventura. Production company: Division.

This new video for Mayokero by Roy Kafri is by Vania Heymann, the director behind last year's excellent interactive Bob Dylan video. Heymann makes great use of old record covers for this new piece – not a new idea in itself perhaps, but brilliantly executed here.

Director Ninian Doff created this dystopian tale for Kasabian's new track Stevie. Production company: Pulse Films.

Panda Bear's video for Mr Noah by directing collective AB/CD/CD is strangely gripping, even though it's hard to know quite what's going on and the swirling camera might make you feel a bit sick. Production company: Partizan.

A couple of more abstract pieces for you now: firstly, the video for Bambooman's Clasp, which is directed by Mark Prendergast and features some lovely use of bouncy rubber balls.

This mysterious video mixes classical imagery (rendered in CGI form) with shiny, liquidy graphics. Impressively, it is created by the musician himself, Murlo, and is for his track Into The Mist.

Director João Nuno is behind this narrative video about a lonely traveller to Bolivia, created for Keaton Henson's new track Don't Swim. Production company: Delicatessen Films.

Finally, no videos round up this month would be complete without the inclusion of the mighty OK Go, and the promo for their new song I Won't Let You Down. The band are masters of creating viral videos, and this new piece is a brilliant addition to their oeuvre, having picked up over 7 million views on YouTube in three days. As you probably already know, it features the band on Segway-type vehicles, is shot by cameras mounted on drones, and is extraordinarily watchable. Director: Morihiro Harano.

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Honda goes interactive in new ad campaign http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/honda-goes-interactive-in-new-ad-campaign http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/honda-goes-interactive-in-new-ad-campaign#feedback Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:00:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82838

Humble dad by day, member of a criminal underworld by night? Then this new interactive ad for Honda from Wieden + Kennedy London and director Daniel Wolfe will be right up your street...

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Humble dad by day, member of a criminal underworld by night? Then this new interactive ad for Honda from Wieden + Kennedy London and director Daniel Wolfe will be right up your street...

The campaign aims to promote the new Civic Type R car, which is described in the press release as the "wild child alter-ego of the Civic hatchback". To emphasise the car's dark side, we are invited to interact with an online film, which allows you to switch between two characters – the cool but stable dad in the daytime, and the nighttime criminal.

The interactive element of the campaign is minimal – you simply press the 'R' key to switch between the two stories – but the effect is smooth and the film is beautifully shot by Wolfe. Plus the campaign features a more dynamic and adventurous style than we've seen from Honda of late.

Below is a trailer for the film. For the full experience, visit hondatheotherside.com.

Credits:
Agency: Wieden + Kennedy London
Creative directors: Scott Dungate, Graeme Douglas
Creatives: Scott Dungate, Graeme Douglas, Paul Knott, Tim Vance
ECDs: Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth
Production company: Somesuch
Director: Daniel Wolfe
Interactive production company: Stinkdigital
Editorial company: Trim
VFX company: The Mill

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Illustrating a Heart of Darkness http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/heart-of-darkness http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/heart-of-darkness#feedback Thu, 30 Oct 2014 10:20:00 +0000 Nate Evuarherhe http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82804

The Folio Society has published some beautiful illustrated editions of classic novels this year, from A Clockwork Orange to Day of the Jackyll. Here, Nate Evuarherhe, assistant librarian at the V&A Museum, speaks to illustrator Sean McSorley about his artwork for a new edition of Joseph Conrad's troubling novella, Heart of Darkness...

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The Folio Society has published some beautiful illustrated editions of classic novels this year, from A Clockwork Orange to Day of the Jackyll. Here, Nate Evuarherhe, assistant librarian at the V&A Museum, speaks to illustrator Sean McSorley about his artwork for a new edition of Joseph Conrad's troubling novella, Heart of Darkness...

The cover of the Folio Society’s new edition of Heart of Darkness features a striking visual pun that sets the tone for the decidedly menacing illustrations that sit within its covers.

A crumbling steamer anchored on a riverbank in the heart of the rainforest belches out rust-red wisps of smoke that rise and merge to form the deathly eye-sockets of a skull. Death, decay, and alienation: the main themes in Joseph Conrad's well known text are vividly captured in new designs and illustrations by London based illustrator, Sean McSorley.

 

 

 

A recent graduate of Camberwell College of Arts' illustration MA, McSorley won the Folio Society/House of Illustration competition in September this year. The prize was the chance to deliver his own book commission for the Folio Society, working with its experienced art director Sheri Gee and the publisher's literary editors.

With hand-crafted end papers, a slipcase and six full colour illustrations, McSorely has taken Conrad's semi-autobiographical account – the book tells the story of an ivory trader who travels down the Congo, and was inspired by Conrad's own trips to the region in the late 1800s – and distilled it through his own imagination. "Visually, I tried to bring out some of the themes and motifs that exist in the book,” he explains.

“There is this idea of decay: all the European characters in the book all seem to fall apart spiritually, physically and emotionally. They’re all in this state of decay, and I used the motif of decayed rust to create some consistency in the images and string them all together.”

 

 

McSorley’s colour palette of rusty reds, murky greens and corroded crumbling browns is achieved by his inspired use of monoprinting; a technique that he says provides a library of textures and gradients and “has the appeal of accidents happening”.

Marks on an acrylic sheet take on a variety of forms and textures when transferred to paper, leaving the creative process open to chance and discovery. Combined with ink drawings and Photoshop editing, McSorley’s final product is the outcome of a process that is at once instinctive, spontaneous and yet highly methodical.

His approach to interpreting the text is also an intuitive response to strong visual elements in the narrative. “When I was reading, an image popped into my head and I knew it would make a good picture," he says. He then worked with Gee, art director at the Folio Society, to decide on further scenes and the level of detail required.

 

 

“The editor and art director were very passionate about the book and paid a lot of attention to detail," says McSorely. "When you’re reading [it], it’s not necessary to have those details in your head, but when you’re illustrating the text, those details need to be there.”

Praised for their atmospheric and dream-like quality, McSorley’s illustrations occupy the numinous space between literal representation and interpretive evocation of the spirit and tone of Conrad’s haunting text.

 

Nate Evuarherhe is assistant librarian at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. His research focuses on 20th-century and contemporary book design and illustration, and he has previously written for Illustration Magazine and Matrix.

Heart of Darkness is published by the Folio Society and priced at £29.95. The binding is three quarter-bound in cloth with a Modigliani paper side, and the spine and slipcase are blocked in silver foil. Art direction by Sheri Gee. For details or to order a copy, see foliosociety.com. More of McSorley's work is at seanmcsorley.co.uk


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New illustration: Chad McCail, Ian McDonnell, Kristjana Williams & more http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/new-illustration http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/new-illustration#feedback Tue, 28 Oct 2014 11:05:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82737

The first in our fortnightly pick of new illustration work features a beautifully drawn field guide to East London wildlife, an illustrated guide to the life and work of Francis Bacon, rock-and-roll themed prints from Dorothy and a fascinating mural documenting the history of London's Becontree Estate.

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The first in our fortnightly pick of new illustration work features a beautifully drawn field guide to East London wildlife, an illustrated guide to the life and work of Francis Bacon, rock-and-roll themed prints from Dorothy and a fascinating mural documenting the history of London's Becontree Estate.

The mural (pictured top) was painted by Chad McCail and commissioned by public art group Create for This Used to be Fields, a collaborative project from the Barbican, Historypin and Create which aims to document the Becontree Estate's past through a digital archive and public artworks.

Built as part of the 'Homes for Heroes' scheme, an initiative to help house soldiers returning from World War One, Becontree was the largest housing development in the world when it was constructed in the 1920s. It now has over 27,000 houses and covers four square miles of former countryside in Barking and Dagenham.

Lanarkshire-based artist McCail was commissioned to create a mural based on conversations with Becontree residents and has produced a colourful artwork charting key residents and moments in the estate's history.

The mural begins with images of the first residents moving in, still dressed in their military uniforms. It goes on to depict World War Two bombings, visits from Mahatma Ghandi and the Hitler Youth (both invited by famous pacifist and local resident Muriel Lester), the construction of the Dagenham Ford car plant, which inspired the film Made in Dagenham, and the defeat of the British National Party in 2010 (the party had hoped to take control of the council and held election campaigns in the area, but famously lost all of its seats to Labour).

Stories which inspired the mural have also been uploaded to the archive and This Used to be Fields will be hosting regular events for residents, such as Drop-in Tuesdays and photo and history sharing sessions - see historypin.org for details.

 

A Field Guide to East London Wildlife

Another East London project, A Field Guide to East London Wildlife, reveals the many animals that roam the streets, fields and parks of the capital, from urban parakeets to foxes, imported snakes and feral cats.

Written by wildlife author Harry Ades and published by Hoxton Mini Press, the book features several beautiful drawings by Ian McDonnell, accompanied by trivia about London's animal population and bizarre nature-related folklore, from tales of Jimi Hendrix releasing parakeets on Carnaby Street to stories of squirrels digging up gardens to look for drugs.

It's a lovely collection of images and an intriguing insight into London's wildlife: the standard paperback costs £8.95 and a collector's edition with alternative cover is also available for £15.00.

 

This is

Publisher Laurence King's This is series aims to provide an accessible visual guide to the work of iconic artists through portable illustrated monographs which feature specially commissioned illustrations. The first three titles in the series (which we wrote about here) covered Dali, Pollock and Warhol, with illustrations by Andrew Rae and Peter Arkle.

The latest instalments chart the careers of Francis Bacon and Paul Gaugin - Bacon's monograph was illustrated by London-based Christina Christoforou and Gaugin's features artwork by Polish artist Slawa Harasymowicz.

Each has a very different look - Christoforou's artwork is rendered in shades of pink and lilac, while Harasymowicz's appears against deep reds and blues - and as with previous titles in the series, illustrators were chosen for their ability to complement and contrast featured artists' work.

Both books are priced at £9.95 and you can order copies here.

 

Wetlands DM campaign

Design consultancy Build recently designed a visual identity, website and interiors for The Stow Brothers: an estate agents run by two brothers in Walthamstow, East London.

The identity combines a black, white and yellow palette with stencil lettering (see images here), and feels considerably more contemporary than most estate agent branding. Build has also since worked on marketing campaigns for the business, and recently created a beautiful series of illustrations for a direct mailer promoting a campaign to turn ten Victorian reservoirs in Walthamstowe into a nature reserve.

The illustrations, which feature local birds and ducks, were used on postcards detailling the project and Build has since released them as A3 and A4 prints, priced at £15 and £20. £5 from each sale will be donated to the London Wildlife Trust, and you can buy them from Build's online shop.


New menus for The Savoy & The Connaught

Hotel menus aren't featured very often on the CR blog (the last we wrote about was APFEL's for One Lecister Street, which featured botanical and slightly psychedelic artwork by Sister Arrow) but in the past few weeks, two designs have caught our eye.

The first is London hotel The Connaught's new menu, which features a 3D collage by artist Kristjana Williams. The artwork was commissioned by The Partners after the agency was asked to update the hotel's branding and has been applied to 160 items, from umbrellas and keycards to menus and 'do not disturb' signs.

The intricate design is featured in our November issue (seen below) and combines found Victorian imagery and modern elements which reference the hotel building and its history, from an image of a yellow Saluki Hound, the heraldic symbol of the hotel's founder, to pictures of horse chestnut trees referencing those outside The Connaught's main entrance:

 

The Savoy hotel's Beaufort Bar has also launched a new cocktail menu - a pop-up design by paper artist Helen Friel and illustrator Joe Wilson. Wilson and Friel worked closely with head bartender Chris Moore to design the menu. Inspired by a pop-up brochure made for the hotel in 1938, it features 15 illustrations, each representing a cocktail created by Moore exclusively for The Beaufort. The hotel has also produced a short film on the making of the project, which you can watch below:

Images by Toby Summerskill via wilson-joe.tumblr.com

Dorothy's Rock'n'Roll Zoo

For its latest series of screenprints inspired by popular culture, Manchester studio and shop Dorothy worked with illustrator Tracy Worrall to create 77 animals inspired by rock'n'roll song titles. Animals range from Crazy Horses (Neil Young) to Beetlebum (Blur), Superfly (Curtis Mayfield) and The Love Cats (The Cure).

The collection includes a 50x70cm print:

 


And four box sets (packaged in a vinyl style slipcase) containing 3 12" prints of individual characters:


It's a fun idea and a lovely collection of illustrations from Worrall - you can see the full set of prints here.

Fredun Shapur - Kemistry Gallery

Posters on display at Kemistry Gallery, via Kemistry on Instagram

The latest exhibition at London gallery Kemistry showcases the work of Fredun Shapur, a graphic artist who designed toys for Naef in Switzerland, Galt in the UK and Creative Playthings in the US between the 1960s and 80s (he also created Creative Playthings' logo and visual identity).

An RCA graduate, Shapur was taught by Abram Games and Edward Bawden and set up his own office in 1959. The Kemistry show includes a brilliantly crafted selection of children's products - from sculptural animal toys to four-way puzzles - as well as illustrations, packaging and record sleeve designs.

Record sleeve design for Tropic Records and a 1964 puzzle by Shapur, on show at Kemistry (via Kemistry on Instagram)

The exhibition is open until November 15 (details here) and if you can't make it to the show, you can read more about Shapur's work in Playing with Design, a retrospective published by PiqPoq earlier this year and edited by his granddaughter Mira.

This exhibition will show his graphic work through book illustration, record covers and packaging, and will also provide a unique opportunity to get hands on with his beautifully crafted toys. There will be a monograph and puzzles available for purchase, as well as posters. - See more at: http://kemistrygallery.co.uk/fredun-shapur-2/#sthash.KenEblLh.dpuf

Advice to sink in slowly

Founded by John Stanbury in 2006, Advice to sink in slowly provides free illustrated posters to first year art students bearing wise advice and words of inspiration from established creatives. The aim, says Stanbury, is to provide advice in a creative format that "people will want to live with, and which can let advice sink in slowly and be there to help out later on."

The project has recently launched its first wall calendar, priced at £15, with all proceeds going towards producing and distributing new posters. It's a worthy cause, and features work by Supermundane, Lizzy Stewart, Eleni Kalorkoti and Gemma Correll - plus a great cover illustration by We Three Club.

Buy a copy at advicetosinkinslowly.net

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The crafty one: CR November issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/cr-november-craft-special http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/cr-november-craft-special#feedback Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:45:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82702

The November issue of CR is a craft special with features on several contemporary makers: from bicycle builders and bespoke shoemakers, right through to the latest creators of virtual reality...

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The November issue of CR is a craft special with features on several contemporary makers: from bicycle builders and bespoke shoemakers, right through to the latest creators of virtual reality...

This issue also features news of CR Club, our subscriber initiative which replaces Monograph. CR Club will offer subscribers exclusive access to events, free gifts and money off a variety of brands. Details of our first exclusive invite-only event, ‘Letterpress @ The RCA' – a talk by the world-renowned typographer, design and letterpress practitioner, Alan Kitching – are here.

Our November issue cover – the text of which is painted onto etched glass – is by Ashley Bishop of The Brilliant Sign Company (see below) and introduces the idea of 'Tradition and Technology'.

And the first stop in our investigation into modern craft is, appropriately enough, the Makers Cafe in London: the first coffee shop to also offer a 3D printing service. Illustration by David Doran.

We then look at how The Partners have worked with illustrator Kristjana S Williams to create an original 3D collage for the capital's Connaught hotel, elements of which are then used over 100 applications in the building, communicating its distinctive brand of heritage and modernity.

Introducing five original documentary films which will be soon be debuting on the CR website, we meet the makers who will be profiled in the series. And while they make everything from jeans and shoes, to cycles, signs and mobile phones, they each share a passion to create the very best in their field.

We talked to Hiut Denim Co:

The Brilliant Sign Company (whose Ashley Bishop created our signwritten cover, top):

Makers of handsewn shoes, Carréducker:

HTC, who design human- and precision-crafted mobile phones:

And Rusby Cycles:

Broadening out the notion of craft into the cutting edge of the digital world, Eliza Williams talks to some of the leading proponents of virtual reality, including Oculus Rift, Marshmallow Laser Feast and Unit9.

And finally in our craft section, what happens when great craft skills are mixed with great ideas? Studio Carter Wong know fully well as they've been working like this for thirty years: to celebrate their anniversary, they took us through ten of their favourite projects.

In other features we have a seven-page visual feast of graphic design from the forthcoming GraphicsRCA: Fifty Years show which opens at The Royal College of Art next month and celebrates the great work produced by the college's students over the past fifty years.

And talking of longevity, we also look at the career of Erik Spiekermann – alongside our timeline of his life and work, we republish a fantastic interview with the designer and typographer which appears in a new book dedicated to his craft: Hello, I Am Erik, out now from Gestalten.

In Crit, Rachael Steven attends the second Modern Magazine conference, while Rick Poynor enjoys the thrill of an exhibition dedicated entirely to the Gothic at the British Library.

And in reverse formation, the front section of this month's issue sees Daniel Benneworth-Gray attempting to navigate the York Book Fair without causing any lasting damage; while Michael Evamy looks at the various identity projects which have graced the World Trade Center, pre and post-9/11.

This issue also features news of CR Club, our subscriber initiative which replaces Monograph. CR Club will offer subscribers exclusive access to events, free gifts and money off a variety of brands. Details of our first exclusive invite-only event, ‘Letterpress @ The RCA' – a talk by the world-renowned typographer, design and letterpress practitioner, Alan Kitching – are here.

If you are not already a CR subscriber, you can find out about our various subscriber packages, here.

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Barry Island's typographic climbing wall http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/barry-island-climbing-wall http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/barry-island-climbing-wall#feedback Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:39:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82187

Artist Gordon Young has transformed a neglected stretch of seafront on Barry Island with a 40-foot long typographic traversing wall made out of thousands of recycled plastic shapes.

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Artist Gordon Young has transformed a neglected stretch of seafront on Barry Island with a 40-foot long typographic traversing wall made out of thousands of recycled plastic shapes.

The wall was commissioned as part of Barry Island’s Eastern Promenade regeneration project and features the name of the island in both English and Welsh. Letters are made up of around 4000 shapes and 1000 novelty climbing holds in the shape of letters, fossils, fruit and dinosaurs.

Words can be read from the beach and promenade, as well as from planes landing at Cardiff Airport, and climbs have been configured for all ages and abilities: children can scale individual letters, while advanced climbers can traverse the entire length.

The project is one of several large-scale public artworks by Young: in 2011, he collaborated with Why Not Associates on the Comedy Carpet, a 2200 square metre artwork featuring 1000 jokes in granite letters embedded in concrete, paying homage to comedians who performed at Blackpool Tower (read our feature on it here):

And in 2006, he worked with Why Not and climber Ian Vickers to create two 20-metre high climbing towers in Blackpool using concrete and locally sourced stone:

The Barry Island wall was created with designer Josh Young at Part-Two Creative, local climber Rob Larney and the Barry Island History Group, and its design is inspired by the area’s heritage: hidden in each letter is a word or phrase with local significance, from The Strollers, the name of a local dance band, to Tafelberg, an oil tanker which beached on Barry Island but was later repaired and used as a military ship during World War Two.

Young also held workshops with local school children to determine some of the shapes that could be used for climbing holds (some relate to the area, others have a seaside or sporting theme) and says the colourful design is in part inspired by a toy shop, the Toy Factory, that once stood on the site. “I wanted it to look almost as if the Toy Factory had exploded and its contents had blown away,” he adds.

While many of Young’s previous projects make use of natural materials such as wood and granite, the Barry Island installation is made out of sheets of recycled plastic, cut using the same machine he used for the Comedy Carpet. “I had been looking at ways to use recycled plastics for a while and it worked well for this - it’s affordable, colourful and resilient against salt water,” he explains. “It’s a material we have so much of, but often don’t really know what to do with, and I think it could be used a lot more,” he adds.

After deciding on a typographic design, Young worked with Josh and Larney to refine letters and plan a series of colour coded routes for both novices and advanced climbers. “[Josh and I] drew up some letters that fitted the bill, then they had to be doctored to make them suitable for climbing on,” Young says.

“It was an interesting project to work on as you had to balance climbing practicalities with aesthetics: letters had to be as chunky as possible, with a large surface area for young climbers, and the smallest possible gaps between shapes and letters. We also needed to place fittings in between letters for climbers traversing the whole wall, which are the same colour as the concrete,” he explains.

“The letters look quite strange at first, but they’re really specific to the task. It’s also very unusual to see these novelty fittings for children in a serious bouldering wall – it’s a challenging route for advanced climbers, and they can really push themselves on it, while kids and beginners can have a go without fear of hurting themselves [there's a rubberised floor to prevent injury],” he adds.

The wall opens to the public next week and should help draw crowds to a previously unloved stretch of one of Britain's most popular beaches. It's great to see the local community involved so closely in a public arts project, too - particularly one that makes clever use of recycled waste.

Climbers will have access to the site 24 hours a day and Young says he hopes it will be popular with people of all ages in the area. "It was a tight budget, but we're really pleased with the results - it's had a great response so far from the builders who helped install it and passers by on the beach, and I can't wait to see people on it," he adds.

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New manifesto from David Shrigley (in the form of a book) http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/weak-messages-create-bad-situations-david-shrigley http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/weak-messages-create-bad-situations-david-shrigley#feedback Mon, 27 Oct 2014 13:30:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82661

The arrival of a new book from David Shrigley is always a pleasant way to begin the week: titled Weak Messages Create Bad Situations, this latest tome from the artist is published by Canongate and features over 400 new drawings. As you might imagine, it is rather amusing...

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The arrival of a new book from David Shrigley is always a pleasant way to begin the week: titled Weak Messages Create Bad Situations, this latest tome from the artist is published by Canongate and features over 400 new drawings. As you might imagine, it is rather amusing...

Shrigley has found fame both within the art world and beyond for his witty yet surreal drawings, sculptures and installations. Humour is central to his art, making him an unusual proposition in galleries and museums, where chuckles are often hard to find. He has been hugely successful in these realms despite this, with a major retrospective at the Hayward Gallery in London in 2012 proving immensely popular. The release of this book precedes another significant retrospective in November, this time held at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne.

There are several books of Shrigley's work in existence, and print is the perfect format to view his drawings, which will initially make you laugh out loud, before you notice the dark profundity that lies behind the humour. The printed page was also apparently the first medium Shrigley chose for sharing his work, by creating booklets on a Xerox machine and selling them in the pubs around Glasgow, where he studied at Glasgow School of Art and still lives.

This new book comes in the form of a manfiesto, opening with the statement: "It is my duty to represent the world as I see it." Shrigley then divides the drawings into eight chapters, where he takes on topics as varied as politics, the arts, and insects. According to the press release, the book proposes to be an antidote to the views of the "feeble-minded" people running the country who "don't know what the hell is going on". In this Shrigley is in good company, arriving at a time when extremist views appear to be particularly in vogue. Unlike some others however, Shrigley's manifesto is full of hilarity, alongside observations about the world that are both astute and absurd. Here's a selection of pages from it:

Weak Messages Create Bad Situations is published by Canongate for £25 as a hardback, or £19.99 as an ebook. More info is here. Fans of Shrigley also have the arrival of his Fourth Plinth sculpture in 2016 to look forward to, when he will deliver a 10 metre-high thumbs up to Trafalgar Square in London.

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