CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Fri, 24 Apr 2015 16:53:01 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 Ads of the Week http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/ads-of-the-week2 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/ads-of-the-week2#feedback Fri, 24 Apr 2015 15:50:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88773

This week's advertising round-up has it all: an interactive ad, an Instagram ad, even a few TV spots. Kicking off proceedings though is this lovely, Captain Pugwash-esque poster campaign for the English National Opera's forthcoming Pirates of Penzance show, directed by Mike Leigh...

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This week's advertising round-up has it all: an interactive ad, an Instagram ad, even a few TV spots. Kicking off proceedings though is this lovely, Captain Pugwash-esque poster campaign for the English National Opera's forthcoming Pirates of Penzance show, directed by Mike Leigh...

As Paul Belford has pointed out recently, a brilliant poster campaign can improve the urban landscape, and this ad, illustrated by Toby Leigh, is currently doing a great job of cheering up the hallways of various stations on the London Underground.

 

Next, a delightful Icelandic saga for Arla Skyr yoghurt, directed by Dougal Wilson. Agency: Wieden + Kennedy London; Creative directors: Dave Day, Larry Seftel; Creatives: Thom Whitaker, Danielle Noel; ECDs: Tony Davidson, Iain Tait; Production company: Blink.

 

The first of two campaigns based on silent movies now. This TV spot is for Kellogg's Crunchy Nut and is a nice spin on the brand's familiar 'trouble is they taste too good' campaign. Directed by Daniel Kleinman, the ad is inspired by early films such as Nosferatu and The Cabinet of Caligari, and to get into the spirit of things, the crew wore period clothing throughout the shoot (Kleinman is shown in plus 4s above, right). Agency: Leo Burnett; ECD: Justin Tindall; Creative director: Guy Moore; Creative: Hugh Todd; Production company: Rattling Stick.

 

Continuing the silent movie theme is this sweet campaign for the Toronto Silent Film Festival, which offers audiences the chance to create their own 'choose your own adventure' silent films via Instagram in a nice mix of old and new technologies. The film above explains how it works, and visit instagram.com/tsff2015 to make your own film. Agency: Red Lion Canada; CCO: Matthew Litzinger.

 

Grey London has created this powerful PSA in association with Mumsnet, which aims to encourage parents to teach kids how to dial 999. The film, which sits as part of an information website at 999forkids.com, features audio footage of an emergency call by five year-old Elleemae, who saved her mum's life by dialling 999. Set to footage mixing imagery from the family with new content, it's emotional stuff. Creative director: Nils Leonard; Creatives: Vicki Maguire, Jonathan Marlow; Director: Frederic Planchon; Production company: Academy.

 

Up now is an interactive ad-cum-music video for detergent brand Skip from BBH London. The film, which can be found online at youtube.com/SkipSouthAfrica, lets viewers switch outfits on the dancers while also picking up handy washing tips. Creatives: Simon Pearse, Emmanuel Saint M'Leux; Creative directors: Carl Broadhurst, Peter Reid; Director: Luis Cerveró; Production company: Blink.

 

We close this week's round up with a quirky campaign for fonts website, Fontyou, which features a series of amusing animated shorts that make the point that sometimes fonts get old, and it's time to look for new ones. Agencies: TBWA\Paris and \Else; Creatives: Cedric Moutaud, Vincent Pedrocchi; Illustrator: Laurent Duvoux; Production: \Else.

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Sony World Photography Awards 2015 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/sony-world-photography-awards-2015 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/sony-world-photography-awards-2015#feedback Fri, 24 Apr 2015 15:10:00 +0000 Antonia Wilson http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88766

The winners of the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards have been announced, with American photographer John Moore from Getty Images winning the L'Iris d'Or Photographer of the Year award, for his series depicting the Ebola crisis in Liberia.

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The winners of the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards have been announced, with American photographer John Moore from Getty Images winning the L'Iris d'Or Photographer of the Year award, for his series depicting the Ebola crisis in Liberia.

His work has been universally credited for the early exposure of the scale of the Ebola epidemic in Monrovia, the capital of Liberia. In a collective statement, the judges said of the work: "Moore's photographs of this crisis show in full the brutality of people's daily lives torn apart by this invisible enemy. However, it is his spirit in the face of such horror that garners praise. His images are intimate and respectful, moving us with their bravery and journalistic integrity. It is a fine and difficult line between images that exploit such a situation, and those that convey the same with heart, compassion and understanding, which this photographer has achieved with unerring skill. Combine this with an eye for powerful composition and cogent visual narrative, and good documentary photography becomes great."

Now in its eighth year, the annual awards celebrate work across a range of genres, are free to enter, and this year saw a record-breaking 173,444 images submitted from 171 countries.

Here's our pick from the professional category winners and shortlisted work...

Winner of the Contemporary Issues category - Butterflies Chapter 3 by Scott Typaldos, Switzerland

2nd place in the Contemporary Issues category - Corentin Fohlen, France

Shortlisted in the Contemporary Issues category - First Sight by Brent Stirton, South Africa

Shortlisted in the Campaign category - The Wrestler by Fei Maohua, China

Shortlisted in the Arts & Culture category - Purim Holiday in Jerusalem by Gili Yaari, Israel

Shortlisted in the Current Affairs category - Ukraine. Kiev. Euromaidan by Vladyslav Musiienko

Shortlisted in the Landscape category - Blue Fields by Simon Butterworth, UK

3rd place in the Landscape category - Ganges, Death of a River by Giulio di Sturco, Italy

Winner of the Lifestyle category - Ethnic Yi People Living in the Great Liangshan Mountains of China by Li Fan China

3rd place in the Lifestyle category - Cat Mother by Ramil Gilvanov, Russia

Shortlisted for the the Lifestyle category - Everland Korea by Julia Fullerton-Batton, UK

Shortlisted in the People category - One hundred and forty centimetres by Sabine Lewandowski, Germany

Shortlisted in the People category - Ich bin Waldviertel by Carla Kogelman, Netherlands

2nd place in the Portraiture category - Glasgow; Second City of The Empire. On the run up to the Scottish Referendum by Dougie Wallace, UK

Shortlisted in the Portraiture category - CAESAR by Christian Berthelot, France

Shortlisted in the Portraiture category - Aftermath by Kerry Mansfield, US

2nd place in the Still Life category - Review by Peter Franck, Germany

Winner of the Travel category - Aerial Views Adria by Bernhard Lang, Germany

In the Open competition, for amateur photographers, Antony Crossfield from the UK, won the Enhanced category.

Christine Kapuschinsky Johnson, US, was shortlisted in the Open competition in the Smile category,

Saeed Barikani, Iran, was shortlisted in the People category (Open competition),

Ismail Abdul Mutalib, Indonesia, was shortlisted in the Travel category (Open competition),

Peter Voss, Germany, was shortlisted in the People category (Open competition),

and Lessy Sebastian, Indonesia, was shortlisted in the Split Second category (Open competition).

New for the year, the Mobile Phone competition recognises the ability of mobile phone technology to capture everyday moments that would otherwise go unnoticed, and was awarded to Turi Calfato from Italy, for this image taken as part of the series A day on the beach (above left). 2nd place went to Jans M Schmidt from Hungary (above centre) and Ako Salemi from Iran took 3rd place (above right).

The Outstanding Contribution to photography went to Magnum photographer Elliott Erwitt, for a 60 year career in advertising and documentary photography, known for his candid black and white shots capturing ironic and absurd moments in everyday scenes (above). Overall Open competition winner was Armin Appel, Germany; Youth Photographer of the Year went to 19-year-old Yong Lin Tan, Malaysia; and Student Photographer of the Year went to Svetlana Blagodavera, Russia.

All the winning and shortlisted images, plus a special exhibition celebrating Elliott Erwin, will be exhibited at Somerset House, London from 24 April - 10 May. somersethouse.org.uk

See more of the winning and shortlisted works, plus the other images in the series featured above at worldphoto.org

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D&AD judging week http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/dad-judging-week http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/dad-judging-week#feedback Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:50:00 +0000 Patrick Burgoyne http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88772

It's long been an ambition of D&AD to make the judging process not only more open but also more of an industry event in its own right, a place for wider discussion about creativity and how it is applied. And a bit more fun too. This week, they pulled it off

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It's long been an ambition of D&AD to make the judging process not only more open but also more of an industry event in its own right, a place for wider discussion about creativity and how it is applied. And a bit more fun too. This week, they pulled it off

Though an undoubted privilege, judging awards can be a pretty exhausting, numbing experience, often not helped by the surroundings. The logistics of the bigger shows dictate that jury sessions usually take place in exhibition halls or similalrly soulless venues. D&AD has previously been judged at the ExCel centre and more recently the grand but cavernous Olympia.

 

This year was completey different. The whole shebang was relocated to the Truman Brewery, just off Brick Lane in the heart of hipster London, which felt far more appropriate. It's a big, rambling space but, thanks to the work of Craig Oldham and Marion Deuchars, D&AD turned it into a vibrant, exciting venue.

Visitors were greeted by a row of placards making various calls to the creative barricades - "Good is not good enough" and "Sink the shallow". The campaigning theme was carried on throughout the building with large-scale wall paintings demanding an end to mediocrity among other things.

 

The work to be judged was laid out on rows of trestles, on screens and tall boards with, by Thursday, stickers noting which had been awarded a pencil (though not which type). It all felt energetic and fun.

 

But the best bit was that on that Thursday, the judging venue was thrown open to public, professionals and students alike. Anyone in the area could pop in and see the work in the flesh. Not only that but members of the juries appeared throughout the day to answer questions on the choices they had made.

I compered one of these sessions, with three judges from different crafts juries. In front of an audience composed of both students and professionals, they discussed the criteria they were asked to judge by and picked out one piece of work they all liked and one that had split their jury. Curiously, all three juries had debated one particular project – a series of illustrations promoting Penguin audio books – with debates around whether pastiche should be awarded, how clearly the work communicated and how well the craft of the illustration served the central idea.

It was very refereshing to see such open discussion (with no attempt by D&AD to limit it). Beyond our stage, visitors leafed through the work on display, taking photographs and discussing what they did and didn't like.

For me it all realy helped bring D&AD judging to life, tie it in to the organisation's newly confident mission around the White Pencil and, I hope, broke down some of the barriers and mystery around the process that may have proved off-putting to some in the past. But I'd be intrigued to hear from any readers who also went along.

 

 

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Our picks from Pick Me Up 2015 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/pick-me-up-2015 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/pick-me-up-2015#feedback Thu, 23 Apr 2015 15:04:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88746

Graphic arts festival Pick Me Up opened at London's Somerset House last night, with talks, workshops, screenings and exhibitions taking place until May 4. Here's a look at some of our favourite work on show and what's on over the next few days...

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Graphic arts festival Pick Me Up opened at London's Somerset House last night, with talks, workshops, screenings and exhibitions taking place until May 4. Here's a look at some of our favourite work on show and what's on over the next few days...

Each year, Pick Me Up showcases work from illustrators, creative collectives and galleries alongside a programme of graphic arts-related talks and workshops. The event also includes Pick Me Up's annual Selects exhibition, which features work by new and emerging illustration talent chosen by a panel of judges (this year's are Sara Andreasson; Hattie Newman; Jack Cunningham; Luke Evans; Gaurab Thakali; Jennifer Argo; Laura Jouan; Peter Judson; Rop van Mierlo; Thomas Lamadieu; Laura Callaghan and Zoë Taylor).

Each artist is asked to submit a series of prints, and this year’s show also places more emphasis on process – glass display cases house sketches, notebooks and draft copies of work, giving visitors more of an insight into each illustrator's craft and working methods, such as this from paper artist Hattie Newman:

 

Sara Andreasson's display (pictured top) includes some beautiful large-scale prints, while Jack Cunningham has created a sweet series of 3D printed dinosaurs, on show alongside a new print and animation showreel:

 

Kingston graduate Luke Evans is displaying his degree show project, Xero - a series of prints created using powder and 400,000 volts of electricity (you can read our interview with Evans here):

 

Camberwell graduate Gaurab Thakali's display includes a mix of new work and jazz-inspired prints created for his degree show project last year:

 

Laura Callaghan has submitted some imaginative and highly detailed scenes depicting a range of female characters:

 

And Rop van Mierlo has created a charming, and unusual, series of animal portraits:

 

Upstairs, 16 collectives are showcasing prints, postcards, accessories and other illustrated ware for sale - including Glasgow risograph printing studio Risotto; Melbourne's Supergraph; Italian group Studio Fludd; Scope Studio, which has collaborated with illustrators including Kyle Platts and Kate Copeland to create a series of tiles which visitors can use to make prints:

 

And Niles, a new illustration group founded by Bath School of Art and Design graduates Joe Gamble, Elliot Kruszynski, Alice Russell, Caroline Dunning and Alice Bowsher.

 

Blink Art has curated an original display inspired by 1980s Scratch-Art, with work from Rob Flowers and The Layzell Brothers, created especially for Pick Me Up (visitors can also make their own mini versions to win a free print):

 

While Moth Collective is showcasing some lovely animation work, including spots for NSPCC and this for the Global Canopy Programme, a think tank researching ways to preserve tropical forests:

 

Downstairs, Peckham Print Studio has taken over a gallery space to showcase artwork and host workshops for children and grown ups throughout the festival, and there's also a shop selling illustrated books from the likes of Nobrow, Laurence King and Flying Eye, as well as independent magazines such as Wrap and Varoom.

 

In previous years, there's been criticism of Pick Me Up's focus on presenting goods for sale, particularly given the £10 entry fee (or £17.50 for a festival pass). The format is much the same this year, so it's likely this will once again be a point of contention for some, but it's still a visual treat for those who are there to browse instead of buy.

In the collective displays in particular, some of the work feels a little familiar (the trend for Memphis Group inspired illustration, which Gavin Lucas wrote about in our July 2014 issue, is clearly still going strong), but as Pick Me Up is aimed at the general public as well as the industry, it's hardly surprising given this style's continued popularity. There are some familiar names, too, but there's also plenty of inventive and surprising work from fresh new faces.

Pick Me Up has also worked hard to curate a great schedule of talks, workshops and screenings this year, which visitors can drop in and out of on their visit. These include showings of excerpts from new film Made You Look, about the UK creative industry, Crowd Rounds, a late night talk exploring the rise of memes, emojis and tumblr art in visual culture and a Cover Club event with Ian Anderson and Secret 7" founder Kevin King.

Jeremy Leslie will be talking to independent magazines including Riposte, the Gourmand and Delayed Gratification in daily MagCulture sessions; while various studios and this year's selects will be discussing their processes, inspiration and recent projects.

There will also be a talk on a different issue affecting graphic art each day, each from a different speaker - Times cartoonist Martin Rowson is discussing cartoons and politics, V&A curator Catherine Flood, activist graphics, Lawrence Zeegen, commercial illustration versus socio-political work and Graham McCallum, how a move from analogue to digital has affected graphic art.

For the full line-up, click here. Pick Me Up is open from 10am until 6pm daily (and until 10pm Wednesdays and Thursdays) until May 4. For visitor's details, see somersethouse.org.uk

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Chris Milk on how VR can make us more empathetic http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/chris-milk-on-how-virtual-reality-can-make-us-more-empathetic http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/chris-milk-on-how-virtual-reality-can-make-us-more-empathetic#feedback Thu, 23 Apr 2015 15:03:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88745

Director Chris Milk has become renowned for work that mixes cutting edge technology with old-fashioned, emotional storytelling. In this recent TED talk, he explains how virtual reality offers the opportunity for viewers to engage more deeply with other people's stories than ever before...

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Director Chris Milk has become renowned for work that mixes cutting edge technology with old-fashioned, emotional storytelling. In this recent TED talk, he explains how virtual reality offers the opportunity for viewers to engage more deeply with other people's stories than ever before...

Virtual reality has been seized upon by brands and ad agencies recently as the latest hot new thing. Many of its uses so far have been in the style of gaming, but in this short and entertaining talk, Milk offers a vision of a VR future where we can use the headsets to understand each other better. "It's a machine," he says, "but through this machine we become more compassionate, we become more empathetic and we become more connected, and ultimately we become more human."

 

 

Milk's forays into virtual reality so far include a work he shot for the United Nations where he followed a 12 year-old Syrian refugee named Sidra in the Za'atari camp in Jordan. The resulting work was then shown to attendees at the World Economic Forum in Davos in January. One of the problems for VR at this stage is its inaccessibility: headsets are still rare and viewers usually only get the opportunity to view VR experiences at events. But by deliberately targeting an audience at Davos, the UN turned this exclusivity into an advantage. They may not have shown the work to many, but they knew that every viewer was in a position of power.

Milk plans to shoot more VR pieces for the UN, focusing on communities in need. "When you're sitting there in her room watching her, you're not watching it through a television screen, you're not watching it through a window, you're sitting there with her," he says of the film about Sidra. "When you look down, you're sitting on the same ground that she's sitting on, and because of that, you feel her humanity in a deeper way. You emphasise with her in a deeper way. I think we can change minds with this machine."

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CR Annual 2015 plus our May issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/cr-annual-2015-may-luxury-issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/cr-annual-2015-may-luxury-issue#feedback Thu, 23 Apr 2015 10:03:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88722

It's our biggest issue of the year, featuring The Annual, our 100-page showcase of the year's best work, back-to-back with this month's edition of CR which takes Luxury as its theme

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It's our biggest issue of the year, featuring The Annual, our 100-page showcase of the year's best work, back-to-back with this month's edition of CR which takes Luxury as its theme

The CR Annual 2015 in association with Arjowiggins Creative Papers features the pick of creative work from the past year, as chosen by our panel of judges.

As always, the work is displayed in chronological order with the best of the best featuring in our Best in Book section. Supporting video content for some entries is available to view via the Blippar smartphone app: download the app and hold it over the relevant page to watch the video on your phone.

Watch out for further posts on this site where we will reveal all our Best in Book winners as well as our creative agency of the year and client of the year.

 

The Annual was launched at a party at House of Vans in London where all the Best in Book winners picked up their trophies (one shown above). All the selected Annual work is on display at a free exhibition which is open until Sunday April 26.

The exhibition also features Aleph, the one-minute film featuring Daria Werbowy directed by Warren Du Preez and Nick Thornton Jones from which our Annual cover image comes. The background story on our cover and how it was made is here. Thanks to our exhibition print partner The Color Company, our trophy partner EFX and to Estrella Damm or the beer.

As always with our Annual, this is a double issue of the magazine. Flip it over and start again for this month's theme, Luxury.

We talk to London College of Fashion's Professor Dilys Williams about luxury fashion's ethical opportunity, while, with its use on everything from toilet paper to bread sauce, ‘luxury' has become a tricky concept to talk about says Nick Asbury

With traditional luxury brands undermining their exclusivity, is art the ultimate luxury good? Plus, Michael Evamy explores the weird world of luxury logos, where a great creation myth and some idiosyncratic imagery trumps brand orthodoxy

 

The V&A’s What is Luxury? show will question the future and present of the luxury industry: we talk to co-curator Jana Scholze about how our attitudes toward luxury and what it represents are changing

 

We talk tactility, print and paper with Arjowiggins’ Christophe Balaresque, illustrated by a beautiful exclusive photostory by photographer Owen Silverwood, art director Gemma Fletcher and set designer Owen Gildersleeve

 

As new watch magazine The Hour launches, Mark Sinclair talks to editor Josh Sims and design studio Bibliothèque about our relationship with this evocative object and how a new breed of independent watchmakers is challenging the appeal of luxury brands via innovation and design

And we talk to the team behind our cover image and film starring supermodel Daria Werbowy, including FBFX, floristry artist Rebecca Louise Law and post-production house Analog about how the project came together.

 

And rounding off this bumper issue, Adrian Shaughnessy reviews a new book of portraits created by Hipgnosis featuring many images never before published

The Creative Review Annual 2015 in association with Arjowiggins Creative Papers is available to buy in WHSmith stores nationwide, at selected independent retailers, and online with a subscription (subscribers will also receive access to discounts, offers and exclusive events as part of our membership scheme, CR Club).

 

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Channel 4's NewsWall presents the news, in GIFs http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/the-news-in-gifs http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/the-news-in-gifs#feedback Wed, 22 Apr 2015 15:21:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88703

Channel 4 has launched a brilliant new website presenting daily headlines from around the world as GIFs, which aims to repackage online news in a format appealing to teens and young adults...

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Channel 4 has launched a brilliant new website presenting daily headlines from around the world as GIFs, which aims to repackage online news in a format more appealing to teens and young adults...

Hosted on Tumblr, the NewsWall is aimed at 16-34-year-olds and features a rolling feed of news stories repurposed as GIFs. Users can click on GIFs to read a more detailed summary of each story, and access a link to the original source.

The concept was devised by 4Creative's Jack Croft and Stacey Bird, who worked with illustrator Chris Rice to create the GIFs featured on the site so far. The trio have been based at ITN's headquarters since the site's launch, working with the news production team to curate a new selection of stories each day.

"We are managing to do about 9 a day - with copywriting and research, GIF creation and sign off this is the most we can physically do," Croft, Rice and Bird told CR. The group won't be based at ITN permanently, and will soon be handing responsibility for GIFs over to the Channel 4 News team, but say they will still make the occasional GIF from their offices at 4Creative.

As Croft and Bird explain, creating GIFs based own serious news stories that will appeal to younger audiences is a tricky task, but the site perfectly captures Channel 4's irreverent tone of voice, providing humorous and silly imagery (such as the GIF created for an article about Milifandom, below) alongside more hard-hitting content on recent xenophobic attacks in South Africa and the news that ISIS was allegedly masterminded by a former spy for Sadam Hussein. While many GIFs link to Channel 4 news content, the site also contains articles from around the web, explain Croft and Bird.

"To appeal to a wider audience we aren't just covering Channel 4 News stories, so we have a range of headlines that have been curated between us and Jon Laurence - the digital editor of Channel 4 News. Plus, we sometimes need to take a judgement call and some stories just aren't right to see in GIF," they add.

Images are sourced from a mix of Getty and Reuters images, Channel 4 News footage and footage shot by the group on their phones. "The limitations of imagery are what has made us become more creative with the executions," explain Croft and Bird, who describe it as "the most on-the-fly way we have ever had to work."

 

While GIFs and memes are a staple of the internet (thousands are posted on Twitter and Facebook in response to news stories and viral videos every day), Channel 4 claims the platform is the first GIF news service of its kind. In its humour and tone of voice, it's also reminiscent of the work Richard Turley has been doing with MTV, repurposing animations, news media and user-generated content from around the web to create GIFs and bumpers for the channel and its social media and web pages.

It's an interesting example of how traditional broadcasters can repackage news content in a way that appeals to younger audiences online, in a style more in keeping with the visual language of social media - in a press release announcing NewsWall, Olivia Browne, group business director at 4Creative says the site was set up to provide "an innovative way of reaching a younger demographic with the news - that spoke their language, and went to where they were. News in GIFs had never been done before, and we liked the purity of an animated headline that distilled the news down to the heart of the story and could also be engaging, entertaining, and at times irreverent."

As Eliza Williams wrote about in our March issue, Vice has also enjoyed great success creating news which appeals to teen and young adult audiences through its Vice News channel on YouTube. The channel was founded with the intention of serving a different style of video news to that offered by mainstream broadcasters, offering films which are often longer, more graphic or presented in a looser style than those made by TV channels, and now has over 190 million views on YouTube and 1.2 million subscribers.

As Kevin Sutcliffe, head of news programming EU at Vice News, told Williams in our feature, the format of television news in particular has remained largely unchanged for decades - and if broadcasters really want to engage with young adults, they have to try and create something that feels fresh and different. "The reason [traditional news reporting] doesn't speak to a young audience is obvious - it's middle-aged journalists in suits and ties talking to middle-aged journalists in suits and ties in studios. Or out on live links in front of something going-on - it feels formal, it feels mediated, it feels talked-down-to."

With a mix of irreverent video content and serious investigative journalism (such as its 43-minute film on IS), Vice has also shown that offering a more youth-oriented alternative to traditional news coverage doesn't have to mean "dumbing down" - and can applied to serious stories as well as light-hearted ones. While not every story can be condensed to a brief GIF, C4's NewsWall offers a carefully selected mix of serious and silly news in a much more visually compelling format than a traditional homepage (though as Bird and Croft point out, not every story can, or should be, reduced to a GIF).

Channel 4 has also been using various tactics to encourage under 25's to take part in this year's General Election - it recently launched a campaign titled 'X', which invited users to sign up for free personalised text messages reminding them to vote on May 7, is streaming a Youth Leaders Debate on April 28 and on May 7, will be switching off E4 from 7am until polling stations close to encourage viewers to go out and vote (an idea also thought up by Croft and Bird).

As a film launching on air tonight explains, viewers who tune in on election day will simply be met with animated footage of 'Darren' - "the guy in charge of making sure E4 is on" - manning an empty control room, instead of the usual programmes and ads:

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Met Police explain how the Hatton Garden job was done in handy interactive guide http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/hatton-garden-interactive http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/hatton-garden-interactive#feedback Wed, 22 Apr 2015 13:39:00 +0000 Patrick Burgoyne http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88701

Easter's daring Hatton Garden raid in London seemed like something straight out of a heist movie. Now the Metropolitan Police have brought the details of the robbery dramatically to life in an interactive piece of content created using the thinglink platform

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Easter's daring Hatton Garden raid in London seemed like something straight out of a heist movie. Now the Metropolitan Police have brought the details of the robbery dramatically to life in an interactive piece of content created using the thinglink platform

Time was the most elaborate communications effort we could expect from the police about a major crime would be a harrassed-looking copper sitting behind a desk trying not to answer questions from the press pack. But we live in the age of interactive digital media – something the Met appear to have enthusiastically embraced with the release of an interactive detailing the whole process of the Hatton Garden Burglary.

Using thinglink, a platform that allows users to add rich media links to images, the Met has combined phtotos of the crime scene with details of how the robbers did it and audo files all embedded in a diagram of the robbery distributed to the media. (Full link here)

 

 

So if you want to know how to pull off a major jewellery heist, here it all is. What woud Jack Regan make of it we wonder?

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RightsInfo: the online guide to human rights http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/rightsinfo http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/rightsinfo#feedback Wed, 22 Apr 2015 10:34:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88674

RightsInfo is a new website which aims to provide a concise and engaging online guide to human rights. Inspired by news sites such as Buzzfeed and the BBC, it uses infographics and custom illustrations to summarise key human rights developments and cases in a bitesize, shareable format...

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RightsInfo is a new website which aims to provide a concise and engaging online guide to human rights. Inspired by news sites such as Buzzfeed and the BBC, it uses infographics and custom illustrations to summarise key human rights developments and cases in a bitesize, shareable format...

Designed by digital agency Hikkendry and featuring infographics and illustrations by IIB Studio, RightsInfo offers a basic introduction to human rights for UK and EU residents. Launched at an event in London last night, the site presents a timeline of human rights developments, dating from the Magna Carta to the present day and an illustrated guide to protection offered by the European Convention and the Human Rights Act. It also contains a section debunking popular human rights myths.

The site was was founded by Adam Wagner, a human rights lawyer and editor of the Human Rights Blog, which reports on cases and policies. While his blog is aimed at legal professionals and those with an interest in or knowledge of the area, however, Rights Info assumes users have no prior knowledge of the subject and is aimed at "anyone who uses the internet and has an interest in social issues," says Wagner.

 

 

Wagner says he set up the site as he wanted to provide a free and easily accessible guide to human rights, where audiences could read accurate information in an easily digestible format.

"Most of the information available online is either found in very long and complicated statutes and official documents, or it's reported by newspapers, who all have their own political agendas," explains Wagner. "There's no clear, free, impartial information for people who just want to found out how they are protected by human rights, and what existing human rights law is actually for," he adds.

 

 

Wagner says he also hopes the site will challenge popular misconceptions about human rights courts and legal rulings, and highlight positive cases which are often overlooked in favour of more sensationalist stories.

"People are often under the impression that human rights law is more concerned with protecting criminals or illegal immigrants [but] we want to tell stories about how it affects everyone, from victims of crime and soldiers who've been injured in combat, to victims of hospital malpractice or vulnerable children and the elderly, and I hope the site will offer that in a way people haven't seen before."

When designing RightsInfo, Wagner says he was particularly keen to adopt a visual approach and informal tone of voice, inspired by successful news sites such as Buzzfeed, the BBC and the Guardian: copy is concise and free of legal jargon, and cheerful illustrations and diagrams are used throughout. Wagner says he was also keen to avoid using cliched legal imagery such as doves, scales and handshakes.

The site is colour coded to aid navigation - health-related content, for example, is marked in green, while disability is represented by orange. A section entitled 'what human rights do for us' presents a series of statements relating to different protections offered under current law (pictured below). Each is accompanied by a link to an article about a related case on the Human Rights Blog and the full judgment, plus links to tweet or post the item on social media.

Another section, titled 'The 14 worst human rights myths’, challenges commonly held assumptions about human rights, highlighting potentially misleading news reports and asserting the facts surrounding recent cases covered in the media.


 

For the next 50 days, Wagner says RightsInfo will also be publishing a new article each day on the blog section of the site, offering a summary of the 50 most significant human rights cases in recent history. Stories will be under 300 words and again written in "plain English."

As creative director Yoav Segal points out, the site uses communications techniques which are widely adopted by brands and newspapers online (such as using infographics, bullet points and colourful designs to explain complicated topics) but rarely by official legal organisations: a Google search for 'human rights explained' or 'human rights guide' for example, currently brings up "a short introduction" from the Ministry of Justice which is over 40 pages long.

 

The site lacks a little polish in some areas (imagery on the blog isn't as strong as other sections), but it provides a much more engaging and shareable alternative to existing official resources. Some case studies feel particularly brief, but the site aims to offer a basic introduction to human rights rather than a comprehensive guide, and does link to more in-depth sources such as Human Rights Blog for readers who want to learn more. Content is written and checked by Wagner and a team of volunteers with legal training, ensuring it's concise but legally accurate.

 


As Wagner explains, the aim of the site is not only to provide a jargon-free and cheerful alternative to those set up by human rights charities (which often, understandably, focus on human rights abuses and failures to protect citizens) and visually uninspiring documents from official sources, but also to encourage people to share and talk about social issues online. The site's visually led approach is much more likely to appeal to younger audiences and its bitesize content and illustrations have been designed with Facebook feeds and Twitter profiles in mind.

While magazine and news websites often make great use of infographics, timelines and interactives when discussing complex issues, from global conflicts to election campaigns, there are few websites dedicated to explaining UK law or politics in a similarly visually engaging way. Wagner hopes RightsInfo might encourage similar projects to educate audiences about other areas of the law which are also often misunderstood, such as family or immigration law.

He also hopes to help educate voters about human rights ahead of the UK general election next month, and challenge some common misonceptions about the EU and human rights - for example, the idea that British values have been undermined by European judges.

It's a great example of how to present complex statutes, judgments and policies in a way that looks interesting and easy to understand - and, in the run up to the election, a method political parties should also be taking note of. There's been much criticism of Labour, Conservative and Lib Dem logos and posters, but their approach to online campaigning is equally outdated, and if Governments and parties really want to engage with voters online (particularly younger ones), perhaps they should adopt a similar approach to mainstream media and independent, impartial sites like RightsInfo.

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Sagmeister & Walsh and the robbery that never was http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/sagmeister-walsh-hoax-robbery http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/april/sagmeister-walsh-hoax-robbery#feedback Tue, 21 Apr 2015 17:44:00 +0000 Patrick Burgoyne http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=88675

There had been a robbery at Sagmeister & Walsh and it was all captured on camera. CR had the story. Except we didn't and there was no robbery. It was all an elaborate hoax

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There had been a robbery at the studio of Sagmeister & Walsh and it was all captured on camera. CR had the story. Except we didn't and there was no robbery. It was all an elaborate hoax

 

 

On Friday last week what appeared to be a page from the CR website carried a story on what appeared to be a robbery at the New York design studio Sagmeister & Walsh. The studio is well known for its home page which features a live webcam of the space. In the story, it looked as though the web cam had picked up some masked intruders removing various items from the space. Sagmeister & Walsh tweeted that "We are deeply saddened by this loss. Next time take the printer" with a link to the story.

 

 

Except that something was wrong. The URL on the story was not one of ours and was from the wrong domain. The ‘intruders' were suspiciously well-dressed.

In fact, the whole thing was a (very) elaborate hoax perpetrated by Barcelona-based creative studio achos. Once we'd calmed down, we spoke to them about how (and why) they did it.

"We've been huge admirers of the work of Sagmeister & Walsh since we were students," they say. "The idea for the ‘robbery' had been in our heads for a long time. We wanted to demonstrate that we're young, we're hungry, and we're coming to take the work that's currently going to the top agencies in the world. We thought going into their studio and stealing their work was a good declaration of our intentions. So we went into their studio and stole their work."

The stunt is part of a wider campaign by achos with the hashtag #creathieves, which they describe as "a concept that sums up our ways of thinking and doing. We are the generation of the future. There's no shortage of new and eager creative people coming out with new ideas, new things to talk about. Sooner or later, this younger generation will end up ‘stealing' the work, so to speak, of the industry giants of today. We collaborate with a platform called FIU that helps to give new and talented creatives an opportunity to showcase their work. #creathieves is a movement of all of these people who are new today, and who'll be giants of the sector tomorrow."

So, how did they create such a convincing looking video of the Sagmeister & Walsh studio? "We looked for a space with similar proportions to their studio, and then we began to reconstruct the scene of the crime," achos say. "We shot a video recreating a robbery and kept the best frames. With a bit of photo editing and a lot of patience, we'd managed to get into the studio of Sagmeister & Walsh without ever leaving our homes!"

And for our website? "We bought a similar and believable domain [ownership of which they have since transferred to CR], checked out the web's code, and copied the design. We studied some of your articles to stay loyal to the structure, chose the photos, redesigned the banners, and wrote our copy for the news." Te page even had working links to genuine CR stories on the real website.

"We'd like to ask you to please excuse us for stealing the blog, and to say how much we appreciate your understanding and for this interview. We knew we could rob Sagmeister & Walsh, but we couldn't have imagined that we would have an interview with CreativeReview, so thank you very much for that."

Were they worried about the reaction? "Yes and no. At times we even started to think that we could anger the people at Sagmeister & Walsh, or that you folks could take some kind of action against us for making a fake version of your web. But there was no maliciousness, and the idea was worth the risk."

 

"One of the things we were most worried (and also excited) about was giving the "Work" banner back to Jessica during the conference she was speaking at during Sitges Next, outside of Barcelona. It was two days since we had launched the article, and we were pretty nervous, didn't want to miss our opportunity. But we didn't know how she was going to react.

"Luckily, everything went well [see above, Jessica Walsh in centre]. We never got in contact with Sagmeister & Walsh beforehand or anything like that. We just decided to share the news on Facebook and Twitter, and they demonstrated a great sense of humor when they tweeted the link to our article. That really helped make the news more credible to people and media who followed this story. And Jessica ended up being amazing about the whole thing, bursting out laughing with us after she realized what we were handing her. She was wonderful. So from here we give them our thanks, and also thank you to everyone at (the real) Creative Review."

 

More on achos here

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