CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Tue, 30 Jun 2015 20:05:29 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 Provocative ad campaign to raise awareness of US hunger http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/provocative-new-campaign-to-raise-awareness-of-hunger-in-us http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/provocative-new-campaign-to-raise-awareness-of-hunger-in-us#feedback Tue, 30 Jun 2015 18:20:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91139

BBH New York has created a striking new ad campaign that aims to tackle the issue of hunger in the US. It uses a series of spoof PSAs where countries such as China, Slovenia and Germany – all of which have better statistics regarding access to food than the US – appear to be offering to help America with its problem...

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BBH New York has created a striking new ad campaign that aims to tackle the issue of hunger in the US. It uses a series of spoof PSAs where countries such as China, Slovenia and Germany – all of which have better statistics regarding access to food than the US – appear to be offering to help America with its problem...

The campaign promotes Great Nations Eat (greatnationseat.org), a movement that brings together non-profits, filmmakers, media companies and others to raise awareness about hunger and inequality in the US.

Released to coincide with the July 4th Independence Day holiday, the ads, shown below, rather puncture the pride with which America typically holds itself. The spots recreate the familiar charity ads that encourage Americans to donate money to starving children overseas but with the twist that the kids featured here are actually US citizens.

 

 

Alongside these films are a series of posters and less provocative infomercials that use appealing graphics and typography to grab attention instead:

 

 

 

More on Great Nations Eat is at greatnationseat.org.

Credits:
Agency: BBH New York
Creative chairman: John Patroulis
Chief creative officer: Ari Weiss
ECD: Gerard Caputo
Group creative director: Paul Kamzelas
Creatives: Amanda Brencys, Diego Fonseca, Laura Holmes, Brianna Lohr, Jackie Anzaldi, Kelly Diaz
Design: Bruno Borges, Crissy Fetcher
Director: Jeff Low
Post: The Mill

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New illustration: Wong Ping, Tom Cole, Owen Davey, Joe Morse, Jean Jullien & more http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/new-illustration-3006 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/new-illustration-3006#feedback Tue, 30 Jun 2015 10:42:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91133

Our latest pick of new illustration includes an animated campaign for Prada sunglasses, some large-scale murals for Fuller's beer, a beautifully illustrated book about monkeys by Owen Davey and a new edition of Toni Morrison's Beloved novel from The Folio Society.

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Our latest pick of new illustration includes an animated campaign for Prada sunglasses, some large-scale murals for Fuller's beer, a beautifully illustrated book about monkeys by Owen Davey and a new edition of Toni Morrison's Beloved novel from The Folio Society.

Prada Raw Avenue

Judith Van Den Hoek (above) and Wong Ping (top)

Production company Acne partnered with The Mill and Milan creative agency April to create Prada Raw Avenue, a charming animated digital campaign for Prada to promote the brand's new range of sunglasses.

Six illustrators (Carly Kuhn, Megan Hess, Blair Breitenstein, Judith Van Den Hoek, Wong Ping and Vilda Vega) were asked to create a series of scenes featuring Prada eyewear and clothing, with illustrations then made into short flip book-style animations.

The resulting films were posted on Instagram and the Prada Raw website, and feature a lovely mix of hand painted and digital artwork, from Ping's bright and surreal designs to Kuhn's more traditional pen and ink drawings.

Vilda Vega

Blair Breitenstein

Megan Hess

Vilda Vega

 

Owen Davey - Mad About Monkeys

Owen Davey's latest book, Mad About Monkeys, is a beautifully illustrated compendium of facts about the world's 250 species of monkey, from pygmy marmosets to Japanese macaques. The book contains information about various species' behaviour, traits and habitats alongside some striking geometric artwork, and Davey's cheerful illustrations perfectly capture's the animal's inquisitive personality.

Davey says the idea for the book came about after discussing new projects with publisher Nobrow, and later drawing a gelada monkey. "I had actually done a non-fiction book about monkeys and apes during my uni degree at Falmouth, so it seemed like a perfect fit," he says.

The book took around a year to produce, including six months to write and illustrate it, says Davey. "Writing a non-fiction book is a very labour intensive task. You can't make anything up. The research has to be truly solid."

For visual research, Davey studied photographs, films and footage found on the internet, but says his monkeys are a stylised interpretation of the species they're based on, rather than anatomically accurate depictions. "There are a couple of illustrations in the book which are to scale, so that meant that I had to get the sizes right and measured out correctly, but I tried not to get too bogged down in minute accuracy," he says.

"The illustrations are obviously stylised," he adds. "If a monkey's body had a vaguely circular element to it, I would make it completely circular. I would try to simplify angles and curves into more geometric alternatives. It was very much a case of me doing little character studies with each one I drew. I wasn't trying to completely replicate what the monkeys look like...I wanted there to be a sense of fun that reflects the humour often invoked by our primate pals."

Davey describes the project as "a dream book to illustrate" and says he has long been fascinated by the animal. "If you read the book, you'll quickly see why I find monkeys so fascinating - they are incredibly clever, wonderfully resourceful and undoubtedly human in many ways, which all help to tap into human curiosity," he says. "There is so much variety within them as a species, from sizes and shapes to colours and habitats."

 

Mad About Monkeys is published by Nobrow and costs £12.99. You can order a copy here.


Tal Brosh - Phytology

Bethnal Green Nature Reserve was once part of an idyllic 47 acre meadow in East London. Much of this green space was lost when the area was built on in the 19th century, and heavily bombed in World War Two, but since the 1990s, local residents have been working to transform the neglected patch of land into a peaceful medicinal field.

The Phytology field now contains over 30 species of plants which are believed to have health benefits, from St John's Wort to wild garlic and burdock. The site is open to the public each Saturday, and visitors are welcome to harvest plants and take them home.

To commemorate the area's history, the Phytology team installed a billboard in the space, and have been commissioning a series of illustrators to create artworks documenting its past. Over the past four months, illustrator and designer Tal Brosh has painted four images on the billboard. Each represents a different incarnation of the field, from a medieval meadow to a war torn bomb site, and each painting is layered over the previous. Brosh's work will be on show until July 4, and is also documented on the Phytology website.

 

Jean Jullien - Petit Appetit

Petit Appetit is a new exhibition of food-themed prints and sculptures by Jean Jullien, on show at Colette Paris until July 18. Created with food magazine Frictose, the exhibition includes some brilliantly witty artworks poking gentle fun at our relationship with food and drink, and the way we consume it.

Jullien has also designed a chair with furniture brand Olow for the exhibition, as well as a giant sculpture (shown below) with design collective Abois, and a range of chocolates, lollipops and ice-cream:

 

Tom Cole - Fuller's Frontier

Images via tomclohosycole.co.uk

Illustrator Tom Cole has created an eye-catching series of large-scale murals around East London to promote Frontier, a new craft lager for local brewery Fuller's.

The artwork is refreshingly free of the usual cliches found in summery booze ads, relying instead on some creative interpretations of the word flavour alongside some bold illustrations of the beer itself. Murals are installed on Great Eastern Street and Village Underground, and Cole's illustrations are also running on billboards and print ads.

 

Folio Society - Beloved

The Folio Society has released an illustrated edition of Toni Morrison's harrowing novel, Beloved, which features some poignant artwork by Joe Morse.

The book is inspired by the true story of Margaret Garner, an African-American woman who escaped slavery in Kentucky in the 1850s and fled to Ohio, but was pursued across state borders by slave owners. The story isn't presented in chronological order, but told through a mix of poems, flashbacks, nightmares and memories. It won a Pulitzer Prize in 1988, and was later made into a film starring Oprah Winfrey.

Morse's illustrations for the text are inspired by 19th century African-American tintype photographs, which he came across on an online auction site when researching imagery for the project. "The images were so vivid, and the subjects so alive that I spent days just building characters, drawing dresses and hands," he says. Artwork features shades of indigo (which Morse often uses as a base colour) throughout, and were created in watercolour then coloured in digitally. "I wanted an atmospheric feel in these images that captured a sense of depth and space," he explains.

 

Illustrations by Joe Morse from The Folio Society edition of Beloved © Joe Morse2015

Before being commissioned to illustrate the book, Morse was asked to submit a trial artwork for Morrison's approval, based on a scene from the first 30 pages of the text. "I had to submit a rough and the excerpt from the book, [so] I just went ahead and painted the image as I felt that would be the best way to get my idea across, which I of course second-guessed, and did a new image as a linear rough that was much more graphic and submitted that.

"Art Director Sheri Gee then emailed me back and suggested seeing more of the characters and giving us more of the relationship ... she basically was describing the painting I had first executed. I sent my original piece in and 2 weeks later, Toni Morrison approved me to do the book. Now the brief began, and the emphasis was to be on ‘the novel's rich imagery and ambiguity and to reflect [its] more gothic and supernatural elements," he says.

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Illustration by Joe Morse from The Folio Society edition of Beloved © Joe Morse2015

Illustrating a text that addresses such difficult subject matter (the book deals with death, rape and brutality as well as oppression and racism), and one that isn't presented in a linear format, is a challenging task. Morse says he was keen to produce images which were relevant to the novel, and would provide another way into Morrison's text, rather than acting as page decoration. "They needed a logic and reason to be there," he says.

"In a book that is so rich in visual images it is easy to get lost in the abundance of material to draw from. I wrote a list at first of scenes to work from and it became ridiculously long and useless," he adds. "I then looked at how Toni Morrison used memory or how Sethe (the novel's protagonist) described rememory - memories that never die, a past you can't escape. The idea of connecting images across characters and linking the past with the present informed my choices. I focused on precipitating events, moments in the book that change the characters," he adds.

Illustration by Joe Morse from The Folio Society edition of Beloved © Joe Morse2015

The title is the latest in a series of Folio Society editions featuring some beautiful and imaginative artwork, from Ben Jones' beautiful work for A Clockwork Orange to Tatsuro Kiuchi's illustrations for Day of the Jackyll. Styles range from painterly to graphic and abstract, spaning a range of mediums. Gee says she looks for artists who demonstrate "great draughtsmanship, usually coupled with noticeable mark-making or texture."

"I like traces of tradional media in the work I commission, though that doesn't work for everything obviously. Alongside strong draughtsmanship, being able to draw or paint a convincing narrative scene, with equally convincing characters, is quite a skill, which goes beyond just observational sketching. It's about being able to add character, tension, mood etc to a scene, which is so important for our commissions, regardless of medium or style," she adds.

Beloved is out now and costs £39.95. You can order copies at foliosociety.com

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A6 Notebook http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/a6-notebook http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/a6-notebook#feedback Mon, 29 Jun 2015 18:03:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91118

A6 is a measurement of paper size. The A6 is a road which runs for over 300 miles from Luton to Carlisle in England. Creative partnership Asbury & Asbury has brought the two together in the form of a notebook, its first product in a new series of items dedicated to the British A-roads...

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A6 is a measurement of paper size. The A6 is a road which runs for over 300 miles from Luton to Carlisle in England. Creative partnership Asbury & Asbury has brought the two together in the form of a notebook, its first product in a new series of items dedicated to the British A-roads...

From The Canterbury Tales to Jack Kerouac and Will Self's musings on the British motorway, travelling by road is closely linked to creativity and inspiration.

But Britain's A-roads have perhaps been rather overlooked in this regard, supplanted from their position as the country's main arterial links when the high-speed motorways came along. The very first A-roads – A1 through to A6 – radiated out of London (in a clockwise direction), while the A7 to A9 spun out from Edinburgh.

In his foreword to the A6 Notebook, the significance – and mystery – of this particular A-road is addressed by social historian, Joe Moran. "A-roads serve as the road system's unconscious," he writes, "often stretching for miles without being signposted or acknowledged, disappearing into street names and getting caught up in one-way systems but still always there, connecting up different areas of our lives serendipitously."

The notebook itself is blank (as you'd expect) but there are footnotes on each page marking various A6 destinations and points of interest (two shown, below). The studio has also included an introductory essay on the road, while the notebook's cover features an image from a journey made on a lovely stretch near Dove Holes in the Peak District.

 

Starting out in Luton, the A6 goes through Bedford, Leicester, Loughborough, Derby and Matlock and on to Bakewell, Buxton, Stockport, Manchester, Salford, Bolton, Chorley, Preston and Lancaster, before moving through Kendal and Penrith and finally to Carlisle. Along the way it is known by more than 60 different names.

Since first conceiving of the idea of pairing a suitably-sized notebook with its matching single-digit A-road eight years ago, Asbury & Asbury have been taking photographs of six roads – the A3, A4, A5, A6, A7 and A8 – while on trips away (a mock up of what the full series might look like is shown above).

The studio plans to tackle the A5 next – the 181 miles from Marble Arch in London to the Port of Holyhead in Wales.

The A6 Notebook will ship from July 1 and is available to order for £11 (plus P&P) from asburyandasbury.tictail.com.

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Vans x Murakami http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/vansxmurakami http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/vansxmurakami#feedback Mon, 29 Jun 2015 14:49:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91109

Vans has collaborated with artist Takashi Murakami on a range of t-shirts, skate decks, surf boards and shoes for its premium Vault by Vans label. We spoke to Vans' VP of merchandising and design, Steve Mills, about the partnership, and how collaborating with artists and fashion labels has helped transform perceptions of its classic shoes.

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Vans has collaborated with artist Takashi Murakami on a range of t-shirts, skate decks, surf boards and shoes for its premium Vault by Vans label. We spoke to Vans' VP of merchandising and design, Steve Mills, about the partnership, and how collaborating with artists and fashion labels has helped transform perceptions of its classic shoes.

On a sunny afternoon in Paris last weekend, Takashi Murakami, dressed in a magnificent skull-shaped hat, unveiled a new range of clothing and footwear for US brand Vans. T-shirts, shoes, surfboards and skate decks in his colourful floral and skull prints went on sale in 40 stores around the world on Saturday morning, and most were sold out of their stock within a couple of hours.

The collection is the latest in a long list of commercial partnerships from Murakami. He has applied his superflat designs to everything from Citizen watches and Issey Mayake clothing to a vast (and hugely successful) range of products for Louis Vuitton. As well as hosting solo exhibitions in some of the world's most prestigious galleries, and making art that sells for seven-figure sums, he creates toys and merchandise for almost every price point at his Kaikai Kiki factory, which now employs over 100 people. He has also worked on an animated music video with Pharrell Williams, album art for Kanye West and an animated feature film, Jellyfish Eyes, released in 2013.

Murakami's collaboration with Vans came about when he expressed a desire to work with the brand in an interview with Vanity Fair (he says has worn its canvas slip-ons every day for 15 years, and is fascinated by skating and surfing). After reading the article, Vans' VP of global design and merchandising, Steve Mills, flew to Japan to visit him, and the pair started working on the product line 18 months ago. "I've been a fan of Takashi since the mid 1990s. We had had conversations about working with him before, but for some reason, it had never come to fruition," says Mills.

The collection is one of a series of collaborations between Vans and contemporary artists through its Vault imprint, launched in 2003. As Mills explained to CR at the Paris launch event, the premium label was set up to help boost sales of its classics range and compete with limited edition collections from the likes of Nike and Adidas ("we wanted to come at it from a surf and skating angle," he said), but has since taken on a life of its own.

The project started out small, with lines sold at a few "hand-picked" retailers, but is now stocked in 40 outlets from California skate stores to branches of Dover Street Market, Barney's and Opening Ceremony. Past collections include collaborations with Kenzo and Simpsons artist Matt Groening, as well as street artist Ron English, and ranges featuring Star Wars, Peanuts and Disney prints.

"At the time we launched Vault, it was difficult convincing people to love Vans, and that we could compete in the upper echelons of the expensive sneaker business. We were known for $45, $50 canvas and suede shoes," Mills explains.

"When we first wrote the business plan for this, it was more about kick-starting our classics business, because at the time, we couldn't give them away," he adds. "It was really to get people saying, "Oh I remember that shoe", and go back to buying what they grew up with as kids, and now, what was started to help get that business going has become its own little animal."

Recruiting a mix of fashion designers, fine artists, street artists and franchises with a cult following has been key to the project's success, and Mills says the brand is selective about who it works with. "We turn down a lot of people, because it just doesn't make sense for us to do projects with them," he says. "It's not that we don't respect them, but it needs to be a right fit, and they need to get us as a brand. We've always been successful following our gut I think, and we try to find people that are like us. It sounds weird but we're a bunch of skaters and surfers and musicians and artists and we tend to associate with those kind of people," he says.

The list of collaborators is diverse, but all have a cult following, and many are closely linked with the skate culture aesthetic. Mills says artists and designers are left largely to their own devices when creating a line for Vault, with no creative restrictions placed on their designs.

"There are occasions where you'll try to steer people in a direction but for the most part, the way I work is, 'I'm working with you because I want you to do what you want to do. Not what I think you should do'. So we try to give them creative freedom without any limitations," Mills explains. "There are times when we might have to reign it back - I guess you might call it a social responsibility - but we try not to let that get in the way, and I can't recall when we've ever really told somebody they can't do something. It's pretty much 'If we're working with you, it's your project, and we're really just the canvas'".

"It's great that we have the latitude to be able to work with brands, musicians, pop culture and fine art, so it makes [the project] kind of limitless," he adds. "When we talked to Takashi, we initially talked about maybe doing another project and he showed me some stuff that he'd done on his own for it, so we might work with him again, but we've got to stagger it. We won't do it every season, because it takes the special-ness out of it," adds Mills.

In the decade since its launch, Mills says Vault has had a significant impact on the business, helping elevate Vans' classic shoes from skater's staples to items stocked in luxury boutiques. The range has also gone from a side project to one of the brand's most talked about collections.

"Vault did what it was supposed to do, and now we're trying to expand that in to its own little thing to really promote the brand. It's much more project-based, and aspirational, and it's allowed us to do a lot of stuff that we couldn't do elsewhere," says Mills.

Alongside super limited edition collaborations, new and alternative versions of its classic shoes are also sold exclusively through Vault retailers in larger but still limited runs. "These projects [like the Murakami range] are limited, so the stores don't make a lot of money off of them, and they sell out fast, so we want to give them something they can have exclusively but in bigger volumes to keep the business going," he explains. "The whole category has evolved over the last 10 years, and where it was once a line, 90 percent is now trying to do 3 or 4 collaborations a season, and producing what we call classic originals for the Vault."

Compared to its mass-produced lines, Vans' Vault range doesn’t make much money, but with fans camping overnight to get their hands on a pair of Murakami’s slip-ons, and coverage in high-end fashion titles, the value of collections like VansxMurakami extends way beyond their price tags. By collaborating with a carefully selected mix of high-end designers, iconic entertainment brands and contemporary artists, the brand has turned a struggling product into a hard-to-get item - and helped introduce a whole new audience to some of its oldest designs.

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Cannes Lions 2015: The winners and some reflections http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/cannes-lions-2015-the-winners-and-some-reflections http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/cannes-lions-2015-the-winners-and-some-reflections#feedback Sun, 28 Jun 2015 10:05:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91093

Well it's all over for Cannes Lions for another year. The juries have deliberated, an unspeakable amount of rosé has been drunk, and it's time to round up the major winners. Brace yourself, there are a lot...

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Well it's all over for Cannes Lions for another year. The juries have deliberated, an unspeakable amount of rosé has been drunk, and it's time to round up the major winners. Brace yourself, there are a lot...

Cannes had an exhausting number of categories this year so we're sticking to just the Grand Prix gongs here. If you want to find out who picked up the Golds, Silvers and Bronzes – and there is some great work honoured there – visit canneslions.com.

Right then, here we go:

 

Grand Prix Film: Geico, Unskippable: Family; The Martin Agency

 

Grand Prix Film: Leica, 100; F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi

 


Grand Prix Titanium: Domino's Pizza, Emoji Ordering; Crispin Porter & Bogusky

 

Grand Prix Integrated: Jordan, Re2pect; Wieden + Kennedy New York

 

Grand Prix Film Craft: John Lewis, Monty The Penguin; Adam&EveDDB

 

Grand Prix Innovation: What3Words

 

Grand Prix Cyber: Under Armour, I Will What I Want; Droga5 New York

 

Grand Prix Radio: Soundcloud, The Berlin Wall of Sound; Grey Berlin

 

Grand Prix Product Design: Lucky Iron Fish Project

 

Grand Prix Design and Grand Prix Promo & Activation: Volvo, LifePaint; Grey London

 

Grand Prix PR: Always, Like A Girl; Leo Burnett

 

Grand Prix Creative Effectiveness: Volvo Trucks, Epic Split; Forsman & Bodenfors

 

Grand Prix Media: Vodafone, Red Light Application; Y&R Istanbul

 

Grand Prix Glass: P&G Whisper, Touch the Pickle; BBDO India

 

Grand Prix Outdoor: Apple, Shot on iPhone6; TBWA Media Arts Lab

 

Grand Prix Direct: Volvo, The Greatest Interception Ever; Grey New York

 

Grand Prix Mobile: Google Cardboard

 

Grand Prix Press: Buenos Aires Public Bike System, Never Stop Riding; The Community

 

Grand Prix Health: Astrazeneca, Take It From A Fish; DigitasLBi

 

Grand Prix Health: Sport England, This Girl Can; FCB Inferno

 

Grand Prix Health: Always, Intimate Words; Leo Burnett Mexico

 

Grand Prix for Good: ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

 

There were no Grand Prix gongs awarded in either the Branded Content & Entertainment or Creative Data categories.

Despite this year's Cannes Lions having a record number of categories and gongs, oddly the crowds at the festival seemed less preoccupied than usual with what was going to win.

Perhaps it was because there were no sure fire winners this year, no Epic Splits. Perhaps it was because of category confusion: for while there may be more than ever, there remains endless debate about what fits where, and even exactly what some awards are meant to be recognising.

Perhaps it was because some of those projects that did pick up the major gongs proved controversial (especially in Product Design, where the agency that entered the Grand Prix-winning work, Geometry Global Dubai, has had its name removed from the award after complaints broke out online over its involvement in the project), so negative talk dominated.

Perhaps it was because it's more fun to talk about the various celebrities that attended the festival or share stories about the pains of just getting to Cannes during the French taxi strike. The plucky duo who were caught 'expressing their love' on the red carpet late at night was also a popular conversational diversion.

Who knows.

What is clear is that the festival is more vital and vibrant then ever, and it feels increasingly essential to attend, as, well, everyone else seems to be there. Whether the awards are as big a part of the draw as they once were is open to question but they remain the backbone to the festival, and the winners this year reflect an industry that is diverse and interesting, even after the quibbles over some of the awardees are put aside.

But if you're tired of the ever-expanding list of awards, I severely doubt we've reached the peak yet – in fact, the way things are going, Cannes Lions will soon stretch even further into a second week, a development that most of our livers surely cannot take.

canneslions.com

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Zio Ziegler mural marks 70th anniversary of UN charter http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/zio-ziegler-un-mural-oakland http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/zio-ziegler-un-mural-oakland#feedback Fri, 26 Jun 2015 15:05:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91069

Artist Zio Ziegler has created a vast new mural in Oakland, California to mark the 70th anniversary of the United Nations Charter, which was signed in San Francisco 70 years ago today.

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Images by Sorell Tsui, courtesy of UN Dispatch

Artist Zio Ziegler has painted a 135-foot mural in Oakland, California to mark the 70th anniversary of the United Nations Charter, which was signed in the state 70 years ago today.

Ziegler spent three days painting the mural, which covers one side of the 26-storey, flatiron-shaped Cathedral building in the West Coast port city. The artwork is designed to reflect the ideals of the UN and its 17 sustainable development goals, a set of global targets that will inform its policies over the next 15 years. (Goals include eradicating poverty, ensuring gender equality and making education available to all, and are an extension of the organisation's millennium development goals set out in 2000).

In an interview with UN Dispatch, Ziegler said he wanted the artwork to be "pan cultural", addressing people of every nationality. The image, which depicts a woman sitting on a chair and holding a dove, is painted in colourful patterns inspired by folk art and imagery from around the world.

"I wanted to address all these different cultures; and to address people, prosperity and planet...clean water, justice and housing for all. But how do I address that in one simple image? What I kept coming back to is the clothing of the figure being a composite of all different patterns from tonnes of different countries and skin tones of every ethnicity," he says.

The varying skin tones in the woman's face also represent the idea of global identity and a shared responsibility, says Ziegler, who describes the figure as "a mother earth figure, which is a composite of all its children." The image features four doves, and Ziegler says he was particularly inspired by Picasso's 1949 work, Dove of Peace, when working on the mural. "For me, the most iconic image of the UN is the Picasso dove. It has a simplicity and elegance to it that is so strong," he adds.

Ziegler has created several large-scale murals around San Francisco as well as large-scale artworks for Google and Facebook, which feature similarly intricate patterns. He also designed a clothing and shoe collection for Vans, and is holding an exhibition of his fine art work at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles this weekend until July 20.

The mural was completed earlier this month, but will be officially launched at a ceremony in Oakland this afternoon. California company Bazooka Mama Productions has put together a timelapse of the mural being painted, which you can watch below. It's a striking artwork, and a powerful reminder of the UN's ideals of peace, inclusivity and equality.

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Saatchi & Saatchi New Directors' Showcase Turns 25 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/saatchi-saatchi-new-directors-showcase-turns-25 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/saatchi-saatchi-new-directors-showcase-turns-25#feedback Thu, 25 Jun 2015 16:25:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=90906

The Saatchi & Saatchi New Directors' Showcase is something of an institution at the Cannes Lions festival, and this year it celebrates a big birthday – 25 years. In honour of reaching such a grand age, the agency invited 25 of its most famous alumni to create a special new film, which was shown for the first time at the festival this morning...

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The Saatchi & Saatchi New Directors' Showcase is something of an institution at the Cannes Lions festival, and this year it celebrates a big birthday – 25 years. In honour of reaching such a grand age, the agency invited 25 of its most famous alumni to create a special new film, which was shown for the first time at the festival this morning...

The role of film in advertising has been the source of much debate over the last two-and-a-half decades. Once viewed as essential for any big brand to make its mark, the TV ad lost some of its power with the rise of internet, and for a while it was predicted to disappear altogether. But as sites such as YouTube demonstrate, where TV ads are often among the most-watched films, the medium still has a vital role to play in helping brands communicate.

While the pundits debate the deeper significance of the TV spot, Saatchi & Saatchi has stuck to its task of offering up the best new directing stars year after year to the audience at Cannes Lions. And as the names involved in the 25-minute film which premiered today show – which range from Michel Gondry to Daniel Kleinman, Dawn Shadforth to Jonathan Glazer – the agency certainly knows how to pick the top talent.

For the event the 25 directors created an 'exquisite corpse' film where each created a minute-long work. They were given two rules: their short had to end with a prop from the original film they had featured in the showcase and it had to start with the preceding director's prop. The resulting 25-minute long film was at times bizarre, at times brilliantly funny and often mused on the nature of being a director.

Sadly I can't share it with you here as apparently today's screening is the only time it will ever air. However, what I can show you is work from the latest crop of new directors. Here is the class of 2015:

 

Pup, Guilt Trip, by Chandler Levack & Jeremy Schaulin-Rioux

 

Hotel 22 by Elizabeth Lo


Tiga, Bugatti by Helmi; Production company: Division Paris

 

as-phyx-i-a by Maria Takeuchi & Frederico Phillips

 

Garage by Yvan Fabing; Production company: Matter Productions

 

Flying Lotus, Coronus, The Terminator by Young Replicant (Alex Takacs); Production company: Pulse Films


The Gunfighter by Eric Kissack; Production company: Helo

 

DyE, She's Bad by Dent de Cuir; Production company: Excuse My French

 

Klangkarussell, Netzwerk (Falls Like Rain) by Charlie Robins; Production company: Forever Pictures

 

Siska, Unconditional Rebel by Guillaume Panariello; Production company: La Planète Rouge

 

The Bug, Function/Void by Factory Fifteen

 


JohnnyExpress by Kyungmin Woo; Production company: Alfred ImageWorks

 

A$AP Rocky, L$D by Dexter Navy; Production company: Partizan

 

Denali by Ben Knight; Production company: Felt Soul Media

 

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CR July: The Live issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/cr-july-live-issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/cr-july-live-issue#feedback Thu, 25 Jun 2015 10:14:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91029

CR July is dedicated to innovation in live experiences with features on theatre, virtual reality, live streaming apps and the revitalisation of a great British seaside amusement park. Plus we have interviews with Tamara Rojo, the artistic director of the English National Ballet, and the Glastonbury Festival's Emily Eavis...

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CR July is dedicated to innovation in live experiences with features on theatre, virtual reality, live streaming apps and the revitalisation of a great British seaside amusement park. Plus we have interviews with Tamara Rojo, the artistic director of the English National Ballet, and the Glastonbury Festival's Emily Eavis...

What can a ballet dancer teach a designer? Or an art director? When we started these themed issues of CR at the start of the year, we wanted to illustrate that creative people, in whatever discipline, face similar challenges.

Our interview with Rojo is a good example of what we had in mind. As ENB's artistic director she is responsible not just for what happens on stage but also for the whole ENB ‘brand'. Taking risks, trusting her creative team, shifting perceptions and encouraging collaborations with cutting edge talent – Rojo has faced all these issues.

And collaboration is at the heart of the majority of the creative endeavours featured in our special issue – just look at Glastonbury. Each year, a team of thousands work together, with no overall creative director, to transform Worthy Farm into the world's pre-eminent performing arts festival – and an unforgettable live experience.

The best way to ensure you never miss an issue of CR is to subscribe and save up to 30% off the cover price. All our subscribers can also take advantage of our CR Club offers, which are listed here. Full details on how to subscribe are here.


Opening the issue, in Month in Review we look at the recent trend for brands to instruct on good parenting skills; the latest Gordon Young/Why Not Associates artwork; and what it's like to be a young, female, Muslim designer.

In his Logo Log column, Michael Evamy looks at identities created for sporting stars and their brands; while Daniel Benneworth Gray investigates the design possibilities that can result from hitting yourself in the face. Antonia Wilson also attends a Bombass + Parr immersive dining experience for Sony.

Opening our live experiences section, Rachael Steven takes an in-depth look at how TBWA\London's floating house for Airbnb was put together.


William Fowler argues that Virtual Reality offers more than just hype after hearing from some of Hollywood's top innovators.

 

Mark Sinclair looks at how Periscope and other live streaming services are transforming media, journalism and entertainment.

 

Compared to the great World's Fairs of the 1960s, today's brand pavilions are vapid and empty – Oliver Wainwright considers how they went from wonder to 'whatever'.

 

Eliza Williams talks to artist John Walter to find out about his latest ‘maximalist art experience'...

 

... while also taking a behind-the-scenes look at plans to revive the Dreamland theme park in Margate.

 

 

And in her interview with Tamara Rojo, Williams also finds out how the English National Ballet's artistic director is shaking up the world of dance. (Rojo is also our cover star this month – photographed by Rick Guest.)

 

In an in-depth feature, Emily Eavis talks Antonia Wilson through the creative process behind the staging of the Glastonbury Festival.

 

And Rachael Steven meets Headlong, the theatre company producing some of the most vivid and memorable live experiences around.

 



In Crit, Sarah Snaith visits a new Dutch exhibition that examines both sides of design under occupation ...

 

... and Rick Poynor reviews an unmissable survey of Chinese photobooks.

The best way to ensure you never miss an issue of CR is to subscribe and save up to 30% off the cover price. All our subscribers can also take advantage of our CR Club offers, which are listed here. Full details on how to subscribe are here.

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Because the internet: MTV launches GIF and meme-inspired visual identity http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/mtv http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/mtv#feedback Thu, 25 Jun 2015 09:00:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91016

MTV has launched a brilliantly bonkers new on-air identity today, featuring idents inspired by internet memes, GIFs and emojis, and social media videos posted by viewers. We spoke to the channel's VP of creative and marketing Sean Saylor about the refresh, and how MTV hopes to reclaim its reputation for discovering new artistic talent.]]>

MTV has launched a brilliantly bonkers new on-air identity today, featuring idents inspired by internet memes, GIFs and emojis, and social media videos posted by viewers. We spoke to the channel's VP of creative and marketing Sean Saylor about the refresh, and how MTV hopes to reclaim its reputation for discovering new artistic talent.

When MTV launched in 1981, there was nothing like it. A 24-hour music channel was unheard of, and its impact on the entertainment industry was huge. As well as driving innovation in music videos, it helped launch the careers of some of the 80s and 90s biggest artists and filmmakers, and its animated series and reality shows like Beavis and Butthead and the Real World paved the way for new genres of television.

Thirty-four years later, however, MTV is facing tough competition. It's now broadcast in over 160 countries to half a billion households, but it has to contend with dozens of music and teen channels, as well as online platforms where artists and amateurs can create and share content in an instant. For a channel founded on providing innovative content and discovering the next big thing, keeping pace with the immediacy of the internet is perhaps its biggest challenge.

MTV has invested heavily in online content of late. It has several news sites and YouTube channels, and multiple accounts on Facebook, twitter and Instagram (its US Facebook page alone has over 46 million likes). It has also been experimenting with animated idents created in response to trending topics on social media through its Always On project, led by SVP of visual storytelling Richard Turley and his creative team in New York.

The project was named Best in Book in our annual this year, and provided a brilliant example of how to integrate online content into programming. Idents combined lo-fi graphics with user-generated content, and some weird and wonderful footage from around the web.

Today, MTV launched a new on-air identity with a similar 'new ugly' aesthetic, which it hopes will reflect the increasingly visual way its audience communicates. Graphics are a chaotic mix of clashing colours, unicorns, anthropomorphic fruit and badly animated humans, and perfectly capture MTV's playful tone of voice, as well as the DIY aesthetic of the internet.

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Alongside the new idents, the channel will be airing social media videos and content created by viewers in between shows. Working with B-Reel, it has developed a CMS to curate footage uploaded to social platforms using the hashtag MTVBump. Videos will be filtered for topicality, popularity and relevance, and broadcast online within a couple of hours. Next month, it will launch MTV Canvas, which it describes as a 'digital sticker book' allowing viewers to create their own branded idents using a suite of images and audio clips.

In an attempt to rekindle its reputation for discovering new creative talent - the channel helped launch the careers of Michel Gondry, Spike Jonez and Doug Aitken, among others - MTV is also reviving its art break programme; and has commissioned short video content from Thomas De Rijk, Katie Torn, Johnny Woods, Device, Eva Papamargariti and The Great Nordic Sword Fights. New videos will be added on a regular basis.

Sean Saylor, VP of creative and marketing at MTV, says the brand refresh is designed to be more in keeping with the visual language of the internet and the emojis, memes and GIFs its viewers use to communicate. "We go through rebrands every couple of years, and want to make sure we're in line with how our audience is communicating and talking. One of the things we saw was a huge change in the way our audience is consuming and producing content in the last couple of years, and the fact that they have become very visual in the way they communicate. They're making images to respond to comments, emojis have really blown up, so we wanted to take that and apply it to the brand," he explains.

Visuals were inspired by popular content posted by its audience online, as well as the look and feel established by Turley's team in Always On. "The stuff that Richard is doing is amazing. When we saw it, we thought that's great - now how de we have this playfulness in the brand at a global scale?" he explains.

At a four-day meeting in New York, Saylor, MTV creative director Nacho Gil and the channel's heads of marketing and social media pitched their concept for the new visual identity. They then met with the channel's global creative teams in Miami to discuss how the look would work in different regions.

"The majority of the visual direction was already set, but we had a session to work out how it could be managed on a regional scale, and to decide what things worked and what things might look old. Things might be trending in Asia a couple of years before Europe and America," Saylor explains.

While creating an identity so tied to visual trends is usually a recipe for disaster, Saylor says graphic elements will be udpated regularly in response to its audience's changing tastes. "One of the interesting things [the team had to think about when rebranding] was 'how can we make sure that we rebrand the channel, but in a way that we can refresh it constantly, so we're not stuck to a certain look and feel that will look old in six months?'"

"Instead of sending out traditional elements to be applied across all the different regions, which would take a lot of work to update, we had to look at it completely differently. We have created a structure of elements - there are 300 different backgrounds, hundreds of animations and our own emojis...and regions can mix them up and create their own pieces, but they'll always feel like they're coming from the same place." he says.

MTV Futura is still the channel's primary typeface, but Saylor says creative teams will be able to use different fonts and imagery for different shows. The extensive visual toolkit and user-generated content will give each region the freedom to create a unique 'local' voice, he says, without straying too far from the look and feel of sister channels abroad, and ndividual graphics will be updated on a regular basis to reflect changing visual trends.

"The style guide is more of a toolbox, that talks about a philosophy and approach without necessarily specifying where things should be placed. We've really made it a lot easier for the regions to play around more with the elements, and at the same time, we're able to refresh it every few months," he explains. "The rebrand will last until the end of the year, and at that point, we might say OK, what do we do next year? Our audience moves quickly, and we need to be ahead of that," he says.

While the channel has kept its iconic logo, which was last updated in 2010, a 3D version has finally been created for idents and video clips. "When we looked at the history of art breaks, a lot of artists were doing 3D versions of the logo, and many of our creative teams are creating communications and branding in 3D, so we wanted to make sure the logo exists in a 3D format that is modelled and can't be reshaped. Artists can [add a] skin or fill it, but they can't change the shape, so it's another way of giving people more options while retaining some consistency," explains Saylor.

This was more challenging than it sounds, however, as the 3D effect in MTV's 2D logo is impossible to create in 3D. "It's a fake perspective, so when you look at it in 3D from the front, you can't see that same perspective," he says. The solution was to create a flat M, with a 3D 'T' and 'V' popping out in front "to add character".

The art breaks released so far feature some surreal and funny content, and Saylor says he hopes the feature will introduce viewers to exciting new creative talent, helping emerging artists reach a wider audience, and helping restore MTV's reputation as the place to find innovative content.

"We're really looking at visual art but in later phases, we want to look at just talent in general - people doing interesting things on Vine or Instagram. They can come to our brand, and we'll expose them to a larger audience," he says. "On the visual front, one of the things we did was explore people doing something that feels new, fresh, and different to most things we've seen, and that aren't huge - we don't just want to go for the people working for multiple brands."

While MTV has perhaps become more known for its celebrity documentaries and reality shows like Teen Mom, Saylor says the channel is keen to balance this with more experimental content. "We want to find people doing amazing things, and say look at these artists creating amazing stuff," he adds.

Seven artists have created art breaks so far, but Saylor says the channel will expand the programme to showcase work from creatives around the world - and content will be carefully curated by its creative teams.

"It's not about just sending an open brief to thousands of artists and seeing who sends stuff in. We want different regions to go through the same curatorial process. When it comes to visual art, it's really a curation process...we want to be like no other brand out there. There are a lot of platforms that have a tonne of stuff - you can find whatever you want on YouTube - but we want to be the first to bring you new and interesting things," he says.

To anyone who favours a more minimal visual approach, MTV's new look will likely prove controversial. But the rebrand is exactly what the channel set out to create: it's bold, different, and much more in keeping with the kind of content teens are making and sharing online. MTV may not be the cultural phenomenon it once was, but it certainly hasn't lost its attitude.

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Elastic's double exposure titles for True Detective season 2 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/true-detective-season-2-title-sequence-elastic http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/june/true-detective-season-2-title-sequence-elastic#feedback Tue, 23 Jun 2015 15:08:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=90957

HBO crime drama True Detective is back for a second series, with an all new cast and another great double exposure title sequence by US studio Elastic.

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HBO crime drama True Detective is back for a second series, with an all new cast and another great double exposure title sequence by US studio Elastic and production partner Antibody.

The show's first season, starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, followed two detectives hunting a serial killer in rural Louisiana in the 1990s. The series was a huge success, winning a BAFTA and a Writers' Guild Award as well as Emmys for casting, directing and Adam Arkapaw's brilliant cinematography (the whole series was shot on Kodak film, save for a memorable six-minute tracking shot).

It also received an Emmy for Outstanding Title Design: created by Elastic and Antibody, the show's lavish opening sequence paired images of lead actors with bleak shots of industrial estates, desolate swamplands and abandoned playgrounds.

As creative director Patrick Clair explained in an interview with Art of the Title, the sequence used double exposure to portray the idea of characters being shaped by their surroundings and struggling with internal conflicts.

Titles were inspired by the work of photographer Richard Misrach, and made using digitally slowed footage from rushes to create a surreal and dream-like effect. The muted colours and ominous soundtrack (it's set to Handsome Family's 2003 song, Far From Any Road) perfectly captured the eeriness of the show and its setting.

The opening sequence for series two, which aired last night, uses the same double exposure effect but features new imagery and a chilling new soundtrack from Leonard Cohen.

The saturated colours have been replaced with bold reds and blues, and swamplands with bleached cityscapes and sunny California desert (the new series is set in a fictional Californian city, and stars Vince Vaughn, Rachel McAdams and Colin Farrell).

It's a long sequence - at 90 seconds, it's bound to annoy some viewers as the show goes on - but it's beautifully made, and Elastic have done a brilliant job of creating an entirely new look for the series, while retaining many of the same visual effects from season one.

The landscape isn't quite as eery, but the shots of forest scenes and dark roads, coupled with the blood red used throughout, create an equally unsettling effect. Episode one has so far received mixed reviews, but the new titles don't disappoint, and it's great to see such a cinematic approach to opening credits on TV.

True Detective is aired on Sunday nights on HBO in the US, and on Mondays on Sky Atlantic in the UK.

Credits

Design Studio: Elastic

Creative Director: Patrick Clair

Lead Animation and Compositing: Raoul Marks

Design: Patrick Clair, Paul Kim, Kevin Heo, Jeff Han

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