CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Mon, 03 Aug 2015 18:11:59 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 CR Talent Spotting now live on digital screens across the UK http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/talent-spotting-jcdecaux-beframeus-creative-translation http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/talent-spotting-jcdecaux-beframeus-creative-translation#feedback Mon, 03 Aug 2015 15:10:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91942

Creative Review has teamed up with JCDecaux to showcase graduate art and design talent across digital screens UK-wide, running in rail stations, malls and supermarkets from today...

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Glasgow School of Art graduate Alan Knox's Schengland project – on display as part of the CR Talent Spotting scheme

Creative Review has teamed up with JCDecaux to showcase graduate art and design talent across digital screens UK-wide, running in rail stations, malls and supermarkets from today...

How Edinburgh College of Art graduate Ailsa Johnson's work will look on site at St Pancras station


For our Talent Spotting project – set up in association with Creative Translation – we have selected work from 20 graduates to appear on the screens, including illustration, photography and animation.

Each site is captioned with the graduate's name and university as well as a URL for our project page on the CR site where full details of their work – and where to see it – can be found. The Talent Spotting homepage is here.

Maciek Martyniuk – aka Yo Magick – is a graduate of Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology in Dublin. Examples of his Nice Posters will be on display as part of our Talent Spotting series

Honey Parast's work will also feature on digital screens across the UK. Parast is a graduate of Plymouth University

Central St Martins' graduate Heeen Kang's illustrations will also feature

 

Our graduates come from all over the UK and their work will be shown across over 1,000 landscape and portrait screens, reaching 50% of the UK population. The initiative is part of JCDecaux's 'Beframeus' series of editorial projects, which launched October 2014.

The sites include rail hubs nationwide – from Euston, King's Cross, Liverpool Street, London Bridge, St. Pancras, Victoria and Waterloo in London, to Brighton, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool Lime Street, Manchester Piccadilly, Newcastle, Nottingham, Sheffield, York to name but a few.

Glasgow School of Art graduate Alan Knox's Schengland project will be shown as part of the Talent Spotting scheme

Abstractions of London's Barbican Centre, captured by Andrew O'Dell, a graduate of Middlesex University, will also be shown as part of CR Talent Spotting

 

Retail screens in major shopping destinations such as Bluewater, Intu Lakeside, Bullring (Birmingham), St David's (Cardiff), Liverpool One and Eldon Square (Newcastle) and Brent Cross (London).

"This inspirational showcase will put the work of new design talent in front of an audience of millions, celebrating the next generation of artists," says Russell Gower, creative content director at JCDecaux. "We are delighted to bring Creative Review's Talent Spotting initiative to our screens, part of our Beframeus editorial schedule across our digital channel."

We are profiling many of the CR Talent Spotting graduates as part of our ongoing GradWatch series on the blog. You can find out more about our 20 graduates chosen for the Talent Spotting initiative at creativereview.co.uk/talent-spotting.

 

In association with Creative Translation

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TV's two-hour canal trip, complete with slow typography http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/all-aboard-canal-trip-type http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/all-aboard-canal-trip-type#feedback Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:07:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91892

This week BBC4 screened All Aboard! The Canal Trip, a two-hour real-time journey down the Kennet and Avon canal in England. The graceful movement and lulling sounds of the waterways made for compelling 'slow TV' but perhaps the cleverest part of the project was the use of type that appeared on bridges, passing boats and even on the water...

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This week BBC4 screened All Aboard! The Canal Trip, a two-hour real-time journey down the Kennet and Avon canal in England. The graceful movement and lulling sounds of the waterways made for compelling 'slow TV' but perhaps the cleverest part of the project was the use of type that appeared on bridges, passing boats and even on the water...

 

The Garden Productions' film, which originally aired in May and is now on the BBC iPlayer, was billed as a gentle antidote to television's usual pace. And in fixing a camera to the bow of a boat, the beauty of The Canal Trip was its simplicity – a single 120-minute shot brought home some of the sights and sounds that people experience on the water.

But with the journey from Top Lock in Bath to the Dundas Aqueduct offering up numerous opportunities for conveying historic detail, the programme also aimed at being informative. So how to convey the relevant information without shattering the calm with an intrusive voiceover? Subtitles?

Well, in a way, yes – but the actual solution created by visual effects and animation studio Compost was far more in-keeping with the aesthetic of the film and a masterclass in subtlety.

 

From the opening shot – showing the lock at Bath, see image at the top of the post – it was clear that this film was going to be a little different and, as it progressed, snippets of social history appeared without fanfare on the surrounding environment.

Alongside archive stills sewn into the footage to show where old buildings had once existed, or what the canal had looked like when it froze over (see third image below), text was also placed over the film at various points, delivering facts about a particular part of the canal or its place in local social history.

 

Typography has always been linked with Britain's canals and waterways through the signpainting tradition, and, for All Aboard!, this treatment was replicated a few times on the sides of passing boats.

 

Text also appeared on various bridges as the camera went under them and in panels which floated on the water. While the water-borne type was locked off in panels (and thankfully didn't obey the ups and downs of the current), the bridge-based type often seemed to hark back to the time period in question.

The end result was a perfect match of film, subject matter and type which came together to make the whole two-hour journey even more enjoyable.

Compost has a showreel of sequences from the project on its website at compostcreative.com. Producer: Luke Korzun Martin; Sound Recordist: Marc Hatch; Director of Photography: Steve Robinson. All Aboard! The Canal Trip is on the iPlayer here.

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Penguin's new website offers free book extracts to Tube passengers http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/summer-of-penguin http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/summer-of-penguin#feedback Fri, 31 Jul 2015 12:05:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91891

Penguin has launched a new website offering London Underground passengers access to free book extracts and author interviews as part of a campaign to celebrate its 80th birthday.

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Penguin has launched a new website offering London Underground passengers access to free book extracts and author interviews as part of a campaign to celebrate its 80th birthday.

From August 3 - 28, Tube passengers using Virgin WiFi (and anyone with an internet connection)  can read exclusive excerpts from novels, as well as author interviews and audio content at summerofpenguin.com. The site was launched in partnership with TfL and Virgin Media.

Penguin says new content will be added daily: it currently features an extract from Emma Healey novel Elizabeth is Missing, another from Nick Hornby book Funny Girl and one from Stephen Fry's forthcoming memoir More Fool Me. There's also a page of notes from one of Raymond Chandler's notebooks.

The website was created in-house and features a similarly minimal design to one launched to promote its Little Black Classics series earlier this year (a collection of 80 classic titles priced at 80p each, also released to celebrate Penguin's birthday). There's some lovely added touches, too, with colours loosely referencing different Tube lines and icons to accompany each extract designed by Rob Lowe. At the end of each excerpt is a cover shot of the book it is taken from and a link to buy the publication online.

Hannah Telfer, group director of consumer and digital development at Penguin Random House UK, says: “We want audiences to discover, access and enjoy our authors’ books and content – wherever they are – in new and innovative ways. This partnership takes the written word beyond the page to inspire and entertain travellers on the London Underground and celebrates the stories, writing and ideas that have shaped Penguin over the past eighty years, as well as the incredible talent that we publish now as part of Penguin Random House.” It's a great idea, and for fans of Penguin's output, it should make those hot and crowded summer Tube journeys a little more bearable.

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Jeremy Deller designs new banknote for the Brixton Pound http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/jeremy-deller-brixton-pound http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/jeremy-deller-brixton-pound#feedback Fri, 31 Jul 2015 11:09:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91856

To celebrate five years of the Brixton Pound, the capital's only local currency, the organisation commissioned artist Jeremy Deller to design a new B£5 note. The result is both psychedelic and political and continues to challenge more traditional approaches to banknote design...

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To celebrate five years of the Brixton Pound, the capital's only local currency, the organisation commissioned artist Jeremy Deller to design a new B£5 note. The result is both psychedelic and political and continues to challenge more traditional approaches to banknote design...

 

A handful of other local currencies currently exist in the UK – in Totnes, Lewes, Stroud and, from 2012, Bristol. "It's a simple premise – [it's a] local currency that can only be used in independent local businesses," explains Charlie Waterhouse, creative director of This Ain’t Rock’n’Roll, the studio that designed the second series of the Brixton Pound notes in 2011 and oversaw the new Deller note.

"You buy a coffee in an independent café and the money probably goes to the people who are serving you," Waterhouse adds. "You buy a coffee in a chain, and the money probably goes to City shareholders. It's a more virtuous circulation of cash."


The Brixton Pound initiative was started by volunteers from the Transition Town Brixton community-led organisation. In TARR's redesign of the currency in 2011 – see our story here – the studio incorporated images of some of the areas most respected sons and daughters: David Bowie features on the B£10 note (above); Chicago Bulls basketball player, Luol Deng, on the regular B£5; and WWII spy, Violette Szabo, on the B£20. Len Garrison, the co-founder of the Black Cultural Archives appears on the B£1 note.

 

The special edition B£5 has been produced in collaboration with Fraser Muggeridge Studios under the creative direction of TARR. Each note has a unique serial number from its limited print run and is now available from local stockists and online via brixtonpound.org/shop.

For the reverse of the new B£5 note, shown below, Deller chose to feature a quote from Karl Marx's Capital.

 

In a forthcoming blog post about the project, Waterhouse asks Nigel Dodd, Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics to offer his thoughts on the design: "On the reverse side, Marx reminds us of the dangers of treating money as a fetish, and of viewing it as a thing that can create value all by itself," writes Dodd.

"He taught us that money's value depends on the very social relations that such treatment denies, and these are the social relations that a local currency such as the Brixton£ brings to the fore, and which are represented on its front side. What I really like about this note is the way the image on one side speaks to the text on the other."

According to the Brixton£, Deller's new design "adds a significant and provocative message that reflects our intention to raise the conversation of how we understand, use and value money in this time of economic instability and what we could aspire to in the future".

"On two small sides of paper it provides an utterly compelling response to Austerity Kool-Aid," adds Waterhouse. "It simultaneously challenges and inspires, perfectly enunciating the positivity inherent in much of the grassroots response and resistance to the current economic situation."

The new design also reflects some of the innovations that the Brixton Pound has brought in over the last few years, such as pay-by-text and contactless payment across the 300-odd independent businesses that take the currency.

"The new Brixton Pound fiver drives home the simple fact that we can all make positive choices around our spending," adds Waterhouse.

More on the new B£5 at brixtonpound.org. The Brixton£ blog is here. See also thisaintrocknroll.com

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Exposure: Photographer Jack Davison http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/exposure-photographer-jack-davison http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/exposure-photographer-jack-davison#feedback Fri, 31 Jul 2015 11:00:00 +0000 Gemma Fletcher http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91865

Art Director Gemma Fletcher examines the work of Photographer Jack Davison, in the latest installment of a series looking into new talent in photography, from recent graduates to photographers breaking into the industry...

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Art director Gemma Fletcher examines the work of photographer Jack Davison, in the latest installment of a series looking into new talent in photography, from recent graduates to photographers breaking into the industry...

 

Fred

 

There is something about Jack Davison's sensibility and conviction, which makes his place in photographic history feel like it has already been secured, despite him only recently emerging onto the scene in the last couple of years.

Davison always knew he wanted to be a photographer from a young age, and although he followed an unlikely path and studied English literature at university, it was with a view to move into photography as a profession after graduating.

 

We the troupe for Port Magazine

 

Davison's work is fresh and mature, raw yet stylized, and he has a strong vision and a confident portfolio for someone only a year into his career.

His work feels like a modern take on some of the masters of photography - Irving Penn, Ernst Haas and August Sander all come to mind - although the artist himself references the work of Viviane Maier and Viviane Sassen as key influences.

 

26 States

 

26 States

 

Motivated to further develop his portfolio, in 2013 Davison embarked on a six-month tour of the US, and began working professionally. His aim during the tour was to create a body of work that encapsulated his philosophy as a photographer, combining raw and unabashed portraiture of characters he met along the way with cinematic observations of the places he encountered. This series, 26 States, is his most significant body of work to date.

 

 

Port Magazine commissioned Davison to bring his unique and organic style to a fashion editorial in 2014, giving his work substantial exposure for the first time.

He has since built a strong editorial portfolio shooting most recently for the first edition of Avaunt Magazine. His masterful approach towards fashion features captures the imagination of even the most fashion adverse.

 

Hundreds of Hills for Avaunt magazine

 

Hundreds of Hills for Avaunt magazine

 

I'm looking forward to watching how his style translates across different brands and genres. Now represented by Mini Title, with some exciting commercial jobs in production, Davison is truly making a name for himself as a bright young talent.

 

Garage magazine


www.jackdavison.co.uk

www.gemfletcher.com

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Mondial: a beautiful new brand magazine from Rapha http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/rapha-mondial http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/rapha-mondial#feedback Fri, 31 Jul 2015 09:26:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91848

With some thought-provoking content and an aesthetic inspired by Twen and vintage cycling magazines, Rapha's new publication Mondial offers a stylish alternative to sport and gear-focused titles, and a beautiful showcase of the brand's products.

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With some thought-provoking content and an aesthetic inspired by Twen and vintage cycling magazines, Rapha's new publication Mondial offers a stylish alternative to sport and gear-focused titles, and a beautiful showcase of the brand's products.

Rapha was founded by Simon Mottram in 2004, with the aim of providing a more subtle and minimal alternative to cycling apparel in clashing colours, swirls and racing stripes. Its early collections were heavily inspired by the jerseys worn by professional cyclists in the 1960s, the brand is named after a French team sponsored in the same decade by aperitif brand Saint-Raphaël, and its logo is based on hand-painted lettering spotted in a vintage book about the Tour de France.

Since its launch, Rapha has demonstrated the same understated approach in everything from its store design to products and marketing. Its brand photography by Ben Ingham has more in common with documentary and reportage imagery than glossy catalogue shots, while short films following its cycling teams  such as a series made by Andrew Telling, which we featured in our December 2013 issue  document not just the gruelling intensity of races, but the quieter moments in a cyclist's day, and the stunning scenery passed along the way. It's a strategy that has been hugely successful for the brand (if occasionally mocked), so it comes as no surprise that Rapha's new print magazine features a similarly refined design and romantic view of the sport.

 

Produced in-house and art directed by Jack Saunders (Rapha's in-house art director), Mondial is a bi-annual title, and Rapha's second venture into publishing. It launched cycling magazine Rouleur in 2006 but sold it to Gruppo Media in 2012. It may seem strange to launch another mag so soon, particularly given the amount of competition that has sprung up since Rouleur's launch, but in an introduction to Mondial, Mottram says the new title aims to offer a unique take on the sport. "Our ambition for Mondial is to broaden the horizons of what road cycling is and what the sport can be," he says, describing cycling not just as a sport, but as "a lens through which to view the world".

"Familiar cycling subjects are given a new angle.... But Mondial also brings a cycling viewpoint to broader cultural subjects and helps expand the sport's reference points," he writes, adding that readers "will find features on travel, driving fashion and wine that show just how relevant our sport is to the world around us" in each issue.

It's a grand ambition, but in the inaugural issue, Mondia succeeds in coupling features on riders, races and the sport's history with fashion, travel and wildlife content, resulting in a mag which has more in common with broadsheet supplements or men's style titles than most mainstream cycling mags.

There's a fascinating article which attempts to delve inside the mind of Sir Bradley Wiggins, looking at his fears and motivations; another on early 20th-century cycling clubs in New York, and another about the journey that inspired the brand's annual Manchester to London charity cycle. Alongside this, there's an interview with Mad Men writer Tom Stutts on TV, creativity and cycling to work in Los Angeles, a look at the use of big data in business and an essay by Tim Dee on the falcons, owls and other birds of prey which reside in various mountain ranges around the world. There's a great deal of content around famous cyclists and races, but just as much about fashion, travel and design.

The magazine's aesthetic is heavily inspired by old issues of Gazzetta Della Sport, the Italian newspaper which launched the Giro d'Italia race (Saunders says the pink cover is a homage to Gazzetta). Twen magazine, and more recent editorial design by Matt Willey, has also been a big influence, evident in the bold typographic feature openers throughout. The use of a custom typeface created by Colophon, however, gives Mondial its own distinct identity.

"We worked with Colophon foundry to develop the Mondial masthead and headline typeface," Saunders told CR . "Our brand fonts Trade Gothic and Adobe Caslon have always served us well but we felt there was space to do something new for Mondial  editorially, we wanted to bring more character to the pages.

"The final font is a dense condensed typeface with lots of quirky characteristics  it has an almost woodblock style with slightly rounded edges. Again, as with the other design cues in Mondial, there is an Italian influence. Lots of our research was directed at the Gazzetta and some old Italian type specimen books we have in the studio," he explains.

Inside, the magazine features a range of paper stocks and some beautiful photography: archive race imagery (including some from back issues of Rouleur) sits alongside new series from Ingham (who will be publishing photo essays from his travels with the brand in each issue) and some brilliant portraits of Wiggins by Jack Davison.

Dee's article on birds of prey is accompanied by Spencer Murphy's beautiful series Traces. "We intend to use Mondial as a way of championing long term collaborators and as a means to create new relationships with others that we admire," says Saunders. "We hope to work with photographers that come from outside the world of cycling as a means of gaining new perspectives on the sport."

Rapha's own archive was also a key source of inspiration for Mondial's design, and Saunders says that everything from early catalogues "through to the most recent expressions of our brand in-store and online provided a rich pool of creative work to reference and reinvent."

Design is a key focus within the magazine: features include an interview with architect and urban design consultant Jan Gehl, whose work is focused on improving cities for pedestrians and cyclists and another on Christopher Raeburn. This is also reflected in its advertising, with Paul Smith, Bang & Olufsen and Vitra among those who have placed page ads in issue one.

Particularly interesting is the brand's approach to promoting its own products. There are several features on Rapha collections, but the approach is subtle: there's a short article on the making of a data print by Accept & Proceed for Rapha's Pro Team collection, which uses race data generated by cyclist Peter Kennaugh (read our feature on the collection here) and an interesting article on the making of a commemorative jersey to honour of the 50th anniversary of Tom Simpson's World Champion title (he was the first Brit to receive it). Timothy Everett, a tailor who created a Rapha cycling suit in 2009, and Barbara Agnes, an accessories designer who created silk scarves for the brand this year, have also written articles on their craft and the joy of textiles and tailoring.

While most brands would feature at least a few pages of product shots, Rapha has instead focused on the stories or designers who created or inspired each collection. Most of these articles are accompanied by one or no images, with no prices or links to product pages.

Like all of Rapha's output, Mondial positions the brand as a lifestyle one, rather than simply a place to buy clothing and accessories. The magazine cements its reputation as a label for cyclists who want to look stylish, but it also contains a fascinating mix of content around the sport and broader cycling culture. Few brands make customer magazines people would be keen to pick up on the news stands, let alone pay for, but Rapha have done just that, and Mondial is a great example of branded content for a premium retailer.

Issue one of Mondial is out now and costs £10. For details or to order a copy see rapha.cc

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Hudson-Powell to join Pentagram London http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/hudson-powell-join-pentagram-london http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/hudson-powell-join-pentagram-london#feedback Thu, 30 Jul 2015 16:21:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91864

Pentagram has just announced that two new partners – brothers in fact – are set to join its London office. Luke Powell (above, on right) and Jody Hudson-Powell, whose studio Hudson-Powell was set up in 2005, will become part of the Pentagram stable in October this year...

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Jody Hudson-Powell and Luke Powell, photo courtesy of Haruko Tomioka-Krzeszowiec

Pentagram has just announced that two new partners – brothers in fact – are set to join its London office. Luke Powell (above, on right) and Jody Hudson-Powell, whose studio Hudson-Powell was set up in 2005, will become part of the Pentagram stable in October this year...

The duo both have backgrounds in graphic design but in their studio work have notably brought art and digital technology into play in the creation of some eye-catching immersive experiences. Since 2010, Jody has also been design director at agency Wolff Olins.

Previously, Hudson-Powell created the identity, signage system and typeface for CocaCola's Beatbox pavilion at the London 2012 Olympics; the logo and visual identity for the London-based restaurant chain, Canteen; and were behind the creation of the communications brand EE (at Wolff Olins). They also collaborated with studio UVA on stage visuals for Kylie Minogue's X tour.

Identity, signage system and bespoke typeface for Asif Khan & Pernilla Ohrstedt’s CocaCola’s Beatbox pavilion at the London 2012 Olympics. Photo: Hufton & Crowe

Logo and visual identity for Canteen

Grazing Jellies, an augmented installation commissioned by And Festival

 

"For the last decade we've explored the boundaries of the digital, physical, interactive and technological worlds," says Jody Hudson-Powell. "No matter what the project or medium, design has always led our creative process. That's why we feel so excited to join Pentagram which sets the bar for all types of design across the world."

No strangers to technology, Hudson-Powell also created the augmented reality projects Hungry Hungry Eat Heads (below) for the BBC (which was exhibited at MoMA) and Grazing Jellies (above), an installation commissioned by And Festival which placed virtual creatures in a real forest.

Hungry Hungry Eat Heads, an augmented reality project commissioned by the BBC and exhibited at the MoMa

 

In March, Hudson-Powell were involved in promoting Earth Hour, the global 'lights-out' event to raise awareness of climate change. WWF and environmental charity Do the Green Thing commissioned designers and artists to create a series of products using waste and everyday objects: HP created a series of stencils which can be used to turn unwanted cardboard boxes into toy robots. See our story on the project, here.

T-shirt design for Richard Nicoll

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Vice teams up with Magnum for new Photo Issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/vice-photo-annual http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/vice-photo-annual#feedback Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:26:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91855

Vice has teamed up with Magnum Photos for its latest annual Photography Issue, which is dedicated to social documentary and features work by new and established photographers from Europe, Africa, the US, Asia and the Middle East.

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Cover by Mikhael Subotzky, from the series Deep Hanging

Vice has teamed up with Magnum Photos for its latest annual Photography Issue, which is dedicated to social documentary and features work by new and established photographers from Europe, Africa, the US, Asia and the Middle East.

The issue comes with a choice of two covers, one by Dru Donovan from her series Positions Taken (featued below) and another by Mikhael Subotzky, pictured above. The publication is Vice's seventh photography annual, but the first produced in partnership with Magnum.

In an introduction to the issue, Magnum creative director Gideon Jacobs and Vice photo editor Matthew Leifheit describe it as a showcase of photographers whose work lies "at the crossroads between photojournalism and art".

Marmarilo Dreams by Carmen Catuti, which documents a new found interest in the Georgian Orthodox Church among Georgian youths who are turning away from Christianity

"We live in a world where millions of images are being made between the moment you started this sentence and the moment you'll finish it. There's an anxiety in professional photography over this new glut of picturesa fear that all these shareable, disappearing images of daily life somehow devalue the medium. But the truth is that this documentary practice has long been part of the photographic tradition," they write.

"[Featured artists'] approaches are diverse, but they share a knack for capturing the images that exist as resonant frequencies among the cacophony. Their pictures, about their hometowns, how we inhabit our homes, the silent presence of our political leaders, the lived experience of state violence, are illustrations of the enduring power of using a camera to understand the stories of our lives," they add.

Our NHS, by Lewis Khan

As editor Bruno Bayley noted in a press release announcing the partnership, Vice has been commissioning Magnum photographers for its print and online publications for several years. The issue features both Magnum and non-Magnum photographers, as well as artists supported by the Magnum Foundation, a scheme which provides mentoring, grants and fellowships to emerging photographers.

Featured work is diverse, provocative and sometimes harrowing, documenting crime, conflict, addiction, inequality and religion, as well as local communities and daily life in remote locations. Lewis Khan's Our NHS (pictured above) documents the NHS' legacy and uncertain future, while Alec Soth's There's No Place Like Nome captures the unique identity of the Alaskan town of Nomea place Soth says he has been "haunted by" since travelling there to photograph it for a magazine following the murder of a young girl.

There's No Place Like Nome, by Alec Soth


Subotzky and Lindokuhle Sobekwa's Deep Hanging project offers a compelling and at times harrowing look at life in South Africa: Subotzky's smashed and distorted images question the ethics of documentary photography, while Sobekwa's black-and-white shots capture poverty and nyaope addiction in townships.

 

Grey Hutton's Night Rooms, Al Zana, Gaza project captures bedrooms which have been reduced to rubble in Gaza:

 

Peter Van Agtmael documents his family and home life in Maryland:

 

And Donovan's Positions Taken, featuring young men from The Bronx, recreates their encounters with NYPD:

 

There's also an extract from a new photo book by Chris Shaw documenting the Sandy Hill Estate, on the borders of Hampshire:

 

Plus photography from Magnum's archives:

Eve Arnold, School for Nonviolence, 1960. The image on the left documents activists being trained not to react to provocation in a civil strike. On the right are Arnold's notes about the project, dated May 24 1960.


And work by Magnum Foundation photographers Pete Pin, Olga Kravets, Shehab Uddin, Pedro Silveira, Tanya Habjouqa and Poulomi Basu, which ranges from series exploring the oppression of African communities in Brazil, to the lives of pavement dwellers in Dhaka.

It's a powerful selection of images, and for Magnum, a great way to showcase its wealth of social documentary and reportage imagery, while also promoting its Foundation scheme. The issue offers a compelling look at different cultures, communities and social issues around the world, and given Vice's increasing focus on serious news content and investigative reporting alongside its more light hearted features, social documentary seems a fitting choice of theme.

You can see more work featured in the Photo Issue here.

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Gradwatch: Alan Knox http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/gradwatch-alan-knox http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/gradwatch-alan-knox#feedback Wed, 29 Jul 2015 09:47:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91834

After touring this year's degree shows, we've selected visual communications graduates from across the UK who we feel have produced outstanding creative portfolios. Here, we speak to photographer Alan Knox, who has just graduated with a first class degree in communication design from Glasgow School of Art and been selected as one of Daniel Blau Gallery's 5 Under 30.

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Schengland (2014) by Alan Knox

After touring this year's degree shows, we've selected visual communications graduates from across the UK who we feel have produced outstanding creative portfolios. Here, we speak to photographer Alan Knox, who has just graduated with a first class degree in communication design from Glasgow School of Art and been selected as one of Daniel Blau Gallery's 5 Under 30.

We were particularly impressed by Knox's poignant project Universal Sympathy, a series of celestial images made by scattering his grandfather's ashes onto photographic paper, and Schengland, which features screenshots from Google's Street View project placed upon images of the Anglo-Scots border. The project was inspired by last year's Scottish referendum, and debates around whether the country would be forced to erect border controls with England and join the Schengen zone if it became independent.

Knox has taken part in several group photography exhibitions (his work is currently on show at Daniel Blau Gallery in London) and this year, received the School of Design Chairman's Medal and Dissertation Prize from Glasgow School of Art. He has also undertaken work experience as a visual intern at the Financial Times.

 

Universal Sympathy (2015) by Alan Knox, courtesy of Daniel Blau Gallery

CR: When did you first become interested in photography?

AN: Although I'd always enjoyed taking photographs, my first memory of wanting to become a professional photographer came after viewing the 1990's BBC TV series Shooting the Past directed by Steven Poliakoff. I remember watching it and being captivated by a film where the story unfolded through still photographs, it was then that I first realised the narrative potential of photography. Later, whilst studying for an HND in Professional Photography at City of Glasgow College, I attended a class trip to an exhibition of the work of Japanese photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto, where I remember being overwhelmed by the sheer scale of both the physicality of the prints and the ideas on display. It was this exposure to conceptual photography during college which confirmed to me that this was where my passion lay.

Universal Sympathy (2015) by Alan Knox, courtesy of Daniel Blau Gallery

 

And why did you decide to study communication design after doing a photography HND? What were the most important things you learned from the course at Glasgow School of Art?

Studying communication design at Glasgow School of Art has allowed me to specialise in photography whilst working in a studio environment where students working in photography, graphic design and illustration are encouraged to adopt a cross-disciplinary approach and collaborate across specialisms.

Being part of this environment has encouraged me to constantly question the nature of photography from different perspectives and as a student, you are always encouraged to draw outside interests and theory into your practice. The design oriented nature of the course has also pushed me to develop new skills such as book-making, allowing me to produce a book of my Universal Sympathy project. Whilst working on my final year project, Universal Sympathy, the encouragement I received from my tutor Andy Stark was invaluable, who always reassured me my project was as much universal as it was personal to me.

 

Universal Sympathy (2015) by Alan Knox, courtesy of Daniel Blau Gallery


Universal Sympathy is a beautiful project. How did the idea for it come about, and how did you create the images?

In this project, I sought to explore the relationship between photography, death and the sublime. Several years ago I began documenting the process of scattering my grandfather's remains in places which were personal to him during his life. Over time however, it seemed that for such a sensitive subject matter, a more compelling way to document this process would be to convey only the trace of the ash. The most natural way of doing this appeared to be the photogram which, since photography's inception, has been used as a way of conveying universal truths not immediately perceptible to the naked eye. This involved scattering my grandfather's remains directly onto a roll of photographic paper one metre wide and exposing them to light in the darkroom. Once exposed, the shadows cast by my Grandfather's remains appear as stars against an inky black sky. From the remains of the body, I attempt to reassemble a primordial unity with the cosmos in which each speck of dust comes to symbolise the Moons of Saturn, supernovae, asteroids, galaxies and planets of which we are all derived.

Here my interest lay in using photography to elevate a finite subject matter such as ash to the level of the infinite expanse of space, and hopefully convey Immanuel Kant's belief that all human life is by its very nature sublime, for no infinity in nature or space could ever match the infinite scope of the human mind. Condensing this project into a photobook, Made of Stars, I hope that the viewer may perceive a narrative which traces events from my grandfather's life on a cosmic scale: from the earliest birth pangs of a newborn star to its final collapse into a black hole.

Universal Sympathy (2015) by Alan Knox, courtesy of Daniel Blau Gallery


Are there any photographers or other creatives who have been a particular influence on your work?

My recent practice has been greatly inspired by artists and photographers whose work has explored the theory of the sublime as it relates to the boundary between the finite and infinite. The belief held by Hiroshi Sugimoto that through photography one can raise primordial memories to consciousness has been an immense inspiration whilst working on Universal Sympathy, as I sought to provoke a memory of mankind having originated in the Big Bang.

Whilst studying how the feeling of the sublime has been historically evoked in both art and science, I was fascinated to learn that astronomers at the Hubble Heritage Project were inspired by landscape painters working in the sublime tradition such as Thomas Moran and Albert Bierstadt when composing astronomical images such as the Pillars of Creation. Learning to structure the compositions as you would a landscape helped me to guide the chaotic pattern of ash which formed each time I scattered them on paper.

Made of Stars, Knox's final degree show project, featuring images from Man in the Moon & Universal Sympathy

How would you describe your work, and where do you look for inspiration?

I would describe much of my recent photography practice as conceptual and in this respect, I'm always trying to explore the boundary of the personal and universal. I've always been fascinated by both astronomy and astrology, especially the knowledge that all life originates in the stars, as the astronomer Carl Sagan said, "We are made of starstuff." For photographers such as the 19th century Swedish playwright August Strindberg, the photogram was a space where nature and the heavens collide. Creating so-called celestographs by placing photographic plates face up on the ground where once exposed, Strindberg perceived the grains of dust as a photographic imprint of the skies above.

During my studies I was greatly inspired by conceptual photographers including Sugimoto, Thomas Demand, Joan Fontcuberta, Paul Graham and Thomas Ruff. This past year I've also really enjoyed the work of Peter Watkins, Barry Hughes, Peter Puklus and Aleix Plademunt. Whenever I'm frustrated creatively, I'm always reminded of a quote by the photographer Alex Webb: "If your photographs aren't good enough, you're not reading enough." With this in mind, I try to draw as broad an influence from literature and theory as possible, from T.S Eliot and W.G. Sebald, to Derrida, Adorno, Zizek and Lacan.

Man in the Moon (2014) by Alan Knox. Knox re-photographed large format black-and-white negatives from his family archive, holding images to the sky to be backlit by the reflection of a full moon

And could you tell us a little more about Schengland?

As an art student studying in Scotland during the referendum debate, I felt compelled to document the sea-change in political engagement which was happening during this time. This eventually lead to a landscape project which documented the Anglo-Scots border and the dirt paths which had been established to open access across the border counties. One fear raised by those arguing against independence was that an independent Scotland would lead to the erection of border controls with England should Scotland be forced to join the Schengen zone as a condition of EU membership. Trailing Google Street View's imagery of the eastern European Schengen border with non EU nations, I was fascinated to see border checkpoints still operating in a similar geography to the one I had been photographing in the Borders region

Designing mock road signs pasted with blown up screen grabs of Street View imagery from the eastern European Schengen border and installed on the pathways between Scotland and England, I hoped to illustrate the consequences of European integration on calls for greater regional sovereignty which the independence referendum debate exposed, whilst further highlighting internet imagery's often contentious role in documenting border relations.

Schengland

You've been selected as one of Daniel Blau's 5 under 30. What impact has being selected, and having your work in the gallery, had so far?

Exhibiting at the Daniel Blau Gallery alongside Julia Parks, Melissa Arras and Michael Radford and has been both an honour and an invaluable experience in learning how commercial galleries work with photographers. The most humbling response I've received so far is when people have told me that viewing the images has had a healing effect following their own experience with bereavement. I was relieved to discover during the exhibition that others found solace in a project which was originally so personal to me. Whilst I had considered the work resolved, exhibiting the images publicly has inspired me to find new ways to continue the project.

You've also taken part in a number of group shows. How useful has this been for you, in terms of making contacts, or getting exposure for your work?

Taking part in group shows has been very important in forming contacts with exhibitors and other photographers. Entering Schengland as part of the open call for the European Prospects: Celebrating Europe group exhibition at Kaunas Photo Gallery in Lithuania allowed me to attend portfolio reviews with industry specialists and professional photographers from across Europe, and after seeing Schengland exhibited in Lithuania, Malcolm Dickson, the director of StreetLevel Photoworks in Glasgow, invited me to exhibit as part of Carlisle Photo Festival and give talks on the project. These are experiences I'm very grateful for. Photography can often be quite a lonely pursuit so taking part in group shows has been great way to make contacts with other photographers who inspire you to continue working on personal projects.

Schengland

What are you plans and hopes for the future now you've finished university?

In August I will exhibit in Futureproof alongside other recent photography graduates from Scottish art schools and colleges at the Peacock Visual Arts gallery in Aberdeen. I recently completed an internship at the Financial Times which gave me the opportunity to shoot editorial photography for special reports. This was an experience I really enjoyed and an area where I hope to gain more experience in the future. I also really enjoyed the process of making a photobook and I'm hoping to be able to publish Made of Stars in a larger print run.

And are you working on anything at the moment?

I'm currently working on a conceptual documentary project called Uncanny Valley, exploring the village of New Lanark in the Clyde Valley. During the 19th century the village became world famous as one of the earliest examples of a fully functioning, socialist utopian community. Today it survives as a thriving tourist site and my interest lies in documenting how the village's world heritage site status affects the residents for whom this symbol of a bygone utopian ideal is simply called home.


Alan Knox is also featured in CR's Talent Spotting project, in association with Creative Translation, that will put work by 20 graduates on over 1,000 JCDecaux digital screens across the UK throughout August.

See more of his work here.

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Nick Deakin's cheerful designs for Sheffield Children's Hospital http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/sheffield-childrens-hospital http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/july/sheffield-childrens-hospital#feedback Tue, 28 Jul 2015 11:48:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=91813

Illustrator and designer Nick Deakin has created a new series of murals for the eye department at Sheffield Children's Hospital, which aim to brighten up treatment rooms and make clinical assessments less daunting. Deakin's artworks are the latest in a series commissioned for the hospital by Artfelt, and form part of a wider plan to transform its patient spaces using art and design.

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Illustrator and designer Nick Deakin has created a new series of murals for the eye department at Sheffield Children's Hospital, which aim to brighten up treatment rooms and make clinical assessments less daunting. Deakin's artworks are the latest in a series commissioned for the hospital by Artfelt, and form part of a wider plan to transform its patient spaces using art and design.

Deakin's illustrations have been applied to 14 rooms in the department. Each features a colourful modular design with a different theme, from space to the park and the beach. In some rooms, illustrations also help with clinical assessments artwork on the ceiling in orthoptic rooms provide images to look at during eye examinations while light boxes in dark corridors, inspired by the Snellen charts used in eye tests, feature interchangeable illustrations printed on acetate.

Deakin says his illustrations are designed to appeal to both adults and children: "I like to make things as simple as possible, but with a layer of meaning so that it appeals to both kids and adults," he says. "The idea was to create something modular, that could be drawn upon across the different spaces which were at times small and intricate ... we decided upon using a group of friends as our characters, and worked with that as the theme."

Artfelt manager Cat Powell says the artwork was designed to transform the space from somewhere "that could feel quite claustrophobic" into "a bright, airy department". She also plans to launch a range of merchandise with Deakin which can be sold to raise money for Artfelt.

The project is the latest in a series commissioned by Artfelt, which aim to make the hospital's spaces more welcoming and provide visual distractions for young patients. It has also commissioned illustrations for a swimming room at the hospital's Ryegate centre, cheerful photography for its emergency department, traffic themed murals for a neurological assessment block and mosaics, textiles and landscape paintings for the critical care unit.

The group also holds regular exhibitions in a dedicated gallery space, which is currently displaying work by screen printing artist Florence Blanchard, and recently commissioned over 200 artists to salvage toys used to test young children's hearing, which were going to be thrown away after their manufacturer went out of business. The group regularly works with local artists and designers, and runs weekly art workshops for children facing long stays or operations.

We've covered several arts projects in hospitals in the past from the brilliant work Vital Arts has been doing for the Royal London Children's Hospital and Barts Health NHS Trust, to plans to transform the new Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool with 3D installations and artistic commissions (you can read Mark Sinclair's in-depth feature on the subject in our April issue, which looks at creativity in healthcare).

It's great to see artistic commissions becoming more commonplace in hospitals and treatment rooms around the UK, and to see hospitals investing in art and design to help relieve stress and improve patient wellbeing. The Children's Hospital Charity, which Artfelt is part of, is currently trying to raise £20 million to improve Sheffield Children's Hospital's increasingly cramped and dated waiting rooms and plans to build a new patient garden, as well as making the hospital "brighter, more child friendly and designed with children in mind".

Artfelt says it has yet to quantify the effect of its arts programme on patients, but is looking to conduct research in the near future, and has had positive feedback on installations and exhibitions from several patients, parents and staff. Theatre admissions manager Jackie Sanderson also claims art workshops prior to surgery time have helped reduce the need to put children under general anaesthetic, adding: "The workshops help to alleviate anxieties and stress from children prior to theatre. I think that the workshops actually negate the need for sedation in some children. [With the workshops], the waiting time prior to going to theatre can be fun."

For more info about Artfelt or the Children's Hospital Charity's work, see tchc.org.uk

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