CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:02:52 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 Ten years of button badges http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/stereohype-2004-14 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/stereohype-2004-14#feedback Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:52:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82361

Ten years ago this month, London t-shirt and badge label Stereohype launched its first annual button badge design competition. With an exhibition of over 1000 submissions on display at LCC and a new monograph on the project just published, we asked co-founder Tomi Vollauschek about visual trends in badge design, and whether it's still a popular medium for graphic artists.

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Ten years ago this month, London t-shirt and badge label Stereohype launched its first annual button badge design competition. With an exhibition of over 1000 submissions on display at LCC and a new monograph on the project just published, we asked co-founder Tomi Vollauschek about visual trends in badge design, and whether it's still a popular medium for graphic artists.

Stereohype was founded as an experimental offshoot of Vollauschek and Agathe Jacquillat’s London design studio FL@33 in 2004, and sells t-shirts and badges designed by new and established artists. Each year, it runs an online badge design competition, judged by an industry panel, with winning contributions sold via the label’s website.

Vollauschek and Jacquillat also add their own designs to the site, as well as an annual 'By Invitation Only' series. Over 1000 designs are now featured in an exhibition at London College of Communication - one of three shows launched at the college during London Design Festival (see our blog post on them here) - and a monograph, Stereohype: 2004-2014.



As an introduction to the monograph notes, badges have been a popular medium of expression since the invention of celluloid in the late 1890s. Over the years, they have been used to communicate political ideologies, promote good causes and display allegiances to bands, brands or clubs and as they are easy and cheap to produce, have long been popular with designers, artists and illustrators.

Stereohype's exhibition at LCC

“It’s a fantastic medium” adds Vollauschek. “We call them mobile mini canvases but really, they have more in common with a poster design or stamp than a painting. The core message for example – if there is one to communicate – must be delivered directly and appropriately. As fashion accessories they are of course amazing, too, as you can playfully add and change them according to mood and occasion,” he says.

Button badges aren't quite as popular today as they were in the 1970s and 80s, during the height of the DIY punk aesthetic, but they're still sold at major galleries, from the Tate to the Wellcome Collection, and Stereohype continues to receive hundreds of submissions to its competition each year.

“Fashions come and go, of course, and demand has had its ups and downs, but one thing we learned about selling badges over a period of ten years is that people never seem to grow tired of button badges, and happily reward themselves, friends and family with these cute little wearable artworks,” he says.

The label's all-time most popular designs, however - Richard J Kirk’s Sorry I’m Late; FL@33’s VIP and Shen Plum’s Coloured Mesh (below) - are from one of its earliest series.

While designs vary enormously each year, Vollauschek says there are some recurring motifs: “Eyes, buttons and of course skulls never go out of fashion. Cats and dogs are very popular, so are references to tea and/or coffee drinking – no surprise then, that Monika Mitkute’s badge of a cat holding a mug (below) is one of our best sellers," he says.
“Overall, a trend towards the extra-silly and rougher doodle like designs seems to be increasingly popular, and comfortably stands its ground next to slicker visual executions and more minimal, conceptual designs."

One of Vollauschek's favourite designs is Jody Barton's I Hate Dolphins - "I am still fascinated by it, as it offends pretty much everybody," he adds.

For this year’s B.I.O. series, Stereohype invited Caetano Calomino, Dina Silanteva, Emmi Salonen, Henrik Birkvig, Julian Morey, Matthew Kenyon, Neringa Plange, Paul Jenkins, Russell Weekes, Sawdust, Studio Gpop, Tara Hanrahan and Tower Block Books aka Amandine Alessandra and Rute Nieto Ferreira to submit badges (you can see the full set here).

Badge designs by Tower Block Books, Matthew Kenyon, Paul Jenkins, Sawdust, Russell Weekes Caeteno Calomino and Studio Gpop for Stereohype's B.I.O. 14 series

The label also commissioned ten creatives to design a badge and poster to celebrate its anniversary, inspired by the number 10 and/or 1000, or 10x10. The collection includes designs by Daniel Eatock, Deanne Cheuk, Jacquillat, Genevieve Gauckler, Ian Wright, Michael C Place, Richard J Kirk, TwoPoints and Vaughan Oliver. A1 prints are available in editions of 10, priced at £350 each.

Designs by Alan Kitching, Vaughan Oliver, Deanne Cheuk, Ian Wright and TwoPoints (see here for the full set)

While larger runs of its badges are manufactured abroad, Stereohype still produces limited editions in-house, using the same machine it set up shop with. This year, its annual competition is open to visitors to the exhibition, who are invited to submit hand-drawn designs manually via a ballot box, but next year's will again be held online, and Stereohype is launching a new website later this year to better showcase its collection. “The anniversary show certainly encouraged us to continue extending our collection,” adds Vollauschek.

Stereohype 2004-2014 is on display at LCC until October 31. The monograph is priced at £10. For details, see stereohype.com.

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Catch London's bus art sculpture trail http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/bus-sculpture-trail http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/bus-sculpture-trail#feedback Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:21:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82359

2014 is the Year of the Bus in London, with a range of activities promoting and celebrating bus use. The latest addition is the Year of the Bus Sculpture Trail featuring work from 40 illustrators and artists

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2014 is the Year of the Bus in London, with a range of activities promoting and celebrating bus use. The latest addition is the Year of the Bus Sculpture Trail featuring work from 40 illustrators and artists

 

London Takes the Bus by Rod Hunt and in situ, above and below. Hunt says ""I found inspiration by looking at the Key Bus Routes in central London map & seeing that it almost looks like the map is spelling the word 'Bus' in the route lines." Vinyl wrap by The Graphical Tree

 

 

The Graphical Tree team working on Hunt's sculpture

 


 

Produced with Wild in Art (whose we book benches we previously featured here) the sculptures are sited in three areas of the city – Westminster, along the river and around the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Visitors can download maps here to discover them all

They are all based on the form of the new Routemaster and are are 2.5m long, 1m high and 0.5m wide

 

Come Rain or Shine by Thomas Dowdeswell

 

London Telephone Bus by Stephen McKay


 

Queen's Conductor (Busby) by Oliver Dean


 

Spectrum by Kristel Pillkahn


 

Routemasters by Edward Carvalho-Monaghan


 

Ding by Crispin Finn


 

Dazzler by Sophie Green

 

The sculptures, which are all funded by sponsorship, will be on display until December, after which they will be auctioned to raise funds for three charities: Kids Company, Transaid and London Transport Museum.

 

 

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Actis launches photography exhibition for tenth anniversary http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/actis-vantage-point http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/actis-vantage-point#feedback Mon, 20 Oct 2014 11:20:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82326

To celebrate its tenth anniversary, private equity company Actis commissioned photographer Harry Cory Wright to capture the communities, projects and businesses the company has invested in worldwide. His photos, taken using a large format plate camera, are on display in a touring exhibition and book designed by London studio Rose.

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Entebbe, Uganda

To celebrate its tenth anniversary, private equity company Actis commissioned photographer Harry Cory Wright to capture the communities, projects and businesses the company has invested in worldwide. His photos, taken using a nineteenth century plate camera, are now on display in a touring exhibition and book designed by London studio Rose.

A Vantage Point features photographs of a vast range of people, places and projects; from a tea estate in Mukono, Uganda to a hair salon in Mumbai and Johannesburg's Nelson Mandela Bridge. The series offers a fascinating look at changing infrastructures, rural communities and local businesses, as well as promoting the company's work in emerging markets.

George Goch-Johannesburg-Naledi Railway, S Africa

"The idea was very simple: to try and represent the breadth of the company's work, which is very diverse, and shape that into a show," explains Cory Wright. "It was important to represent the key markets [the company invests in India, Africa, China, Latin America and South East Asia] and key sectors but most importantly, the set had to work as a series ... we wanted each image to capture not just the investment, but the life around it," he adds.

Based in Norfolk, Cory Wright is best known for his landscape photography, such as Journey Through the British Isles, a series documenting the British countryside. His series for Actis, however, features a mix of portraits and still lifes, from close-ups of industrial machinery to scenes of chaotic cities, building sites, busy restaurants and medical centres.

"It's quite different to the photography used in a lot of our branding, which is more people based [often featuring close-up portraits], but every picture tells a story," says Actis chairman Paul Fletcher.

A picture of a jeweller outside his shop in Cairo, for example (below) represents the swathe of businesses in emerging markets switching from cash payments to card in a growing economy, while one of a family outside their home in rural Uganda (top) represents investments in the electricity poles and cables supplying power to the area. Insulated cables make it more difficult to tap into the power supply, while reducing the risk of death or serious injury when attempting to do so.

7 Days Inn, Beijing

Emerging Markets Payments, El Beeb jewellers, Cairo

Cory Wright travelled to India, China, Africa and Brazil to shoot the series, spending around two weeks in each country he visited. "I didn't have to report back much [while shooting] - Actis put a lot of faith in me," he says. “It’s quite an unusual project for them - and for me, having that level of freedom and no art director around - but they realised that if you allow people to just do their thing, the result is ten times better than it would be otherwise."

The full set of over 60 images is compiled in a book, designed by Rose, which will be sent out to Actis' key clients. Twenty-one have also been reproduced as large scale prints for an exhibition curated by Nicola Bunbury.

Investments in tractors, ATM machines and electronic payment systems may not seem like compelling subject matter for a photography series, but Cory Wright has captured some beautifully detailed scenes that offer a real snapshot of life in the areas where Actis invests.

Byculla Pharmacy & Stores, Mumbai

Images were shot on a large format plate camera, which Cory Wright has been using for over 20 years. "It's very slow, and expensive [the cost of film and processing is around £50 per shot] but it's very good at dealing with place and space - it affords everything a relevance in the picture," he says.

"It's very easy to compose in a way, as such a large screen, but [with this kind of camera], it's not so much about the precision of how you take the picture. You can only ever get the notion of something – you can never read the scene closely when you’re there – so you just rely on what the camera will reveal later. It’s a very pleasing process. You know when the film comes back there’s going to be all this other stuff in the scene that you hadn’t thought about," he adds.

One of the biggest challenges during the project, however, was transporting the camera and film, explains Cory Wright. "The biggest concern was travelling through airport security - as there was no guarantee the film would survive X Ray scanners [which can damage unprocessed images]. After travelling to India we had to come back to the UK, have pictures developed and restock with film before we went to China," he says.

Following a display at London's Saatchi Gallery this week, the exhibition will travel to Sao Paulo later this month, before visiting Mumbai, Beijing and Johannesburg.

Super-Max, Precious Hair Cutting Salon, Mumbai

Heritage Place, Lagos

Banque Commerciale du Rwanda, Kigali

 

Spread showing image of tea estate in Mukono, Uganda

Jeffreys Bay Wind Farm, Easter Cape

Exhibition invitations designed by Rose, who also created the identity and graphics for the show

Images on display at the Saatchi Gallery in London last week

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I've fallen and I can't get up http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/dave-fothergill-miarmy-fallen-cant-get-up http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/dave-fothergill-miarmy-fallen-cant-get-up#feedback Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:15:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82339

There's something undeniably compelling about this test footage by VFX artist Dave Fothergill which sees a few hundred CG souls unleashed into the path of a spinning block. Demonstrating the power of Miarmy, some of the runners make it through, but most trip, fall down and, well, wiggle around...

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There's something undeniably compelling about this test footage by VFX artist Dave Fothergill which sees a few hundred CG souls unleashed into the path of a spinning block. Demonstrating the power of Miarmy, some of the runners make it through, but most trip, fall down and, well, wiggle around...

Fothergill is senior VFX artist at CG house RealtimeUK and uploaded the 'crowd dynamics' test clip to Vimeo a few days ago. According to his post, it uses Maya's Miarmy and "shows the new 'servo force' feature which allows struggling animation once the agent has become dynamic".

Miarmy is, as the name suggests, a plugin specifically designed for crowd simulation, AI and "behavioral animation". And Fothergill's clip is full of lovely detail which add to the cruel realism: the way the approaching crowd ready themselves for the run, oblivious to the odds stacked against them and the will of their human overlord, is almost heart-breaking. And check out the fate of the last man to run – classic.

Fothergill's 44-second test was rendered with Arnold.

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AOI Illustration Awards 2014 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/aoi-illustration-awards-2014 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/aoi-illustration-awards-2014#feedback Fri, 17 Oct 2014 17:10:00 +0000 Antonia Wilson http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82295

There's some wonderful work on show at Somerset House this month as part of the AOI Illustration Awards 2014. Here are some the winning images and other highlights from the shortlisted work...

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There's some wonderful work on show at Somerset House this month as part of the AOI Illustration Awards 2014. Here are some the winning images and other highlights from the shortlisted work...

The Awards are open to illustrators around the world, working in any medium, and are assessed by judges from the industry, including commissioners, publishers and artists. Overall Professional and New Talent winners are selected from a shortlist of winning work across eight categories - Books, Children's Books, Self Initiated, Advertising & Design, Editorial, Public Realm, Research & Knowledge Communication, and Research & Knowledge Communication.

We love the elusive, smug little bird (above) in Chris Haughton's SHH We have a plan, which won the Children's Books Category (Professional).

 

Charlotte Halsey created a 3D piece called Wandering in Circles (Part Two) from 3000 individually hand cut paper curls (New Talent, Self-Initiated). The delicate detail in her work is mesmerising. (Pictured above)

Also shortlisted in Self Initiated, was Michael Parkin's screenprint Where There's A Will There's A Whale. (Pictured below)

And Aaron Meshon's pen and ink Brooklyn! map won the Self Initiated category (Professional). (Pictured below)

Jasu Hu was the New Talent winner in the Advertising and Design category with this series for World's End Clothes, inspired by the architecture of Louis Kahn. (Pictured above)

Andy Ward's series of posters for a mental health campaign for the University of California's Santa Cruz campus, was the Professional winner this category. It certainly answers the client's request for a "no holds barred assult on the eye with a 100% artificial colouring approach"). (Pictured above)

What's not to love about an owl in 3D glasses... as seen in Jonathan Burton's poster for the Athens Open Air Film Festival (shortlisted for Advertising & Design, Professional). (Pictured above)

Also from Burton, a series of surreal illustrations for Douglas Adams' Life, the Universe and Everything, commissioned by The Folio Society, which was shortlisted for the Books category (Professional). (Pictured above)

And winning in the Books category for New Talent was Katie Ponder for her dark collage series The Rite of Spring, inspired by Stravinsky's music of the same name. (Pictured below)

Winning the overall Professional Award and in the Books category, was Geoff Grandfield's illustrations for Mary Renault's set of historical novels The Alexander Trilogy, created using chalk pastel on printmaking paper. (Pictured below)

And winning the overall New Talent award, and in the Children's Books category (New Talent), was William Grill for his beautiful colour pencil illustrations for Shakleton's Journey, reinterpreting a historical expedition for a younger audience. (Pictured below)

Prosopagnosia by Johanna Roehr won the New Talent Award in the Research & Knowledge Communication category, illustrating a condition also understood as 'face blindness', where the ability to recognise faces is impaired. This is part of an on-going project by Roehr, called dis•order: A Visual Dictionary of Curious Neurological Phenomena. (Pictured below)

David Doran, won in the Editorial category, for New Talent, for his commission for The New York Times Book Review, which accompanied a review of Dennis Bock's novel, Going Home Again. (Pictured above).

And Fabricating Art, by Laurindo Feliciano, for Flaunt magazine won in this category for Professional. (Pictured below)

The shortlist for this category also included this political illustration called Cameron's Cuntry, by Paolo Fiore (New Talent), complete with Fiore's take on Cameron's campaign poster. (Pictured below)

It's well worth checking out all the shortlisted work on the AOI website, and there's also an exhibtion of selected work on at Somerset House in London, until November 2.

This includes some great work from the shortlist for the Children's Books category, including Yeji Yun's fishy characters for the ancient Korean folk tale The Rabbit and the Dragon King, Zoom Zoom Zoom by Katherina Manolessou, and some awesome infographics in Grundini: Body Book by Peter Grundy. (All shortlisted for the Professional award, pictured below, top-bottom).

www.theaoi.com

www.somersethouse.org.uk

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Will you be getting wood at D&AD next year? http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/wood-graphite-dad http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/wood-graphite-dad#feedback Fri, 17 Oct 2014 15:16:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82332

D&AD has introduced two new pencils to its awards line-up for 2015: wood and graphite. They will replace the old In Book and Nomination designations

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D&AD has introduced two new pencils to its awards line-up for 2015: wood and graphite. They will replace the old In Book and Nomination designations

D&AD's awards system has always been somewhat confusing for the uninitiated. Whereas other systems stick to gold, silver and bronze, D&AD's silvers were actually yellow and its golds, black.

In addition, work selected for inclusion in the annual (so-called In Book) was itself deemed to be award-winning, as was work which received the further accolade of being nominated for a pencil - whether yellow or black.

In an attempt to make things clearer, for 2015 D&AD is introducing a wood pencill and a graphite one, so if you get in the annual you'll also receive a trophy.

So, just to be clear, In Book is wood, Nominated is graphite, silver is yellow, gold is black and, er, white is white. And the President's Awards is gold. Clear? Well, there isn't a clear... yet.

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Bibliotheque is ten http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/bibliotheque-10 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/bibliotheque-10#feedback Fri, 17 Oct 2014 14:39:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82325

To mark its tenth anniversary, design studio Bibliothèque has curated a three-day exhibition including a reading room of the partners' favourite books, rare print items and an installation which remixes its output to date

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To mark its tenth anniversary, design studio Bibliothèque has curated a three-day exhibition including a reading room of the partners' favourite books, rare print items and an installation which remixes its output to date

Tim Beard, Mason Wells (who had previously worked together at North) and Jonathan Jeffrey (ex-Farrow) formed Bibliothèque in 2004. CR was one of the first to report on their work and ideas for the future with a major feature in our March 2004 issue. For the cover, Bibliothèque rigged up a camera on the ceiling of their studio to create a tiled image of the space

 

Since then, they have gone on to work for clients including Paul Smith, The Design Museum, Nike, Adidas, Google, the V&A and Vitsoe, with whom they have a longstanding relationship.

Some of the work produced for these clients is featured in Reset, described as a installation which reinterprets the studio's work and celebrating "the past 10 years in anticipation of the next 10". Visitors to the installation, which is at The Hoxton Arches from October 17 to 19, caninteract with the piece using 'alarm' style push buttons mounted on the wall of the gallery

 

Also featured in the show is Bibliothèque's Bibliothèque, described as "a book shop of the studio's curated reading list from Artwords, some hard to find publications, and a selection of rarities from the studio's collection". Plus, there will be coffee provided by Climpson & Sons.

The event is at Hoxton Arches, Arch 402 Cremer Street, London E2 8HD. More details here

 

 

 

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Bus Stop Not in Use, but sign now in use as bag http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/keith-gray-bus-stop-not-in-use-bags http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/keith-gray-bus-stop-not-in-use-bags#feedback Fri, 17 Oct 2014 11:56:00 +0000 Mark Sinclair http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82304

Transport for London's 'Bus Stop Not in Use' signs inevitably cause some level of frustration for the capital's bus passengers, but designer Keith Gray has reworked these messages of disruption into a series of courier-style bags...

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Transport for London's 'Bus Stop Not in Use' signs inevitably cause some level of frustration for the capital's bus passengers, but designer Keith Gray has reworked these messages of disruption into a series of courier-style bags...

Gray's latest project for TfL reworks one of the bus network's most infamous signs – the 'flag' which is placed over the top of a bus stop when it is temporarily closed.

"A couple of years ago I found a Bus Stop Not In Use sleeve discarded on a pavement in Hackney," Gray explains. "At the time I needed a portfolio bag to take my screenprints to and from Printclub – it was an ideal size, so I reconstructed it to be of use in that way."

According to Gray, the Not In Use sleeve has two open sides, so he attached a heavy duty zip to these and designed two 'webbing' straps into the construction, so it could then be carried over the shoulders – particularly handy when travelling by bike.

"I then took it to TfL and they liked it so much that they put it into production as a celebratory project for their 'Year of the Bus' initiative that kicked off last month at Design Junction," he adds.

"I like the idea of taking something used as signage for something that is out of use – a bus stop – and transforming the 'dis-used' into 'useful'. It's a kind of positive spin on a 'Bus Stop Product Recall', if you like."

In 2003, Gray was one of CR's Creative Futures. For that year's scheme each recipient was given a window in Selfridges in London to install a project: Gray's idea was to produce a graphic representation of the noise pollution outside the store.

In 2010 he produced the set of alternative commemorative plates for the wedding of Prince William & Kate Middleton while at KesselsKramer in London. More recently he published Product Recall, a book of 'product recall notices'.

Bus stop is not in use bags are priced at £45 each and will be available to purchase online from winter 2014 from shop.tfl.gov.uk. More of Gray's work at pagefailedtoload.com.


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Scotland's Graphic Design Festival http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/graphic-design-festival-scotland http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/graphic-design-festival-scotland#feedback Fri, 17 Oct 2014 10:40:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82317

Scotland's first annual Graphic Design Festival takes place in Glasgow next week, with a five-day programme of hands-on events that aim to help connect young creatives with industry. Here's a look at the line-up, plus we have one ticket to a two-day workshop with Eike Konig to give away...

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Scotland's first annual Graphic Design Festival takes place in Glasgow next week, with a five-day programme of hands-on events that aim to help connect young creatives with industry. Here's a look at the line-up, plus we have one ticket to a two-day workshop with Hort's Eike König to give away...

Graphic Design Festival Scotland runs from October 22-26 and was organised by Gilchrist and Beth Wilson. The pair, who also run Glasgow design studio Warriors, came up with the idea while studying at the University of Edinburgh.

"There are so many successful design festivals abroad and a lot of events going on down South. With so many students, creative studios and great universities [in Scotland], we just thought, 'why shouldn't there be one here?'" explains Gilchrist.

Rather than a traditional programme of talks and exhibitions, Gilchrist and Wilson have opted for a more collaborative model, which aims to showcase local talent and help young designers network with established studios.

The programme begins with a live two-day project, in which a group of creatives selected from online applications before the festival will be given a conceptual brief and asked to create a piece of work individually.

Participants will work independently but will be grouped together, with each group receiving advice from a mentoring studio or designer throughout the project. Mentors include Graphical House, Freytag Anderson, O Street and Edinburgh creative agency Touch.

Freytag Anderson's branding for The Fableists

Graphical House branding for Scotland Can Make It!

At the end of the event, work will be judged by a panel from INT Works and Grafik and winners from each team will receive a work placement with their mentor studio. They'll also get a 'Best up-and-coming 2014' award and a bundle of prizes.

"[The live event] is all about giving designers a chance to showcase their work and have it reviewed. Everyone will be working independently but in an open-plan space and mentors will give one-on-one advice throughout," explains Gilchrist. "We'll also feature the students and young designers who took part on our website," he adds.

Following the live project are a series of one and two-day workshops: one day events are priced at £80, two-day at £160, and prices include a free ticket to the festival launch party on October 24 and an informal talks night on October 25.

Freddy Taylor of KesselsKramer and riso printing studio Risotto will be holding workshops

Workshops range from risograph printing with local studio Risotto, animation with STV Creative and hands-on 'construction based' projects with Berlin arts collective 44flavours.

Hort's Eike König will also be running a print workshop, OK-RM will focus on type and print, and KesselsKramer designer Freddy Taylor's will be based around a conceptual product.

"We wanted to feature a good selection of home-grown talent and international studios," explains Gilchrist. "The one and two-day workshops will follow the same concept, but the two-day ones from international studios will be more comprehensive, focusing on developing an idea as well as creating something physical," he adds.

This year's programme also includes an exhibition at In Public Gallery featuring shortlisted entries to an international poster design competition held by the festival earlier this year.

The exhibition was curated by Felix Pfaffli, Pierre Vanni, Morgan Fortems (founder of My Monkey gallery in France) and Warriors, and selected from over 3000 entries. Winners will be announced at a launch night on October 24 and you can see shortlisted names here.

To celebrate the launch of the festival, Graphic Design Festival Scotland has given us one ticket to a two-day workshop with Eike König on October 25 and 26th, worth £160. To win, simply leave your best design-punning movie title in the comments section below and remember to include your name and email address alongside your answer.

The competition closes at midnight tonight and the winner will be notified by midday on October 20th.

For more information on the festival or to book tickets for events, see graphicdesignfestivalscotland.com

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Your Life On Earth http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/your-life-on-earth http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/october/your-life-on-earth#feedback Thu, 16 Oct 2014 15:34:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=82297

Ever wondered how many times your heart has beaten in your lifetime? Or how much the world's sea level has risen? Now you can find out, thanks to a great interactive data visualisation by Information is Beautiful promoting BBC Earth's new website.

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Ever wondered how many times your heart has beaten in your lifetime? Or how much the world's sea level has risen? Now you can find out, thanks to a great interactive data visualisation by Information is Beautiful promoting BBC Earth's new website.

The interactive, which launched today and has already proved popular on Twitter, asks visitors to enter their height, gender and date of birth before presenting them with a dashboard of stats relating to their time on earth.

The first section, How you have changed, lists facts about users’ age on different planets, how many times their heart has beaten and how many generations of family an animal the same age would have had.

The second, How the world has changed, lists environmental changes and events in users’ lifetimes – from solar eclipses to major earthquakes and population increase – while the third reflects on changes humans have made to the world.

In the 25 years since I was born, 232.5 million hectares of forest has been lost and the Antarctic ozone hole has increased by 11 million km², but it’s not all bad - black rhinos were saved from extinction and the global supply of beer per person has increased.



At the bottom of the page, a section titled ‘How the BBC captured it all’ plays a selection of clips from BBC Earth shows past and present, from Planet Earth to Big Cat Diaries.

As well as being fun, easy to use and educational, it’s a clever way of promoting the BBC’s new site and showcasing archived content. The visualisation also makes some serious comments on global warming, endangered species and natural resources.

“Matt Walker [editor for BBC Earth] came up with the concept of doing something looking back in time, and we had the idea of this dashboard style presentation,” explains Duncan Swain, creative partner at Information is Beautiful.

"We really wanted to structure it around three key strands: how humanity has changed, how our world has changed and man's impact on earth, which I think encapsulates [BBC Earth's] content,” he adds.

The interactive took around three months to create, with a team of 12 including developers, researchers and editorial staff. “There was a variety of different components to the process – coming up with the concept itself and what we wanted to portray through the data, followed by the research, which we did in-house, the sketching phase and finally, the design,” says Swain. “Every individual element had to be carefully considered – from the titles of each box to the text that appears when you Tweet it.”

The site contains over 20 visualisations and most have variables - as well as viewing how the population has changed in their lifetime, users can view life expectancy, or see the number of volcanic eruptions instead of earthquakes. They can also choose from a drop down list of planets when checking their space age, or creatures that have been discovered since they were born.



The design of the dashboard reflects BBC Earth’s new branding, which is now more in line with the broadcaster's digital iwonder service, though Swain says some adjustments had to be made as the interactive was built on a different platform.

The most complicated aspect of the process, he says, was clearly communicating complex data without oversimplifying the facts. “We didn’t want to trivialise things, or they could end up just coming out wrong, so you’re walking that tight rope between making it easy to understand whilst still being accurate,” he explains.

“Another challenge was researching historical data – it was quite difficult to get hold of some things, and correlate them with today’s data, making sure all of the calculations and algorithms were correct."

Try the site for yourself here.

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