CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Tue, 27 Jan 2015 17:38:47 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 CR February iPad edition: The Food issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/cr-ipad-february--the-food-issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/cr-ipad-february--the-food-issue#feedback Tue, 27 Jan 2015 17:45:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85591

Don't forget you can also get the February's CR, the food issue, for iPad, where you'll find all the print mag articles and exclusive additional content in Hi Res, our showcase gallery section, and CRTV, with video profiles of creative people, animations and other moving image work from around the world....

]]>

Don't forget you can also get the February's CR, the food issue, for iPad, where you'll find all the print mag articles and exclusive additional content in Hi Res, our showcase gallery section, and CRTV, with video profiles of creative people, animations and other moving image work from around the world....

 

Features this month includes interviews with the team behind Leon and the founder of Disappearing Dining Club, current trends in food styling and photography, Phaidon cookery books, the Haller farming app, Bilder & De Clercq grocery stores, and the winners of the Penawards for packaging.

Plus art director Gemma Fletcher reviews the Guy Bourdin photography show at Somerset House, and not forgetting regular columns from Michael Evamy, Daniel Benneworth-Gray and Paul Belford.

In Hi Res you'll find collaborative work from photographer Rankin and make-up artist Andrew Gallimore, illustrations from Ladybird by Design, posters from the Ministry of Food archive, Sarah DeRemer's hybrid animal/vegetable photographs, Rob and Nick Carter's new Chinese Whispers series, surrealist photography from new publication Black Forest, and new work from self-proclaimed professional doodler Hattie Stewart.

CRTV includes award-winning stop-motion animations from PES, The Art of Plating, profile of mead maker Vince Carlson, experimental music visualization from Frederic Bonpapa, John Edmark's spinning 3D zoetrope sculptures, graphic designer Joost Grootens on creative mapping, and new animation from Masanobou Hiroka.

 

To submit work for consideration for CRTV or Hi Res, please email antonia.wilson@centaur.co.uk

For further info on the CR iPad app or to subscribe, click here.

 

 

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85591
Brilliantly funny new ad from Canal+ http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/brilliantly-funny-new-ad-from-canal http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/brilliantly-funny-new-ad-from-canal#feedback Tue, 27 Jan 2015 16:50:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85590

First we had the Bear, now Canal+ gives us unicorns...

]]>

First we had the Bear, now Canal+ gives us unicorns...

Canal+ has returned today with another instant classic ad, created by BETC Paris, the agency behind its earlier spots including March of the Penguins, The Bear and The Closet. The new ad features the mix of hilarity and epic drama that we've come to expect from the brand, this time centering on the story of Noah, and his quest to make sure that all animals are present on the ark.

Making the ad led to some unexpected conversations in the agency, according to CCO and President, Stéphane Xiberras, who comments: "The most complicated part of making the film was the kind of epic discussions we had about what a pair of unicorn balls actually look like, because no one has ever seen them. We thought of putting stars there, or little furry things. We ended up opting for a bit of sobriety. Well, a sort of sobriety at least..."

Credits:

Agency: BETC Paris
ECD: Stéphane Xiberras
Creative director: Olivier Apers
Creatives: Aurélie Scalabre, Patrice Dumas
Director: Matthijs Van Heijningen
Production company: Soixante Quinze

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85590
New type: Formist, Hoefler & Co, Studio Feed & more http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/new-type http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/new-type#feedback Tue, 27 Jan 2015 09:30:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85427

Our latest pick of new type designs, projects and events includes a guide to combining typefaces from Thames & Hudson, punk inspired lettering from Montreal studio Feed and new releases from Fontsmith and Hoefler & Co. First up, though, is a new style blog with some striking headlines...

]]>

Our latest pick of new type designs, projects and events includes a guide to combining typefaces from Thames & Hudson, punk inspired lettering from Montreal studio Feed and new releases from Fontsmith and Hoefler & Co. First up, though, is a new style blog with some striking headlines...

Kod & Form/Christopher West - Space Matters

Style blog Space Matters is described as a digital moodboard "where creative minds share their ideas and processes" - edited by Lisa Corneliusson and Nike Felldin, it features a series of image galleries curated by designers, photographers and creatives working in fashion.

The site was designed by Swedish studio Kod & Form and Christopher West, and features a great use of Commercial Type's Druk family coupled with Times New Roman.

"Space Matters is the product of a long collaboration with the editors," explain West and Kod & Form's Edvard Scott. "There was no initial brief, other than an idea to create a new take on the daily fashion blog, as we have come to know it...[with moodboards], visitors can dig into the material: explore images, read shorter texts, watch video and listen to songs, just as if they where visiting the studios of the artists."

"We've also tried to bring "editorial design" to your browser," add the pair. "One of our main design influences was an old German magazine called Twen, published in the 70's. It is filled with iconic photography and even more iconic typography. When Commercial Type released their font family Druk in mid 2014, the same time we started the project, we knew instantly that it was a perfect match. In a time when online typography is developing in a very fast rate, our goal as designers was ... 'how far can we intertwine the expression of the material into the design?'"

 

Studio Feed - Post/Youth Grotesque

In September 2014, Montreal studio Feed designed a bespoke typeface, Youth Grotesque, for an exhibition showcasing work by seven Canadian artists inspired by punk aesthetics and ideology.

After designing an identity for the exhibition, the studio was asked to contribute a series of posters using the typeface, which it plans to release commercially later this year

"Youth Grotesque is my take on what a post-punk typeface could be," explains Feed co-founder Anouk Pennel. "The installation was a set of five posters that show each weight of the font, in the manner of a specimen sheet. It also served as a commentary on the art world by the choice of words used to display the typeface."

As well as launching a touring exhibition in New York and Berlin, Feed says there are plans to publish a book art directed by artist Daniel Canty, exploring the idea and meaning of post-punk and punk's influence on contemporary visual arts, as well as its links to the avant garde.

While the typeface is not yet complete, Pennel says the basic structure (letters and numbers) has so far been designed in 17 styles - more images are available at studiofeed.ca

 

Type Team: Perfect Typeface Combinations

As its name suggests, new book Type Team: Perfect Typeface Combinations aims to provide a guide to pairing different typefaces for creative projects.

Compiled by Tony Seddon and published by Thames & Hudson, it contains 149 examples of successful combinations, covering graphic scripts as well as serifs, sans serifs and hand drawn lettering. Combinations are grouped by mood, period or theme, from sci-fi and sporty to opulent, whimsical and postmodern.

While Seddon admits some pairings won't be to everyone's tastes - in his introduction, he notes that the art of combining typefaces "is ultimately as subjective as it is scientific" with no straight answer to what makes a great combination - it's a handy resource, with useful suggestions and practical advice throughout.

Alongside visual examples, Seddon presents a series of principles and tricks - tricks offer tips such as how to gauge typographic colour or how to use ‘loud' typefaces in a way that avoids being overpowering, while principles explain how technical features such as aperture and counter shapes and glyph widths might affect different combinations. The book is published on 16 March and costs £14.99 - for details or to order a copy, see thamesandhudson.com

 

Hoefler & Co - Obsidian

The latest release from Hoefler & Co, Obsidian is a beautifully crafted ornamental typeface inspired by 19th century engraved lettering.

The typeface was created using digital techniques which simulate light and shadow, resulting in 2D letterforms with a remarkably convincing 3D effect. Its design builds on Hoefler & Co's Surveyor type family, which took inspiration from engraved maps.

Hoefler & Co says the aim was to create a decorative design which pays homage to tradition, while being relevant to designers today (it's available in six styles including Roman, small caps and italic) - the result, it says, "is a type family that escapes the shackles of historical style, while honoring the best traditions of decorative typography from the industrial age."

 

Fontsmith - FS Millbank

FS Millbank is a new typeface and icon set from Fontsmith, designed for use in signage and wayfinding systems.

Created by Stuart de Rozario, it is the result of significant research into current signage typefaces and how pace, volume of traffic and technological changes affect the way we take in information from signs and wayfinding today: as he explains in a blog post on its making, "my research findings...told me that in this fast-paced tech world we demand much more of fonts and how letterforms and words react to differing environment conditions - such as poor lighting, varying viewing perspectives and trying to decipher information in crowded spaces whilst on the move."

"Considerations also had to be taken into account about how the type looks on-screen in various sizes for devices, apps, route finders and electronic displays as well as in print," he adds.

To ensure Millbank would appear clearly legible in various conditions, de Rozario tested it in sizes ranging from 6 to 900 pt and created on-screen blur tests to identity how characters might be distorted in illuminated displays. He also added a range of features to eliminate 'ambiguous characters', including an extra serif on lower case 'i's to avoid confusion when reading at a distance, accentuated tails to aid reading at sharp angles and negative versions for use on brightly coloured or darker backgrounds.

It's an impressive design, and de Rozario has developed an extensive icon set made up of 172 symbols to accompany FS Millbank. Icons range from popular information and transport symbols to no smoking signs and user interface options such as like and dislike buttons. To promote its release, Fontsmith has launched a microsite showing examples of it in use, and some of the typeface's impressive features.

 

Formist - Serous

Serous is a four weight interlocking display typeface from Formist (founded by Mark Gowing), designed to "embody the feeling of liquid".

Gowing says the typeface is based on a modular system with characters drawn on a geometric grid to ensure uniformity - each style features the same curve radius and stroke weight, with no right angles in sight. Mark Gowing studio has also used the typeface to produce a series of custom spreads for New Zealand magazine Threaded, using a verse from Bob Dylan's Subterranean Homesick Blues, pictured below.

More info and samples are available at formist.co

Image via Mark Gowing Studio

 

onlab - Blaise Cendrars: Au Couer des Arts

Images by Angélique Stehli, via onlab.ch

Swiss studio onlab has devised a typographic identity system for Au Couer des Arts, an exhibition at La Chaux-de-Fonds’ Museum of Fine Arts showcasing the work of Swiss-born French poet and novelist, Blaise Cendrars.

Open until March, the show is made up of 12 sections exploring different sections of Cedrars’ life and work, from drawings to lyrics, novels, collaborations with contemporary artists and his time serving in the French Foreign Legion during World War One.

The identity features a custom font, Regla, designed by Matthieu Huegi and inspired by stencil characters used by French painter and sculptor Fernand Léger, who designed several of Cedrars' books:

Alternative characters (above) and the exhibition's architecture take inspiration from expressionist shapes and characters found in Cedrars' work – such as La Prose du Transsibérien et de la Petite Jehanne de France, an experimental illustrated book created with artist Sonia Delaunay in 1913. The four-colour palette also references the book, which has been reproduced in large scale on the floor of the museum (see below).

For visitor details, see mbac.ch

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85427
How Fredrik Bond achieved an 'epic strut' for Moneysupermarket.com http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/how-fredrik-bond-achieved-an-epic-strut-for-moneysupermarket http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/how-fredrik-bond-achieved-an-epic-strut-for-moneysupermarket#feedback Mon, 26 Jan 2015 15:42:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85566

Mother's new ad for price comparison site Moneysupermarket.com has been causing many a chuckle this week. We talked to director Fredrik Bond about how it was made...

]]>

Mother's new ad for price comparison site Moneysupermarket.com has been causing many a chuckle this week. We talked to director Fredrik Bond about how it was made...

The spot, shown below, stars Dave, a man so excited about the money he has saved on his car insurance via the site that he embarks on a booty-shaking 'epic strut'.

We talked over email to Fredrik Bond, of production company Sonny London, about some of the secrets behind making the ad (though sadly he refused to give up the goods on our most crucial question, regarding butt padding):

CR: What was your inspiration for the spot?

FB: Beyonce's butt. Another big source of inspiration was the simplicity of the script as well as the creatives from Mother who are really amazing at moving their bottoms. I would say that the script is based on a true story – I wish I had filmed when the creatives showed me what they had in mind.

CR: Who's the main guy – how did you find him?

FB: We did casting til our faces and asses turned blue. Michael [Van Schoick] was a natural for this. He just about had to step his foot into the door at the casting studio and we all knew it was him. What was also so exciting about him was that he had never done any commercials before this – a pure commercial virgin – so he would just give us 1000% in rehearsals and on set.

CR: How did you get such a good strut from him? Was there a choreographer?

FB: Michael and our fantastic, tireless choreographer Julianne 'JuJu' Walters worked both of their asses off (literally) to find the right strut and vibe for the spot.

CR: Is his bum real, padding, or CGI?

FB: That's a big muddy movie magic secret!

CR: How much CGI was there in the spot in general?

FB: None whatsoever.

NEWS FLASH! Michael Van Schoick (AKA Dave #epicstrut) answers our burning question regarding butt padding via Twitter. Somehow this makes us love the spot even more – praise be to plump rumps!

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85566
Casey Neistat: maverick filmmaker http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/casey-neistat http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/casey-neistat#feedback Mon, 26 Jan 2015 11:58:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85555

Casey Neistat dropped out of high school at 15, became a 'professional dishwasher', and now makes some of the most-watched films on YouTube. This film from Design Indaba tells his story

]]>

Casey Neistat dropped out of high school at 15, became a 'professional dishwasher', and now makes some of the most-watched films on YouTube. This film from Design Indaba tells his story

 

 

In one of his best-known shorts, Neistat vividly demonstrated the problem's with bike lanes in New York City

 

The Design Indaba 2015 conference takes place in Cape Town from February 25 to 27. Full details of the speaker line-up are available here

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85555
Canadian passport reveals its design secrets http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/canadian-passport-black-light-ultra-violet http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/canadian-passport-black-light-ultra-violet#feedback Fri, 23 Jan 2015 16:37:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85487

New Canadian passports have been hiding a whole series of design gems between their innocuous-looking pages; you just need an ultra-violet light to see them...

]]>

Images by Imgur user chachichachichicken

New Canadian passports have been hiding a whole series of design gems between their innocuous-looking pages; you just need an ultra-violet light to see them...

While the new-look passports have been in use since July 2013, there's one aspect to their design that has not (to our knowledge) been duly celebrated until very recently. This week, a post on Imgur via Reddit alerted our attention to one of the most surprising design reveals we've seen. As one commenter pointed out, "It's like a party on every page".

Loaded up onto Imgur user chachichachichicken displayed several shots of his friend's passport: "My buddy got his new Canadian passport and had the wisdom to take a look at it under his black light," he wrote. "We thought we'd share...".

And what a revelation the images turned out to be: each fairly standard-looking page of the passport (historical figures, well-known monuments etc) is brought to life in a blaze of pattern and colour when view under a 'black light' or ultra-violet light source. The design feature acts as an additional security feature that many Canadian's are just unaware of but presumably is viewable at passport desks around the world.

In 2010 I wrote about the UK passport redesign, in which the Identity and Passports Service evoked this isle's sea-faring tradition in its rendering of an Albion of yesteryear. Conversely, it was the very modern design of the Norwegian passport that last year set the internet into a documentation-based frenzy.

Now Canada has revealed its hand. While its certainly not as cooly minimal as the Norwegian effort, it's difficult not to enjoy the party.

The full series of images is at imgur.com. All images by Imgur user chachichachichicken

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85487
Ads of the Week http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/ads-of-the-week2 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/ads-of-the-week2#feedback Fri, 23 Jan 2015 16:31:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85497

Need a laugh? Well you're in luck as this week's advertising round up is filled with comedy spots, including work for Friskies cat food, Loto, Mercedes-Benz, and the Sims 4. Kicking off proceedings is a booty-tastic number from Moneysupermarket, which comes with an 'epic strut'...

]]>

Need a laugh? Well you're in luck as this week's advertising round up is filled with comedy spots, including work for Friskies cat food, Loto, Mercedes-Benz, and Sims4. Kicking off proceedings is a booty-tastic number from Moneysupermarket, which comes with an 'epic strut'...

 

The ad is the latest in a series from Mother ad agency for the UK price comparison website, which all feature people having ludicrous reactions to getting a good deal on their insurance. This is perhaps the best yet, as Dave struts down the street in his hotpants and heels to celebrate the money he's saved. We're not quite sure why Sharon Osbourne pops up at the end though. Director: Fredrik Bond; Production company: Sonny London.

 

Buzzfeed has created a TV spot for the forthcoming Super Bowl in the US. It is the latest in a series by the online publisher for Friskies cat food, and stars a pair of cute kitties planning how to get the most out of the disruption caused by the big game. Cats, as we all know, are a big thing on the internet and there are some nice feline observations here: the ad above is the longer online version, a 60-second cut will play during the Super Bowl.

 

This ad for the French Loto shows two office guys leaving work in style after they win big. We especially enjoyed the version of Born To Be Wild soundtracking the spot. Agency: BETC Paris; ECD: Stéphane Xiberras; Creative director: Olivier Apers; Creatives: Jean-Michel Alirol, Dominique Marchand, Pierre Orizet; Music creative director: Christophe Caurret; Director: Tom Kuntz; Production company: Smile Unlimited/MJZ.

 

FCB New Zealand has created this spot to promote the latest edition of the Sims game. The ad imagines how it would be if you could manipulate people in real life the way you can in the game, to comedic effect. Director: Hamish Rothwell; Production company: Rattling Stick.

 

Our final film this week was created by Mercedes-Benz to celebrate its sponsorship of the Berlin Fashion Week. Whereas most sponsors are fawning towards the event they are associated with, this is instead a brilliantly made mickey-take of fashion films (and to a certain extent the whole industry), titled A Fistful of Wolves. Director: Danny Sangra.

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85497
The Collective Quarterly http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/collective-quarterly http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/collective-quarterly#feedback Thu, 22 Jan 2015 15:35:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85453

New magazine The Collective Quarterly combines travel journalism with an artist residency programme and online shop. We spoke to founders Jesse Lenz and Seth Putnam about the concept and the latest issue, which offers a fascinating look at the sights, scenery and residents of the Absaroka mountain range in rural Montana...

]]>

New magazine The Collective Quarterly combines travel journalism with an artist residency programme and online shop. We spoke to founders Jesse Lenz and Seth Putnam about the concept and the latest issue, which offers a fascinating look at the sights, scenery and residents of the Absaroka mountain range in rural Montana...

Founded in 2013, The Collective Quarterly focuses on a different destination each issue - the pilot explored Marfa, a remote desert town in Texas while issue one, out now, covers Absaroka and Livingston, a tiny city at the foot of the Yellowstone National Park with just a few thousand residents.

As well as some tips on where to eat, drink and stay, each issue features articles documenting the history of the featured destination and the lives of people who live there - issue one includes an interview with a local glassblower as well as articles on husky sledding, fishing, a celebrity chef who lost his hand during a freak accident and the 100-year-old Chico Hot Springs Resort where Jeff Bridges met his wife. There's some stunning photography too, capturing turquoise springs, sweeping mountain ranges and ghost towns filled with long abandoned wooden buildings.

For each issue, the magazine also invites a handful of artists to complete a week-long residency in the area featured, before returning to their home or studio and crafting a piece inspired by their trip. Works are then sold via the magazine's online shop and the process of making it is documented in the issue.

Jesse Lenz, the magazine's creative director and Seth Putnam, its editor, had the idea for the title after meeting by chance through social media: Lenz, an artist who has created editorial illustrations for the New York Times, GQ and Rolling Stone (including last year's brilliant Planet Hillary cover), commented on one of Putnam (a journalist)'s Instagram posts, the pair got talking and discussed the possibility of creating a magazine about the creative process. Combining the idea with travel was a way to make it "relatable", say the pair. "We wanted to make a magazine about people making things, but didn't want some high concept art title. When we looked at what inspired us to create things, it was often travel - going somewhere new, meeting new people - so we decided to put the two ideas together," explains Lenz.

Elk-dog print, taken by Jon Levitt on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana

Horseback baseball cap, made in collaboration with Montana hat maker FairEnds

It takes several months to produce each issue: Putnam and Lenz will research a new location for a few weeks, then visit to meet local residents and "get a feel for the area." Around four months later, they'll visit with an editorial team for a week, gathering stories and carrying out interviews, before being joined by the artists. Photoshoots are commissioned before, during and after each trip.

"Taking this amount of time is costly and it's very labour intensive, but it helps us get deeper, more intimate stories, and visually, we can capture an area in all four seasons," says Putnam. "We visited Livingston in summer and fall, but our photographers also took shots in spring and winter, so you feel like get quite a well-rounded experience when you read [the magazine]," he adds.

Glacier anorak, made by Kristina Angelozzi (Fischer Clothing)

Objects produced by artists in residency so far include photographic prints, woollen blankets, an anorak, a stool and a set of wooden spoons and artists span a range of disciplines, from wood to sculpture and textiles. "We try to bring people from different regions and backgrounds on each trip," explains Lenz. "We have an idea of what they're going to make based on their discipline, but we give them a lot of freedom to explore and create what they want."

While income from limited edition products is fairly modest, it's a platform Putnam and Lenz are looking to expand with each issue. "As well as being a product line, it's a way of bringing the experience of the magazine to readers - you can support the artists featured and feel connected to their experience by buying the outcome of it. We're also looking at creating pop-up events in each location after new issues come out, so people can come along and meet the people featured [in the magazine]," Putnam adds.

The Collective Quarterly isn't the first magazine to focus on one destination per issue - Boat also examines a single city and German magazine Flaneur, a single street - but both tend to focus on well-known cities such as Los Angeles, London and Berlin. Lenz and Putnam, however, are keen to avoid popular tourist spots, opting instead for relatively undiscovered parts of America. The next issue will feature a small town in Vermont and the following Ojai, the smallest city in Ventura Country, California.

"We always look for somewhere unexpected - most people visit Montana to see the two big cities [Helena, the capital and Billings] or the Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks, while Livingston is this tiny town, really off the beaten path, yet there's a surprising amount of actors and writers and painters who've stayed or lived there," explains Lenz.

"We also look for places that are visually interesting - but that doesn't have to mean classically beautiful. Montana was visually overwhelming but we try to capture the less picturesque parts of places too. Sometimes with travel mags, you see these stunning pictures and you're really let down when you get there, so we want to show what places look like in real life, beauty and ugliness," he adds.

There isn't much ugliness in issue one of The Collective Quarterly - even the shots of crumbling buildings and deserted streets are eerily beautiful - but it does feature images of garden workshops, sheep being sheared and fish being gutted, as well as a glimpse inside homes, hotels, bars and local studios.

With scenery varying dramatically from place to place, Lenz says each issue has to be designed almost from scratch by design director Jesse Southerland. "We want each issue to feel as if it was custom made, tailored to that place. We might change the fonts or add some new symbols and extra embellishments - little details to reflect its character and add some excitement," he explains.

"We do have a loose template, but we want the magazine to be surprising," adds Putnam. "A lot of people approach quarterly magazines a bit like a book, but you can have a lot more fun with magazine layouts."

Like Boat and Flaneur, The Collective Quarterly's appeal lies not just in its use of beautiful imagery, but in its in-depth treatment of destinations: by focusing on a single town or city per issue, it aims to capture the character of a place, rather than merely point its readers in the direction of key sights, restaurants or tourist highlights.

"It's almost like the magazine makes people feel like a local, because they can go [to a place] knowing some of the residents and their stories, where they go and how they like to spend their time," says Putnam. "I think it's important to give readers some practical content - a 36-hour itinerary, for example - but what really inspires me are human interest stories," he adds.

With slow journalism and documentary style travel magazines becoming increasingly popular, The Collective Quarterly has some tough competition (Cereal, too, combines long form articles with beautiful photography, while The American Guide, a crowdsourced series of titles, explores each of America's states). But with its artist residency programme and e-commerce site, coupled with its choice of small, remote destinations, it has carved out an interesting niche. It's a fascinating read and a great platform for local artists and designers to showcase their work.

Issue one of The Collective Quarterly costs $25 and is available to buy at collectivequarterly.com. Issues will be on sale at selected UK shops later this year.

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85453
PJ Harvey at Somerset House http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/pj-harvey-at-somerset-house http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/pj-harvey-at-somerset-house#feedback Thu, 22 Jan 2015 15:28:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85461

PJ Harvey is currently recording her ninth album in a specially constructed studio in the New Wing at Somerset House in London. And, as part of a project created with Artangel, members of the public can go in and watch her...

]]>

Identity and graphic design for the Recording In Progress project by Julia

 

PJ Harvey is currently recording her ninth album in a specially constructed studio in the New Wing at Somerset House in London. And, as part of a project created with Artangel, members of the public can go in and watch her...

Titled Recording In Progress, the project offers a rare opportunity to see an artist at work. The studio, which has been created by Something & Son, features two large, one-way windows, from which viewers can peer into the space and see Harvey, her producers Flood and John Parish, and her fellow musicians and technicians working on her album. Everything they say or do is relayed to viewers via speakers. For those in the studio, the windows look blacked out, so they are, to all intents and purposes, working in the same way that they would in any studio.

It's understandable if this all sounds a bit gimmicky. There have been experiments such as this before – as part of the art project fig-1 (a series of week-long exhibitions that took place over a year in London in 2000), author and journalist Will Self took up residency in a small Soho gallery and worked on a short story. Visitors were invited to come by and, if they proved inspiring enough to Self, they might find themselves appearing in the text. Similarly, in 2008, Grazia's staff moved into Westfield shopping centre in London for a week, and created an issue of the magazine in full view of the public.

Perhaps what sets Harvey's experiment apart from these projects however, is the sense of spying, or eavesdropping, on the musicians at work – we are not there to be part of the creative process, merely to watch it, silently. I remember visiting Self at fig-1 and being struck by the awkwardness of the occasion – the audience all sat deferentially at his feet, while he worked on a laptop in the centre. It was hard to imagine anything more removed from a normal working environment.

Initially, on entering the space around Harvey's studio, it all seems similarly contrived – the various instruments, including saxophones and an old piano, feel like props – but as the viewers settle into the environment and tune into what's going on inside the studio, the sense of pretense fades. As we watch, the musicians slowly work together to develop a version of a song and what initially feels incomprehensible to the layperson – there is a lot of talk of tuning drums – suddenly emerges into a fully formed, and very beautiful, piece of music. The musicians seem excited about what they have accomplished and, somehow, we audience feel part of that experience too.

There have been many films made of musicians in recording studios. At the artier end of the spectrum there are works such as Steve McQueen's film of Tricky: a portrait of the musician which reflects the act of performing and recording as an intensely physical experience. Compelling as McQueen's film is, it avoids any of the banality of recording that is revealed by Harvey and her band: there are exciting moments, but also plenty of dull ones in the 45 minutes we are allowed to watch.

Perhaps a better parallel is found in Jean-Luc Godard's film One Plus One, which intercuts footage of The Rolling Stones recording the song Sympathy For The Devil with seemingly unrelated scenes. Godard relays the protacted development of recording, and some of its ordinariness, though by switching back and forth between this and the other, at times perplexing, scenes, he gives the recording process a theatrical atmosphere. In Harvey's piece too, there is a sense of performance lying above that of the ordinary studio experience – it's impossible not to wonder what she, and the other musicians, feel about working knowing that strangers are peering in, and how it might be affecting their behaviour.

In the booklet given out to visitors to Recording In Progress, Harvey talks at length in an interview with Artangel's Michael Morris about how important studios have been in the creation of her previous albums. "The acoustics of a particular space are inevitably captured in the sounds of the recordings – but more than that, the resonance of the building on a different level – its atmosphere, its character," she says.

It is interesting to discover that Harvey herself instigated this project (having been in discussions with Artangel for some time about possible ideas) and that the decision to record in Somerset House was carefully chosen. "Acoustically the room sounds right to me," she says,"the journey to the room has a particular atmosphere too – you have to walk through the Inland Revenue's old rifle range to get to their former staff gymnasium. The Tax Office was here since the late 18th Century, until fairly recently, and a range of different offices regulating public life, from The Stamp Office and The Navy Office to the registry of births, marriages and deaths... All that history will fuel me and help tap into a different level of consiousness."

At one point as I watched, Harvey commented, "I think it might just work, this crazy experiment". She was speaking of a specific moment in the act of creating the album – again to do with the drums, I think – but it feels like this comment could sum up the whole project. When our 45 minutes were up, the sound was abruptly cut off and the band, which we were by now totally tuned into, were muted, leaving us behind. There was an audible gasp of dismay from the audience: what will happen next? I guess we'll all just have to wait until the album is released to find out.

Recording In Progress will take place until February 14. Currently all slots to view are sold out, though more were put on sale unexpectedly just last week so it's worth keeping an eye on somersethouse.org.uk/recordinginprogress or artangel.org.uk/pjharvey in case of any further developments.

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85461
CR February: Yum! It's the Food issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/feb-issue-food http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/january/feb-issue-food#feedback Thu, 22 Jan 2015 10:36:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=85454

Our February issue looks at how creativity is changing what and how we eat, with features on the story behind the Leon fast-food chain, apps for farmers in the developing world, the Disappearing Dining Club, trends in food photography and initiatives to tackle food wastage

]]>

Our February issue looks at how creativity is changing what and how we eat, with features on the story behind the Leon fast-food chain, apps for farmers in the developing world, the Disappearing Dining Club, trends in food photography and initiatives to tackle food wastage

 

The best way to ensure you never miss an issue of CR is to subscribe and save up to 30% off the cover price. Full details are here

Subscribers also receive a range of discounts plus exclusive access to members-only events via CR Club (currently you can get free tickets to the Leeds Print Festival and 20% off all Phaidon food books)

Rachael Steven meets the founders and design team at Leon, the restaurant chain with a fresh perspective on fast food

 

Mark Sinclair looks at how publisher Phaidon has applied its artistic heritage to its growing range of beautiful recipe books

 

Mark also reports on new initiatives that are being introduced to tackle the huge global food waste problem

 

Next, we take a look at the story behind the Haller app, one of a series of smart phone apps that are revolutionising farming and food production in developing countries

 

Eliza Williams meets Stuart Langley, founder of the Disappearing Dining Club, which serves up great food in unexpected locations to create memorable nights out

 

And Antonia Wilson reports on the current trends in photography and food styling, includng the importance of leaving in the crumbs, spills and smears to create deliciously authentic imagery

 

Amsterdam's Bilder & De Clercq grocery stores offer a new approach to home cooking, with great design too. Eliza Williams reports

 

And Silas Amos picks out the major trends from the Pentawards annual

 

Of course, we also have our regular columnists: Daniel Benneworth-Gray attempts to make a list of new year's resolutions; Michael Evamy bemoans the logos of the various UK political parties in advance of the general election in May and Paul Belford deconstructs a classic Big Issue poster

 

And Gemma Fletcher reviews the Guy Bourdin retrospective at Somerset House in London

 

 

Our cover this month was created and photographed by Massimo Gammacurta using a mixture of sugar, corn syrup and water to create the letterforms, which were then shot on glass. The logo was cast in sugar.

 

This is the second issue in what has been a change of strategy for CR. Over the next year, you will see us covering the creative industries from a wider perspective. Each issue will do this by exploiting a particular theme: in March, this will be Entertainment (including gaming, Film and TV) while our April theme will be Health

The best way to ensure you never miss an issue of CR is to subscribe and save up to 30% off the cover price. Full details are here


Subscribers also receive a range of discounts plus exclusive access to members-only events via CR Club (currently you can get free tickets to the Leeds Print Festival and 20% off all Phaidon food books)


Thanks to a new distribution deal, we are also available at WH Smith and other newsagents nationwide in the UK

]]>
http://www.creativereview.co.uk/dynamic.php?page_id=85454