CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:18:42 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 Guardian Eyewitness exhibition at Foyles in London http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/guardian-eyewitness-exhibition-at-foyles http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/guardian-eyewitness-exhibition-at-foyles#feedback Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:48:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80611

Opening next week at the flagship Foyles bookstore on Charing Cross Road in London is an exhibition of photographs by David Levene that have appeared in the Guardian Eyewitness series. A selection of the images are shown here, and we talk to Roger Tooth, head of photography at the Guardian, about what makes a good Eyewitness image...

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Szechenyi Baths, Budapest, 2006

Opening next week at the flagship Foyles bookstore on Charing Cross Road in London is an exhibition of photographs by David Levene that have appeared in the Guardian Eyewitness series. A selection of the images are shown here, and we talk to Roger Tooth, head of photography at the Guardian, about what makes a good Eyewitness image...

The Eyewitness series has appeared as a double-page spread in the centre of the Guardian since 2005, when the newspaper introduced its Berliner format. Levene has produced images for it from the start and has had over 120 photos featured in the slot, which appears daily. For the exhibition at Foyles he has picked his ten favourites – each will be reproduced in large format in the space, at over 1.5 metres across.

WSOP, Las Vegas, 2007

Boca La Caja, Panama City, 2008

According to Tooth, the Eyewitness spread was initially due to appear only three days a week, but when the team saw the impact of producing photography at such a large scale, they decided to run it daily. "The ideal Eyewitness picture has to be strong visually and the subject must justify the treatment," Tooth continues. "It needs to have a lot of detail to retain and reward the viewer's interest. It works well when the majority of, or all the image is in focus: large, out-of-focus areas seem ugly when scaled-up. Quite a challenge for the Guardian's picture editors."

Bathing, Varanasi, 2007

Slipstream, Heathrow, 2014

The image that will appear in the slot is decided on the day, with the picture editors presenting options to the duty editor at midday. "Sometimes we have planned something, but as often as not it's a picture that has been shot by us or submitted to us on the day," says Tooth.

"We try to change the mood of the image each day," he continues. "A hard news image one day might be followed by an arts subject the next. The large picture agencies send us a tremendous variety of subjects, some of the most beautiful are often those 'slice of life' images documenting the daily lives of people from around the world. Like David's image from Varanasi (above). Always popular are images from the natural world: we've published some memorable polar bears and elephants."

Ballerinas, London, 2008

Kibera, Nairobi, 2006

"Nothing is off-limits subject-wise," continues Tooth, "although in these days of grim news and very serious papers with the content reflecting events, we sometimes use the centre-spread to leaven the mood of the day's edition.... Occasionally we will use the pages for a picture spread, although the single picture is the daily aim. The single picture is a far bolder statement, a tremendous vote of confidence in a photograph for its beauty or the strength of its news value. David's fascinating photograph of slums next to high-rise developments in Panama City is a great example of photojournalism, while his picture from the Royal Opera House has a compelling beauty. These pictures also have a tremendous feeling of 'being there', being an eyewitness."

While the Eyewitness series perhaps works best in print, where it is the only daily print photo feature of this size in the UK press, it has also proved popular on digital platforms. "It has translated very successfully to an online app," says Tooth, "which looks great on a high-definition tablet screen."

Filling Station, Dhaka, 2013

Honbasho, Osaka, 2009. All images courtesy David Levene

'David Levene: Eyewitness' will be on show at The Gallery at Foyles on Charing Cross Road from September 2 until October 26. The exhibition is curated by Mark Davy of Futurecity. David Levene will also take part in a discussion about the Eyewitness series on September 24 at 7pm. This event is free, but tickets need to be reserved in advance – more info is here.

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What makes a great image? CR's Photography Annual judges share their favourite work http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/alan-wilson http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/alan-wilson#feedback Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:15:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80570

With the deadline for submissions to CR's Photography Annual fast approaching, we asked this year's judges what they think makes a great image and which photos have caught their attention in the past 12 months. First up is Alan Wilson, art director at AMV BBDO in London... ]]>

Artist painting the scene in Hrushevsky Street, Kiev, by Adam Hinton

With the deadline for submissions to CR's Photography Annual fast approaching, we asked this year's judges what they think makes a great image and which photos have caught their attention in the past 12 months. First up is Alan Wilson, art director at AMV BBDO in London...

We're introducing some important changes to this year's Photography Annual. We want to celebrate not just the work of photographers themselves but also those who commission and art direct great images, whether in advertising, magazines online or via a photo library.

As well as adding categories for the best use of photography in advertising and marketing campaigns, by fashion brands and in editorial, we're introducing one to celebrate the best images commissioned by image libraries and for the first time, entries will be displayed in an online gallery.

Judges for this year include Jessica Crombie, head of visual creative at Save the Children, Sarah Douglas, creative director at Wallpaper, Daniel Moorey, head of print at Adam&EveDDB, Sarah Thomson, head of art production at Fallon London, Gemma Fletcher, senior art director at Getty Images and Alan Wilson, art director at AMV BBDO. Here, Wilson outlines his favourite photographers and recent series, from Evian's Live Young campaign to Adam Hinton's coverage of Kiev...

Protestor manning barricades at Hrushevsky Street, Kiev, by Adam Hinton

What image or series has impressed you most in the past 12 months?

Adam Hinton’s photographic coverage [top and above] of the political unrest in Kiev is incredible. Every so often I revisit certain photographers websites to see what they’ve been up to and this series pulled me straight in. Adam somehow managed to capture a real sense of intimacy during the violent unrest. And also, in the weeks that followed, as the protesters paid their respects to those who had given their lives.

What, to you, makes a great image?

It could be its anger and intensity. Maybe it beguiles you with its beauty. It could be a visionary idea. Maybe it’s a something you’ve never seen before. Or something very familiar, but approached in an extraordinary way. Most importantly, nomatter what the subject matter, a truly great image will stop you in your tracks.

What photographers do you think are doing really great work right now?

Where do I start? There are so many people producing incredible work right now. In no particular order: Blinkk [Leila and Damien de Blinkk], Nadav Kander, Robert Wilson, Hinton, Julia Fullerton-Batten, Tim Flach, Rankin, Alison Jackson, George Logan … I’ve been fortunate to work with some of them. I’d love to work with all of them.

Nadav Kander's Time Flies ad for Age UK (read our interview with Kandar about the making of the ad here).

101's ad for Scottish Widows, shot by Blinkk

Tim Flach's image of panda Ya Yun and Julia Fullerton Batten's Blind series, featured on the cover of CR's 2013 Photography Annual


George Logan's images for Whiskas Big Cat Little Cat campaign, winner of best life series at last year's AOP Awards


Alison Jackson's spoof images of Prince William and Kate and Prince Harry, featured on alisonjackson.com

And what organisations do you think are making great use of photography at the moment?

Only this morning on my way into work I couldn’t help but notice the Evian ‘Live Young’ poster campaign. It was hard not to notice because they’d taken over Oxford Circus tube station. It’s light hearted of course but what’s so impressive for me is that it’s for a water brand. It’s such a difficult brief and they've really made it stand out from the crowd. All done with absolute simplicity and charm.

Ads from Evian's Live Young campaign

The final deadline for entries to this year’s Photography Annual is September 11. For details on how to submit your work, or for more info about the annual, click here.

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Miranda July and Miu Miu launch Somebody app http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/miranda-july-and-mui-mui-launch-somebody-app http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/miranda-july-and-mui-mui-launch-somebody-app#feedback Fri, 29 Aug 2014 11:32:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80597

Miu Miu has teamed up with artist and filmmaker Miranda July to create a new app, Somebody, which allows you to send messages to friends and have them delivered, verbally, by a stranger nearby (who also has the app). I know, I know... you're thinking 'but when would I actually use that in the real world?' I was too, but then I watched July's quirky film to go with the app and suddenly this seems the way forward for all communication...

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Miu Miu has teamed up with artist and filmmaker Miranda July to create a new app, Somebody, which allows you to send messages to friends and have them delivered, verbally, by a stranger nearby (who also has the app). I know, I know... you're thinking 'but when would I actually use that in the real world?' I was too, but then I watched July's quirky film to go with the app and suddenly this seems the way forward for all communication...

Perhaps wisely, the app comes with a series of 'official hotspots', where users are particularly encouraged to use it. These are mostly galleries so far (including Los Angeles Museum of Art, Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and The New Museum in New York), where one might expect something a bit unexpected to happen anyway or, if it's an opening, you might be a little bit drunk. Here's July's film though, which brings the app to life in entertaining fashion:

somebodyapp.com

Credits:
Interactive production company: Stinkdigital

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How Zembla might have looked http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/how-zembla-might-have-looked http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/how-zembla-might-have-looked#feedback Fri, 29 Aug 2014 10:28:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80596

It's always fascinating to see how things might have looked if different design directions had been taken. Matt Willey recently shared a video of the dozens of alternate cover and logo designs considered for the late, lamented Zembla magazine.

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It's always fascinating to see how things might have looked if different design directions had been taken. Matt Willey recently shared a video of the dozens of alternate cover and logo designs considered for the late, lamented Zembla magazine.

Launched in 2003, Zembla was a mould-breaking literary magazine. Though it survived for just eight issues, its bravura art direction and brilliant photography won many awards for the team of creative director Vince Frost, editor Dan Crowe and Dan Crowe and design director Matt Willey (CR's designer of the year for 2014).

Some of the spirit of Zembla survives in Port magazine, the men's title founded by Crowe, Willey and Kuchar Swara. In this video, shown at the Semi-Permanent conference in Auckland this year, Willey gives us a glimpse of what might have been with "just a few of the hundreds of cover tries" he and Frost went through for Zembla's launch issue.

 

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New Guinness Africa ad launches 'Made of Black' tag http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/new-guinness-africa-ad-launches-made-of-black-tag http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/new-guinness-africa-ad-launches-made-of-black-tag#feedback Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:40:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80557

AMV BBDO has created a new Guinness ad for the Pan African market. Aimed squarely at a youth audience, it features a new tagline, 'Made of Black'...

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AMV BBDO has created a new Guinness ad for the Pan African market. Aimed squarely at a youth audience, it features a new tagline, 'Made of Black'...

The ad runs at over two minutes long and features a range of African performers and artists. It is set to a soundtrack of Kanye West's Black Skinhead. The spot launched last night on MTV Base, as part of a four-hour takeover by Guinness on the channel, which featured guest appearances by musicians including Fuse ODG and Phyno. Shown below is the ad, alongside two posters from the campaign:

According to the press release, the 'Made of Black' tagline aims to assert Guinness' uniqueness as a black beer. It is also clearly trying to tie the beer into certain aspects of black culture – particularly music and dance. "The idea behind the #madeofblack campaign is to celebrate the confidence and attitude that Guinness shares with the people who drink it, an attitude that we’ve called ‘Black’," says the release. "#madeofblack is not about colour. Its focus is on celebrating those that exhibit this Black attitude."

This can feel a little confusing to European fans of Guinness, who associate the stout firmly with Ireland. Yet in Africa this link is not particularly strong, as this article on the Smithsonian.com explains. This gives the brand more flexiblity to establish itself in the African market on different terms, however some of the lines featured here – 'Black dances to a different beat', for example, or 'Black writes its own rules' – feel clichéd and lazy, rather than dynamic and new. As a piece of film though, it is slick and stylish, and certainly fresh for Guinness: it will be interesting to see how it plays out with the youth market it is pitched at.

Credits:
Agency: AMV BBDO
Creative director: Mike Schalit
Creatives: Mike Sutherland, Antony Nelson
Production company: Rogue Films
Director: Sam Brown
Post: The Mill

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What would a UK flag look like without Scotland? http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/what-the-fuk http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/what-the-fuk#feedback Thu, 28 Aug 2014 11:03:00 +0000 Quentin Newark and Kevin Denoual http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80552 On September 18, Scotland will hold a vote on independence which could herald the break-up of the UK as we know it. If the Scots vote yes, will the UK need a new flag? If so, what would it look like? Atelier Works' Quentin Newark and Kevin Denoual have some suggestions

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On September 18, Scotland will hold a vote on independence which could herald the break-up of the UK as we know it. If the Scots vote yes, will the UK need a new flag? If so, what would it look like? Atelier Works' Quentin Newark and Kevin Denoual have some suggestions

If the vote for independence is successful, we will no longer be a United Kingdom, they write. Although the legal position is unclear, the worst aspect of this may be that we can no longer legally be known as such, so if there is no immediate back-up idea, just like the Former Yugoslavia, we might become the Former United Kingdom. Or fUK.

And it is possible that the Union Flag of the UK, created in 1707, to symbolise the "United Kingdom of Great Britain" will have to go.

 

The Union Jack (above), as the flag is colloquially known, is an amalgam of the flags of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland. In the sequence we show here: Scotland's saltire of St Andrew, England's cross of St George, and Northern Ireland's saltire of St Patrick. Wales ... simply doesn't exist. The two saltires have been made thinner so they don't cancel one another out, hence all that geometric complexity.

 


Although David Cameron calls the UK "countries within a country" the countries are not equal. England is a kingdom, Wales was a Principality, with Prince Charles as its Prince [In 2012 the ISO officially redesignated Wales as a country], and Northern Ireland is described variously as a "province" and a "territory". Somehow Wales fails to appear in any form on the flag, Ireland gets thinned out, and Scotland trumped by the big red cross of St George. Back in 1707, the other kingdom, Scotland was profoundly unhappy, and produced their own design with the white saltire dominant, which they cleverly wanted to use north of the border.

 


This issue of dominance is an old issue, it's interesting to look at the sketches of the Earl of Nottingham, four hundred year old design ideas, trying to reconcile two crosses (always with the red dominant), dating as early as 1604, a hundred years before the Union Jack, when James I first wanted to unite Scotland and England.

 


There is another interesting effort of amalgamation, dating from 1653, when Britain had no King. Much like France, which needed a new flag when it rid itself of King Louis XVI in 1793, Oliver Cromwell wanted the Commonwealth to have a new start. (That wonderful word Commonwealth, with its prototypical egalitarian implications, dates from this time.) The lion in the centre is Oliver Cromwell's own coat of arms ... he went on to act almost as a king, even being succeeded as Lord Protector by his son Richard Cromwell, who by all accounts was not what his father was, and fell from power, being known ever after as "Tumble-down Dick".

 


At last the point of this post: a piece of thinking about what the design of the new flag replacing the Union Jack could be.

We aren't the first. There is some background and some ideas on The Guardian site. And if your interest is really peeked, googling will reveal more. (But I doubt anyone has been as thorough as us.)


We have, in reverse order of popularity here in the studio, five potential designs for the fUK (Former United Kingdom).


Design one: Three countries in one

The simplest - and least imaginative - solution to Scotland disuniting, is simply to lift the saltire of St Andrew out of the flag. So just two red crosses. Quite nice. But wait, where is Wales? Where was Wales in the Union Jack? Why didn't they have an alternative version of the Union Jack that they presented to Queen Anne in 1707?


Our first design uses the cross of St George, and adds emblems from the flags of Northern Ireland and Wales. (The Red Hand of Ulster [dates back into the mists of time] and the Red Dragon of Wales [dates back to at least 800AD].) The great advantage of this flag is that for the first time, it represents the actual number of countries. Three. Wales gets a showing.

 


Design two: Joining Napoleon's Europe

As he conquered countries, Napoleon replaced their 'old' flags with the new tricolore. Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy... I imagine he had a plan to reflag all of Europe. Several countries in Europe have subsequently adopted a tricolore.

Napoleon didn't design the tricolore, though. He just brought it unequivocal prominence as France's only flag.

 

Somehow a whole crop of countries have gone for the horizontal tricolore. Starting with the Netherlands. Perhaps its a Protestant or Teutonic thing. (And those countries under Teutonic influence.) Loving the modernity, the simplicity, but not wanting to pay any acknowledgement to Catholic France.


For the purposes of our messianic redesign project, we have brought these horizontal deviants into the vertical fold.

So, proposal two is: do what works. We have the logical internationally agreed units of measurement, the metre, the kilogram, we comply in all significant areas with shipping and flight paths, currency valuations, contract terminology, interlocking legal codes, lets add one more area of interconnectedness: our flag.

There is also the neatness that the tricolore is three bands of colour, one for each of the fUK's three countries.

Three countries, three colours: red for England, green for Wales, red for Northern Ireland


Design three: Three lions

The three lions has been an emblem for England for a thousand years. It began in France. (Don't tell the Daily Mail.) In the deep middle ages, a set of lions was the heraldic symbol for the Counts of Anjou - the numbers of lions varied, sometimes four, sometimes six, probably according to what they were displayed on, more space, more lions. Here is an image of Geoffrey Plantagenet, who married King Henry of England's daughter, Matilda. Through convolutions too lengthy to ever remember, his son became Henry II, King of England and the Plantagenet family with their crest of lions came to rule England (and Wales) and some of the time Scotland for three hundred years.

It is already used as the "royal banner of England" (pic source here).

Our proposal is the the flag come to represent the fUK. The Irish and Welsh are (presumably) happy to be known as the British Lions when it comes to rugby - the Lions is the team with players from each of the countries within Great Britain. Could they be happy to be one of the metaphorical lions on a new flag? We think this solution particularly suits British pugnacity - our willingness to fight with anyone, anywhere. Drunk or sober.


Design four: The white cliffs of Dover

The white cliffs of Dover were used in their campaign for the recent European elections by the maverick political party UKIP, as a symbol of all that is most precious to our "country".

(There are exactly matching white cliffs of Normandy too. No one plonked in front of them could tell them apart, they are made of the same chalk.)

Our fourth design is a flag based on the white cliffs - the bit of Britain that faces out towards the 'rest of the world'.


This version was chosen by the designer here in the studio who drew it, Kevin, who is French, because it looks like Britain seen from France.


Design five: Rose Rising

More history.

A word on flags, countries, and history. I think you ignore history at your peril. People need to feel that their flag represents something communal that they can (literally) look up to. Something that represents an essence of the history and relationships that they share with their fellow countrymen, something that can be shared even with their ancestors. Something that has been dug out of the shared nationality like the most concentrated diamond.

Not something that has just sprung from an artist's or designer's capricious imagination, and can only be understood in terms of that individual. Flags are about what is common. In the wonderful word of Oliver Cromwell's era: the Commonwealth.

Even a very modern flag design like the tricolore, which is so reductive and timeless it is simply three colours, is explained with reference to what the colours represent, deep strains of French culture.

So.

If the Tudor Rose is unfamiliar to you, read here. It's been a potent symbol of Britain for five hundred years. Long enough for its association with one particular family to be forgotten. What most people fail to realise is that it is actually two roses combined, a white fused with a red. It is a symbol of unity. Of two opposing sides, being at peace and united.


We love the fact that the symbol seems to cover so many aspects of the fUK.

It represents:
- unity: people of opposing views happily living alongside one another
- the fruitfulness of the British Isles: the verdance, the countryside, the gardens
- did we mention gardens: Britain's favourite activity
- the meandering, wiggly, organic paths that human lives and human interaction takes
- growth
- different petals, but one shared heart
- the cycle of life: constant renewal

 


We think this says so much more than something so reductive like the tricolore, which can only be about the association of colours. (Kevin agrees.) With the rose we get colours, and we get symbolism that works for the past, and the future. Whether it is rendered with more drawing and more detail, or flat and graphically, we aren't sure. Beautiful, memorable, unique in the world of flags.

It makes us feel slightly better about living in the fUK.

 

This post was originally published on the Atelier Works blog and is reproduced by permission.

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New illustrators: Dan Matutina http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/dan-matutina http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/dan-matutina#feedback Thu, 28 Aug 2014 10:25:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80496

As part of a series profiling new and newly signed illustrators, we spoke to Dan Matutina - a graphic designer and illustrator based in the Philippines.

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As part of a series profiling new and newly signed illustrators, we spoke to Dan Matutina - a graphic designer and illustrator based in the Philippines.

Matutina's artwork is inspired by science fiction, folklore and comic books. He has been commissioned by Airbnb, Wired, Fast Co and Google, is co-founder of Manila design studio Plus63 and received an ADC Young Guns award in 2013. We asked him a few questions about his career so far...

Could you tell us a little about your background and career so far?

I grew up in a province an hour away by plane from Manila, where I'm now based. My time in high school was spent studying science and engineering, but I was already doodling and drawing then. In my final year, I finally decided to pursue a degree in fine arts and major in visual communication.

When I was at university, my first love was filmmaking. But because it was really expensive to make one at that time, I focused on graphic design and illustration. After I graduated, I worked as an art director for an advertising agency for three years and after that, I started my first design studio with four of my friends. We went our separate ways five years later and I started Plus63 Design Co. I did a lot of freelance illustration in between design work [and] this is when I started getting commissions from different magazines and publications.

Animation for Lovaganza 2015, art directed by Matutina

How would you describe your illustration style?

It's very geometric and angular. It features clean shapes and lines combined with textures, brush strokes and spatters. I use a limited palette, but I do add a new set of colors from time to time.

You also run a design studio, Plus63. Could you tell us a little more about it?

I started with Plus63 with some friends three years ago. Plus63’s name came from an area code of the Philippines. We're a very small team - there's only four of us - but we work with writers and other specialists when needed. Our projects are mostly brand identity, print and cause-oriented design projects. We did the Design Co.Mission last year [the studio sent out 'mission packs' to studios in the Philippines, in an attempt to encourage designers to collaborate on design solutions to improve public services, health and education in the region] and we're working with an international organisation for a Disaster Preparation project.

Plus63's DesignCo.Mission kit, sent to design studios in the Philippines

How do you balance freelance projects and running the studio? Do you focus more on one or the other?

Working in my design studio is my day job while illustration is my night job, but I do try to pace the projects I accept so I don't overwork myself. It's almost an even split - I get more illustration projects, but I log more hours on design projects.

And what is the creative/design scene like in Manila?

The creative scene in Manila is very exciting right now. It might not be as advanced as the creative scenes in Western countries but it might be as vibrant. People like to go to design events and conferences, like Graphika Manila, collaborations between different industries and disciplines are happening, and companies are starting to invest more in design. A lot of good young designers and illustrators are also cropping up. The industry, compared to advertising, is still fairly young, but that's what makes it exciting. People want to be part of the movement.


Illustration for IBM

Who or what are your biggest creative influences? And where do you look for inspiration?

I have a lot of creative influences. A whole group of them are national artists from the Philippines. One is Arturo Luz, another is Vicenta Manansala, for whom I recently made an illustrated tribute for a local magazine. I used to see his works in my high school textbooks and loved them even then. There's also Ang Kiukok and HR Ocampo.

I love the works of Eyvind Earle, Erik Nitsche, Paul Klee, Syd Mead, Charley Harper, Hayao Miyazaki, Fortunato Depero, Eduardo Chillida, and a whole lot more - I've been inspired by the works of my contemporaries and friends. I'm also inspired by film, science and technology, manga and anime, folklore, myths and legends.

Illustration for Wired UK

When did you first develop an interest in illustration?

When I was a child I drew a lot of cartoon characters. I grew up watching Thundercats, Voltron, Mazinger Z, Disney films, Robotech, G-Force, Silver Hawks, Adventures of Tintin, TMNT and other cartoons and comic books, including local ones. So most of those characters were always in my sketches and doodles. When I got a bit older, I made my own characters, comic series and stories.

Artwork for FastCo & the Guardian

You grew up in Tacloban City [in Eastern Visayas, the Philippines], which you describe as an area 'rich in folklore'. Has this influenced or inspired your work at all?

I've always believed that part of a person is defined by where he/she's from. Growing up in the province and hearing all of the different folklores and myths influenced me when I tell and write stories. We have a ton of islands in the Philippines (about 7,107 to be precise) and each has its own unique cultures and legends. The Leyte and Samar provinces, of which Tacloban City is the capital, are rich with stories of flying people, monsters, big dogs, witchcraft and magic. Some of those elements can be found in my personal projects. I rarely use them for client work, but I sometimes insert them as graphic elements when I can.


Illustration for Paypal

Which project have you most enjoyed working on, or is most special to you?

I'm really proud of my Versus/Hearts project [an illustration series depicting rival game, TV and comic characters embraced in the shape of a heart]. It's a simple project that made a lot of people happy. I think it's my most popular project as well. It's been on hiatus for quite some time now, but I plan to make new posts soon.

Another recent favourite is the animated piece I made for Colin Hesterly and The Academy for Lovaganza 2015 [above]. It was a collaborative project and I was very happy with the result - I did the design and illustration, while Colin directed and animated it with Jordan Scott.

Who or what would be your dream commission?

Some of the projects I've worked on recently were dream projects/clients of mine. Right now my dream illustration commissions would be from either Xbox, The New Yorker or Disney/Pixar.

And finally, any projects coming up that you're particularly excited about?

I've been forever working on a personal book project that morphed countless of times already - I'm still finishing the manuscript right now. I'm also working on a really short animation project with a friend of mine, and just finished a cover illustration for big tech company to be used in one of their events.

Artwork for Wired Italia

Rogue magazine

Dan Matutina is now represented by Agent Pekka (and YCN in the UK). You can see more of his work at twistedfork.me or plus63.com.

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TM: The Untold Stories Behind 29 Classic Logos http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/tm-untold-stories-behind-29-classic-logos-sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/tm-untold-stories-behind-29-classic-logos-sinclair#feedback Thu, 28 Aug 2014 08:45:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80536

New book TM is the result of eighteen months of research to expand our 2011 'logos' issue into a collection of in-depth case studies on 29 of the world's best examples – from British Steel, Centre Pompidou and ERCO, to the Musée d'Orsay, Pirelli and UPS...

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New book TM is the result of eighteen months of research to expand our 2011 'logos' issue into a collection of in-depth case studies on 29 of the world's best examples – from British Steel, Centre Pompidou and ERCO, to the Musée d'Orsay, Pirelli and UPS...

The seeds of the book were sown in the special issue of CR we devoted to the 20 logos that we felt represented the best that the form had to offer. In it my colleagues and I attempted to unravel how these various symbols and marks had been created and, where possible, talk to the designers behind them. (As a result the new book also contains writing and research by Patrick Burgoyne, Gavin Lucas and Eliza Williams).

CR readers can save 30% off the price of TM by using the code 'TMCR30' when prompted at the checkout – go here for more details.

The logos for the Woolmark, Deutsche Bank, British Rail, Michelin and the V&A Museum had topped our list in the magazine and warranted the most coverage. But what if a book of essay-length pieces could further explore some of the highlights from the issue (Canadian National, CBS or London Underground), while extending the reach to include a range of other great examples from around the world?

The result led me to conduct detailed interviews with well known designers such as David Gentleman (British Steel), Mike Dempsey (ENO), Bruno Monguzzi (Musée d'Orsay) and Ben Bos (Randstad); while tracking down lesser known practitioners who had nonetheless created designs with remarkable back stories – like Coordt von Mannstein, the designer given the challenge of reworking Otl Aicher's original symbol for the Munich Olympics in 1972; or Ignacio Vasallo, Spain's then junior minister for tourism who hit upon the idea of asking artist Joan Miró to create an abstract sun design for the country's fledgling tourist industry.

(A full contents list is on the back cover of the book, shown at the bottom of this post.)

The case of the Woolmark, however, proved unique in that the new research would lead to a definitive statement of authorship through the designer Franco Grignani's daughter, Manuela. She explained how she had witnessed her father create the famous design on a tablecloth. The design went on to be voted in as a new symbol of the International Wool Secretariat, but the fact that Grignani was one of the jurors on the committee to decide the Woolmark complicated matters considerably, and his creation of the logo was a secret he held onto for decades. (This essay is republished in the current issue of CR.)

Other than interviews the history of many of the logos – such as Coca-Cola's – involved working with company collections and archives (in this case early twentieth-century court records). While others – Manolo Prieto's 1956 design for the Osborne Bull, the famous roadside silhouette in Spain, for example – meant contacting a range of people from collectors to photographers (the 'bulls' are particularly well documented on Flickr).

Amid debate in recent years as to whether 'the logo' is finished altogether, it also seemed appropriate to examine what work still caught the imagination of designers and the public alike; what logos and symbols had lasted; and what designs would continue to work, indeed, evolve into the future. As the book progressed it became apparent that the logo for the V&A would become a key example of something that could move with the times.

Designed by Pentagram's Alan Fletcher in 1989 (and still in use) it is a sublime example of the form. But far from remaining a static creation, it was given a new lease of life only a few years ago when a kinetic version of the logo was unveiled by Troika studio at one of the museum's subway entrances: A palindromic sculpture in which the letters twist on their own axis, deconstructing and remaking the logo each time it revolves (shown in the book, below).

One can imagine that Fletcher would have enjoyed the celebration of his work in this way, and would also have been pleased that his design contained another surprise within its form, which was just waiting for the right moment to appear.

That capacity for renewal added to the case for its status and inclusion in the book and my hope is that the stories behind the other 28 will, in their own ways, offer similar revelations.

TM: The Untold Stories Behind 29 Classic Logos by Mark Sinclair is published by Laurence King; £28. My thanks go to Patrick, Gavin and Eliza for their help throughout the project and to Nathan Gale of Intercity who designed the book.

CR readers can save 30% off the price of TM by using the code 'TMCR30' when prompted at the checkout – go here for more details.

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How Sivu's Better Man Than He promo was made http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/better-man-than-he-making-of http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/better-man-than-he-making-of#feedback Wed, 27 Aug 2014 17:01:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80511

Earlier this year, unsigned singer Sivu and director Adam Powell made a mesmerising video for single Better Than Me using an MRI scanner at London's St Bart's Hospital. To celebrate the single's release next month, Sivu has released a short film revealing how the promo was made...

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Earlier this year, unsigned singer Sivu and director Adam Powell made a mesmerising video for single Better Than Me using an MRI scanner at London's St Bart's Hospital. To celebrate the single's release next month, Sivu has released a short film revealing how the promo was made...

Better Man Than He features footage of Sivu singing into an MRI machine, which uses magnetic fields and radio waves to generate images of the body. The three-minute film offers a fascinating glimspe at the singer's brain, muscles and movements, with additional effects added in post production:

The video was released in January this year and has since received more than 600,000 views on YouTube. As Page explains in a new film on the making of the project, Powell, then his flatmate, suggested using an MRI scanner as a cheaper alternative to using costly cameras and filming equipment.

He contacted doctors Marc Miguel and Andrew Scott, who had spent a year researching how to capture moving images using MRI machines in an attempt to learn more about cleft palates and agreed to help make the film at St Bart's. As Miguel and Scott explain, Page was required to wear a large head covering, known as a coil, while inside the scanner, which allowed it to generate detailed images depicting 'slices' of his head.

It's an innovative technique - the video is allegedly the first to use real time MRI scans - and the result is visually striking. Since its release, Sivu has been signed to Atlantic Records, while Powell has since directed promos for The 1975 and Example. The film has also been screened in medical conferences and university lectures.

Better Man Than Me is released on September 29. Page's debut album, Something On High, is released in October.

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Ciclope Festival 2014 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/ciclope-festival-2014 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/august/ciclope-festival-2014#feedback Wed, 27 Aug 2014 15:52:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=80505

While there are a multitude of festivals devoted to the business and ideas sides of advertising, its craft can fall a little by the wayside. Not at Ciclope Festival, however, which is entirely devoted to the celebration of ad craft. The latest edition of the festival takes place on November 6-7 in Berlin.

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While there are a multitude of festivals devoted to the business and ideas sides of advertising, its craft can fall a little by the wayside. Not at Ciclope Festival, however, which is entirely devoted to the celebration of ad craft. The latest edition of the festival takes place on November 6-7 in Berlin.

Ciclope Festival has been running since 2010 and for its first three years took place in Buenos Aires, before moving to Berlin in 2013. This year's event is the second to be held in the German capital, and will consist of a conference and networking events, as well as an awards ceremony, celebrating the best work in advertising craft this year.

Among those lined up to speak at this year's festival are Andreas Nilsson, the director behind the Volvo Trucks Epic Split commercial; Mike McGee, creative director at Framestore; and Guido Heffels, co-founder of Heimat ad agency. There will also be top creatives from agencies including Wieden + Kennedy, Droga5, Saatchi & Saatchi, 72andSunny, and many more taking part in the networking events. For a full list of guests and more info on attending the festival or entering the awards, visit ciclopefestival.com.

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