CR Blog http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog News and views on visual communications from the writers of Creative Review Tue, 03 Mar 2015 16:41:29 +0000 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/ en http://www.creativereview.co.uk/layout/img/crlogo_small.gifCR Blog     http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog1616 The GAYTMs are back! http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/the-gaytms-are-back http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/the-gaytms-are-back#feedback Tue, 03 Mar 2015 16:45:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86833

Last year, Australian bank ANZ caused a stir with its makeover of a selection of cash points in Sydney in celebration of the Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras in the city. Following the massive success of this first campaign, the GAYTMs are back again this year, with more elaborate designs and even music...

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Last year, Australian bank ANZ caused a stir with its makeover of a selection of cash points in Sydney in celebration of the Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras in the city. Following the massive success of this first campaign, the GAYTMs are back again this year, with more elaborate designs and even music...

The campaign is the brainchild of ANZ and its agency Whybin/TBWA Melbourne, with the design of the GAYTMs created by artistic collective The Glue Society. Last year's campaign was a massive hit with the public, and went on to pick up the Outdoor Grand Prix in Cannes, so for this year, the challenge was how to create something as eye-catching the second time around.

To do this, James Dive and Pete Baker of The Glue Society have moved on from rhinestones – the dominant material used to decorate the ATMs in 2014 – and created a series of elaborate 3D designs, made from thousands of individual laser cut pieces, which have all been constructed by hand. The designs light up at night (see film below), and motion detectors set off music when someone withdraws money.

"The process was achingly exacting," says Dive. "There were over 30,000 individually cut pieces that had to be assembled by hand. An enormous jigsaw puzzle basically."

"Our challenge was to build on the success of last year's installations and take the concept to a new level artistically," says Baker. "That meant introducing new materials, breaking the confines of the canvas and introducing features like light and sound."

ANZ has been a major sponsor of the Sydney Mardi Gras since 2007, and as with last year's GAYTMs, all the operating fees from the machines (which are standard in Australia if using a teller machine from a bank other than your own to take out cash) will be donated to Twenty10, a non-profit gay and lesbian charity. And again like last year, the machines will feature rainbow receipts.

New for this year though is the 'only GAYTM in the village', where a GAYTM will be installed in a rural town voted for by the public, with the winner being the town of Daylesford, Victoria.

Credits:
Agency: Whybin\TBWA Melbourne
Creatives: Paul Reardon, Tara Ford, Daniel Pizzato
Project and artistic directors: James Dive, Pete Baker, The Glue Society
Production: Will O'Rourke

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Designers use Everyday Things to promote Earth Hour 2015 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/do-the-green-thing http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/do-the-green-thing#feedback Tue, 03 Mar 2015 14:09:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86817

To promote Earth Hour 2015 - a global lights-out event to raise awareness of climate change - WWF and environmental charity Do the Green Thing have commissioned designers and artists to create a series of products using everyday objects. Inventions include a functioning paper record player and some charming robot toys made out of stencils...

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To promote Earth Hour 2015 - a global lights-out event to raise awareness of climate change - WWF and environmental charity Do the Green Thing have commissioned designers and artists to create a series of products using waste and everyday objects. Inventions include a functioning paper record player and some charming robot toys made out of stencils...

Earth Hour takes place at 8.30pm local time on March 28, with residents asked to switch off their lights for one hour. To raise awareness of the event online, WWF and Do the Green Thing have launched Everyday Things - a collection of inventive objects made out of household or discarded items which aim to encourage recycling and more sustainable living.

A new object will be posted on social media each day from tomorrow until Earth Hour day and include a vase constructed from a coat hanger and a discarded wine glass by Daniel Weil (pictured top); a screen-printed tea towel by David Shrigley:

Lights made from waste found on a Hawaiian beach by the RSA's Sophie Thomas:

A working record player made from paper by Simon Elvins:

And some charming stencils by Hudson-Powell, which can be used to turn unwanted cardboard boxes into toy robots.

The project follows poster campaigns in 2013 and 2014, when a new poster promoting sustainable living was released online each day for 29 days in the run up to Earth Hour. (Copies of each poster were sold online, with proceeds going to Do the Green Thing).

The charities also launched a competition to accompany the campaign, asking 16-25-year-olds to create a light switch cover promoting sustainable living. The winning design will be posted online later this month.

Photographs of Everyday Things will be posted on social media using the hashtag #EverydayThings #EarthHourUK. For more info on Earth Hour 2015, see wwf.org.uk/earthhour

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OFFSET 2015: schedule and new speakers announced http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/offset-schedule-2015 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/offset-schedule-2015#feedback Tue, 03 Mar 2015 11:06:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86814

Creative conference OFFSET takes place in Dublin this weekend, with three days of talks spanning design, advertising, photography, animation and illustration. The final schedule has just been announced, with new speakers Barber & Osgerby joining Angus Hyland, Ian Anderson, Hey Studio and Grand Budapest Hotel designer Annie Atkins on Friday.

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Creative conference OFFSET takes place in Dublin this weekend, with three days of talks spanning design, advertising, photography, animation and illustration. The final schedule has just been announced, with new speakers Barber & Osgerby joining Angus Hyland, Ian Anderson, Hey Studio and Grand Budapest Hotel designer Annie Atkins on Friday.

OFFSET takes place at Bord Gáis Energy Theatre from March 6-8. Other main stage speakers include designer Matt Willey, The Gentlewoman art director Veronica Ditting and Gothenburg ad agency Forsman & Bodenfors, while a second stage line-up features a look at contemporary magazine culture and the role of design education, as well as Q&As with Anderson, Andy Altmann and Tomi Ungerer.

Day tickets are available here and priced at €70 or €50 with a student promo code.

Three-day tickets are also still available - pro tickets cost €225 or €187 for groups of six or more and student tickets are €135 or €112 for groups.

All delegates will receive a free copy of a monograph by artist and graphic designer Peter Maybury (one of this year's speakers) and Ways&Means, an OFFSET magazine featuring interviews with speakers and articles on their work:

We'll be reporting from the conference daily and you can follow @weloveoffset on Twitter for updates. To buy a ticket or for more info, see iloveoffset.com

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CR March iPad edition: The On-screen issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/cr-march-ipad-the-on-screen-issue http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/cr-march-ipad-the-on-screen-issue#feedback Mon, 02 Mar 2015 16:50:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86788

The March issue of CR, which looks at the world of creativity on-screen, is also available for iPad, where you'll find all the print mag articles and exclusive additional content in Hi Res, our showcase gallery section, and CRTV, with video profiles of creative people, animations and other moving image work from around the world....

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The March issue of CR - which looks at the world of creativity on-screen - is also available for iPad, where you'll find all the print mag articles and exclusive additional content in Hi Res, our showcase gallery section, and CRTV, with video profiles of creative people, animations and other moving image work from around the world....

In Features this month we take a look at event cinema and how theatres and galleries are using it to increase access to the arts, how Vice News is shaking up the news industry, we ask four top ad creative if ads are getting too long, an interview with docu-filmmaker Adam Curtis, how film stars are being brought back to life with VFX, an interview with Wes Anderson's cinematographer Robert Yeoman, a look at motion graphics studio Territory's work for new film Ex Machina, emerging trends in film and TV title design from website Art of the Title, EA Sports' creative director Matt Prior on how the FIFA series is made, and Monument Valley creators ustwo reflect on the game's success.

Plus a Q&A with illustrator Paul Davis, a review of new book Björk: Archives, and not forgetting regular columns from Michael Evamy who looks at the design significance of the Black Standard of IS, Paul Belford who dissects a classic museum poster by Bruno Monguzzi and Daniel Benneworth-Gray who is spending some quality time with LinkedIn and the film Frozen.

In Hi Res you'll find Polish film posters from the BFI special collections currently on show, illustrated ascents from great bike races with Cycling Climbs by Nigel Peake, Evidence by photographer Diana Matar exploring political disappearance, early works from conceptual artist Barbara Kruger from a new show Skarstedt gallery, and from Elivis to Nirvana -  a look inside Rock Covers, a new book tracing the history of rock record sleeve design.

CRTV includes a look at the reimagined cover art for iconic films plus unseen concept art from Criterion, Doug Hindson's beautifully crafted live action animation Disconnect, Jamie Benning interviews Star Wars' puppeteer Toby Philpot, a look at the work of Getty reportage photographer Veronique de Viguerie, a documentary on artist Michael Paul Smith and his photographs created using miniature worlds, and a trippy new music video for Dralms dir. by Ewan Jones Morris.

 

For further info on the CR iPad app or to subscribe, click here.

To submit work for consideration for CRTV or Hi Res, please email antonia.wilson@centaur.co.uk

 

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Penguin launches Little Black Classics series http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/february/penguin-little-black-classics http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/february/penguin-little-black-classics#feedback Mon, 02 Mar 2015 15:11:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86655

To celebrate its 80th birthday, Penguin Books has launched Little Black Classics, a series of 80 titles priced at 80p each. The mini books feature short stories, poetry and dramas drawn from Penguin's wider Classics list and their sleeves have a distinctive, black-and-white design. We talk to Penguin's art director Jim Stoddart about how he devised the series' look...

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To celebrate its 80th birthday, Penguin Books has launched Little Black Classics, a series of 80 titles priced at 80p each. The mini books feature short stories, poetry and dramas drawn from Penguin's wider Classics list and their sleeves have a distinctive, black-and-white design. We talk to Penguin's art director Jim Stoddart about how he devised the series' look...

 

When putting together this new set of books, publishing director Simon Winder was inspired by Penguin's series of mini books created for its 60th birthday, which included 60 books at 60p each, and wanted to replicate this for the 80th birthday. For Stoddart, the first challenge was whether he would be able to deliver the low price for this new set of books.

"I was very excited by the 80p price point but it was questionable whether such a low price was even possible," he says. "I promised we’d find a design that made that budget work. The 1995 series were like mini versions of the regular Penguin Classics at the time and used images on the front covers like the regular editions. But paying picture permissions for our 80 little books was going to break the budget. The covers evolved hand in hand with the idea of the project. As the confinements and ambitions of this project became clear so the design developed to fit."

 

The team decided to focus on a text-based cover. "The great thing about working in publishing is that there is always plenty of great copy," Stoddart continues, "particularly when working with the classics. Simon Winder and the editorial team did a superb job selecting short pieces for this series – some of the books are complete short stories and some are extracts. The extracts had evocative lines pulled from the texts to use as titles so it quickly become apparent that the charismatic titles (and of course amazing roster of authors) carried a lot of appeal for the covers."

This emphasis on text was carried through to the advertising campaign for the new books, which consists of a series of posters featuring extracts from the titles. Penguin has also launched a website, at littleblackclassics.com, where audiences can browse through the different books in the series by spinning a penguin on a wheel. Again, the design is simple and clean, yet appealing.

Posters advertising the Little Black Classics series

Images from the website to promote the series

In the fonts, and the general look of the covers, Stoddart makes a number of references to Penguin cover designs from the past. "There are some crucial visual references in the design of these Little Black Classics covers," he says." "They echo the main Penguin black classics covers in that they are black and use the same fonts, Futura and Mrs Eaves, but here I've used upper and lower case which softens the expanse of black, and also allows the occasional use of ligatures.

"Making the white strip wider and in the middle is a nod to the original Penguin tri-band covers," he continues. "This reference is great for this anniversary moment (without being too literal) but also because these are also purely typographic covers and we can use a language of brand continuity. Simplicity is the absolutely the key, but it's all in the detail."

littleblackclassics.com

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Y it's the Belfast Children's Festival http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/young-at-art http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/young-at-art#feedback Mon, 02 Mar 2015 13:29:00 +0000 Patrick Burgoyne http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86779

Design studio Paperjam has created a flexible, fun identity for the Belfast Children's Festival which builds on its work for the organising body Young at Art

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Design studio Paperjam has created a flexible, fun identity for the Belfast Children's Festival which builds on its work for the organising body Young at Art

 

 

In November 2014, Paperjam rebranded the Belfast-based not-for-profit Young at Art. The new scheme brought together what were previously three different brands (linked by common typography) under one Y-shaped umbrella. "They wanted to create one visual identity to encompass all three brands identifying all events and festivals as Young at Art endeavours," Paperjam say.

Old Logo

 

Old Belfast Children's Festival logo

 

New Young at Art brand

 

The Belfast Children's Festival this month offered the opportunity to apply the new scheme to one of the organisation's major projects.

The Belfast Children's Festival launch took place in the Office of Important Art in Castle Court with a creative area set up for children in the mall. Paperjam's branding was carried through on stickers, postcards and gift bags as well as festival posters.

 

The Young at Art staff and volunteers were all dressed on brand wearing T-shirts, aprons, brand colours and party hats.

 

 

 

 

The scheme does something quite difficult in that it manages to be both stylish and fun. How many projects aimed at children have we seen that either go too "design-ery" and suck out all the energy and verve, or go the other way and overdo the overtly 'childlike' references?

Paperjam's scheme allows for fun applications like this giant Y made of balloons (and the furry version above)

 

while also having the sophistication to be able to deal with a programme that includes art and theatre, as in these posters. On a practical note, this format also works very well with supplied imagery and the inevitable parade of sponsor logos. I also like the clever use of the stage to create a dark strip out of which to reverse the title and dates and the background patterns

 

 

 

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New drug driving ad from the DfT http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/new-drug-driving-ad-from-the-dft http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/march/new-drug-driving-ad-from-the-dft#feedback Mon, 02 Mar 2015 09:30:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86774

The DFT has launched a new Think! campaign to mark a change in the law in the UK with regards to driving under the influence of drugs, which comes into force today.

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The DfT has launched a new Think! campaign to mark a change in the law in the UK with regards to driving under the influence of drugs, which comes into force today.

The new law sees specified limits set for both illegal and prescription drugs, with an offence committed if drivers are found with amounts above these limits in their system. To publicise the change, ad agency AMV BBDO has created the spot below, which plays on the paranoia that can be associated with drug-taking.

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The spot has similarities with the previous Think! campaign against drug driving, Eyes (shown below), which focused on the fact that your eyes can give away that you have taken drugs.

If anything though, this new spot is more subtle than Eyes, which is now over five years old. Instead of addressing the damage that drug driving can cause to lives, it simply emphasises the fact that the laws have been tightened. This is perhaps due to the complex mix of people targeted in the ad, which includes those who take prescription drugs that may affect driving, as well as those taking drugs for recreation.

As a point of comparison, the DFT's recent anti-drink driving spot (below), which marked 50 years of drink-driving ads, was significantly more shocking, though over the years the DFT has experimented with many different approaches to get its message about drink-driving across.

Alongside the film shown top, the new drug driving campaign will play out on radio, out-of-home and digital platforms.

Credits:
Agency: AMV BBDO
Creative directors: Steve Jones, Martin Laraine
Creatives: Mike Crowe, Rob Messeter
Director: Frederic Planchon
Production company: Academy

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Best of Feed: Feb 2015 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/february/feed-feb-15 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/february/feed-feb-15#feedback Sat, 28 Feb 2015 11:37:00 +0000 Creative Review http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86767

Our latest round-up of projects uploaded to CR's Feed section includes some beautiful packaging, a scratch-off fruit machine gig poster and a project to restore some valued hospital equipment

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Our latest round-up of projects uploaded to CR's Feed section includes some beautiful packaging, a scratch-off fruit machine gig poster and a project to restore some valued hospital equipment

 

 

The poster was created for a recent Jack White show in Las Vegas by Matthew Jacobson and Shelby Rodeffer, who are both part of the design team at agency DigitasLBi’s office in Chicago, and was printed by Kyle Baker at Baker Prints, also in Chicago. Each silkscreened poster was hand-stamped with a unique combination of symbols hidden under an opaque layer of scratch-off ink. A handful were winning combinations that netted the owner prizes on top of the poster they have just purchased. More here

 

Packaging now and this beautiful project for Chinese water brand Nongfu by Horse. Produced for high-end restaurants, bars and hotels, the bottles feature eight different plant and animal species from Moya Spring, at the foot of Changbai Mountain - the volcanic region bordering China and North Korea that produces the water.



The screen-printed design pays homage to the source by depicting indigenous species, including the Siberian Tiger and Chinese Merganser, and is accompanied by Chinese copy that reveals facts about the region. More here

 

It's not easy to work on as mainstream and large-scale a project as Heineken's sponsorship of the Champions League. Bulletproof's packaging and a visual identity system is admirably clean and impactful. More here

 

 

High-end whisky now – William Grant's Ghosted Reserves range by threebrand.“The typography used was clean and reminiscent of the era in which the distilleries, from where the whisky was sourced, were operating. The secondary packaging provided a tactile casing for the bottle, with a ribbon pull that gave way to a deep-set drawer and hand-applied labels.” More here

Onto branding – Co-operative Pharmacy, the UK’s third-largest pharmacy chain with 780 stores and more than 7,000 employees, has relaunched as Well, with a new identity by healthcare advertising agency Langland. The new name reflects a shift in people’s attitudes to health, from passively accepting treatment, towards taking a more active role in personal wellness, the studio says. More here

 

Kozmic Sound is an audio production studio in Canada. They needed a powerful new logo for their re-launch. The solution, say studio Rethink, was to flip the iconic audio symbol on its head, transforming it into a spaceship. More here

 

Finally, a project by Artfelt for The Children's Hospital in Sheffield.

 

When the hospital found its set of 1970s toys - used for decades to test hearing in children - had became damaged and unfit for purpose, staff thought they could easily replace them with a new set. But after discovering the maker, Escor Toys, had gone out of business in 2012, Cat Powell, from Artfelt - The Children’s Hospital Charity’s arts programme, set about restoring the mini figures to bring them back into use.



 

Cat sourced artists from across the UK to get involved in the project by painting a selection of the 250 figures and creating unique designs, depicting everything from superheroes and animals, to women from around the world and characters from popular culture. More here

 

Anyone can upload projects to Feed using our simple self-serve system. It's free, you justhave to regsiter. Full details here

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Ads of the Week http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/february/ads-of-the-week2 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/february/ads-of-the-week2#feedback Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:09:00 +0000 Eliza Williams http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86757

We have a clutch of TV spots to share with you this week, ranging from the ridiculous (Mentos) to the inspirational (Scorsese for Apple). But we open with a project that uses digital billboards in London to address how the economic and cultural landscape of the city is changing...

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We have a clutch of TV spots to share with you this week, ranging from the ridiculous (Mentos) to the inspirational (Scorsese for Apple). But we open with a project that uses digital billboards in London to address how the economic and cultural landscape of the city is changing...

Instigated by Rebecca Ross, communication design course leader at Central Saint Martins, this is arguably more an art or political project than an ad campaign, but it uses the good old fashioned billboard to raise questions about the way that London is changing. With housing becoming simply unaffordable for many, especially those in the creative industries, there are increasing fears that London is a city slowly losing its soul – this project addresses the issue directly, through quotes from real people who are either leaving or moving to the city. It begins online, at londonischanging.org, where those who are planning to relocate to or from London over the next twelve months are asked to answer a series of questions. Their answers are then fed into the digital billboards, which are situated in central London and constantly updated with new quotes. The posters will be up for just a few days though the online project will continue to run throughout 2015.

And now for something completely different. This new spot for Mentos, created for the Italian market, initially seems like it's going to be a load of cheesy nonsense. But then something quite unexpected happens, which is very funny... Agency: BBH; Creative directors: Gary McCreadie, Wesley Hawes, Shelley Smoler, Raphael Basckin; Director: Benjamin Weinstein; Production company: Blink.

As you may be aware, the Oscars took place last weekend, and a number of brands released big film-related ads for the occasion. This spot for Apple features a bunch of students making a film with their iPads, which is a nice product demo, but it's the voiceover by Martin Scorsese that really brings the piece to life. Rather than dealing in platitudes, the director makes some genuine interesting, possibly even inspiring, comments about the filmmaking process. Agency: TBWA\Media Arts Lab.

Also released on Oscar night was this spot for Xfinity, a talking guide from Comcast which can help the visually-impaired enjoy TV shows and movies. The ad stars Emily, a charming and imaginative seven year-old who was born blind, but hasn't let that get in the way of her enjoyment of the Wizard of Oz. Agency: Goodby, Silverstein & Partners; Director: Andreas Nilsson; Production company: Biscuit Filmworks.

We close this week's round up with a silly but fun spot for Canal Digital from TBWA\Stockholm, which shows how watching TV can help you deal with unexpected moments in life.

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Design Indaba 2015: Day three http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/february/indaba-day-3 http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2015/february/indaba-day-3#feedback Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:24:00 +0000 Rachael Steven http://www.creativereview.co.uk/content.php?page_id=86740

The final day of Cape Town creative conference Design Indaba featured talks from maverick filmmaker Casey Neistat; Interlude founder, and creator of Bob Dylan's Like a Rolling Stone interactive video, Yoni Bloch; plus Dan Wieden and Emily Oberman.

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The final day of Cape Town creative conference Design Indaba featured talks from maverick filmmaker Casey Neistat; Interlude founder, and creator of Bob Dylan's Like a Rolling Stone interactive video, Yoni Bloch; plus Dan Wieden and Emily Oberman.

Casey Neistat discussed how a lack of formal training and a desire to do things he isn't supposed to has led to a successful filmmaking career and millions of online followers.

Neistat dropped out of school aged 15 – growing up, he said he was in "a permanent state of trouble. If there's one mantra I can remember being fed to me, it was that I was doing something wrong ... which meant I wasn't doing something the way I was supposed to. I dropped out of high school in the tenth grade, but then I got a computer and fell in love with the idea of telling stories or sharing perspectives through videos... I didn't know how you were supposed to make movies, or use a camera or distribute them," he explained.

After making a series of short documentaries and a feature film, Neistat made an eight-episode series with his brother Van titled the Neistat Brothers, which he sold to HBO in 2008. "We made the show ourselves, paid for it and shot it, then sold it for a couple of million dollars. But I hated the process ... it took two years to get it on air," he said. It was this frustration at traditional distribution methods that led him to focus on putting his own films on YouTube.

After shooting an amusing film about the perils of cycling in New York's bike lanes in 2011 – which achieved viral success within 24 hours – Neistat was invited to make videos for the New York Times and approached by several ad agencies, but became frustrated with following a pre-determined script or brief, and decided to convince clients to let him make his own ideas instead.

Nike was the first client to allow him to do this, he said – a collaboration that led to Make it Count, a film for Nike FuelBand in which Neistat and editor Max Joseph spent the entire budget they had been given by the brand to make the ad on travelling the world, visiting 13 countries over 10 days.

"I wrote an idea, Nike gave me the budget, then at the ninth hour I said, 'lets just take the money, do what we've always wanted and travel the world. I showed it to Nike and they said, 'Casey, what is this? You're not even wearing Nike in the video?"

Nike allowed him to put the film on his own YouTube channel, however, and it has since had more than 13 million hits. After initial confusion over whether it was a hoax, it was widely accepted as a hugely successful piece of content for the brand.

Neistat did the same for 20th Century Fox after being asked to make a promotional film for Ben Stiller film Walter Mitty on the theme of living your dreams, spending the $25,000 budget on delivering supplies to people affected by a typhoon in the Philippines. The video was another hit, with over four million views on YouTube.

 

Neistat ended his talk with a series of videos documenting his proposal to his girlfriend (now wife), his wedding and the birth of his daughter, offering a funny and heartfelt look at the couple's relationship and starting their own family.

Reflecting on why he chose to share such intimate films about his life with online audiences, he said: "I don't think it's because I'm a voyeurist. I don't know how to write a rom-com or a film about science fiction – what I know are my experiences and ideas and stories. It's only by nurturing and embracing that lack of understanding, and ignorance, that I've been able to do what I do."

 

Yoni Bloch, co-founder of Interlude (which made last year’s interactive video for Bob Dylan’s Like a Rolling Stone) discussed using new technologies to create interactive film, ads and TV shows.

Bloch, a musician, said he started recording songs and uploading them to an Israeli social media site as a teenager in the 1990s, gaining “a geeky fan base of kids who were also early adopters of the internet". He was eventually signed to a record label, released three albums, appeared as a judge on an Israeli version of TV show American Idol, and started making music videos for his own songs.

“When I started my career, music videos were dying, but it had become easier to make them, so I created them for my band. Then, a couple of years ago, we decided to do something different – we talked about making an interactive video ... no-one had done it the way we thought it should be done.”

The video guided viewers through a house at a party in Tel Aviv. As new characters appeared, viewers could click on them to shape the course of the narrative, resulting in 256 possible outcomes. To make it, the group had to create their own software and as a result, founded Interlude. They also made an interactive film featuring the Israeli President and another in which viewers could create a personalised song for someone, before being contacted by Bob Dylan’s family and asked to create a video to mark the 50th anniversary of Like a Rolling Stone.

Since then, the company has created ads for Revlon, Subaru, Mac, Shell and clothing company Madewell and worked on music videos for Aloe Blacc, Whiz Kalifa and Coldplay. It has also teamed up with a company that develops eye-tracking software to create a humerous film which unfolds in response to viewers' eye movements. Viewers witness a man trying to propose to his girlfriend, but can interrupt or disrupt his popping the question by glancing at other characters around the room. Bloch said the company is also working on interactive TV shows (including one with Flight of the Concords star Jemaine Clement and another starring a cat), and short films where viewers will be able manipulate narratives and interact beyond clicking and swiping their screens.

While the internet has led to huge leaps in the way we consume information and interact with others, Bloch said videos have, until recently, been relatively slow to catch up, but added: "I think now, video is in its most exciting form...we've started to look at new kinds of storytelling techniques, and are trying to create a new medium."

 

 

 

After Bloch was a talk from Emily Oberman, who discussed her work creating graphics for Saturday Night Live (including the show's new opening sequence, a book to commemorate its 40th anniversary and graphics for a documentary about the show, premiering at Tribeca Film Festival in April). She also spoke about the challenges of creating perfect parodies – from spoof commercials for a cookie dough drink made for athletes for SNL to designing the identity, packaging and a fictional ad campaign for Ablixa, a fictional antidepressant which featured in Steven Sodebergh film, Side Effects (some of which was filmed at Pentagram's offices).

 

 

Dan Wieden also discussed what he thinks has made Wieden + Kennedy so successful over the years, and what he thinks are the biggest challenges facing the agency today.

Discussing the brand’s early days working from a tiny office in Portland, Oregon ("the only people who wanted to move there were kids right out of school or people who’d been fired from everywhere else," he said), Wieden said there was never any grand strategy for the agency, bar a mission statement that it would exist "to make strong, provocative relationships between good companies and their customers."

"We began as a ship of fools – that’s exactly why we succeeded,” he said. “We were struggling to figure out what an ad agency was, when it came to marketing we were incredibly naive … but sometimes stupid can work. When you don’t know, you try desperately to figure it out, but the minute you think you know it all, that’s when you're dead."

The agency's ability to make weird, funny, touching and provocative ads was built on a culture of "giving people permission to fail", he said, adding that the company thrived on chaos and weirdness.

“I love this agency when it's off-balance. I'm addicted to chaos. The older I get, the more I like things that force me to look twice. Chaos does an amazing thing that order can't – it engages you and issues a challenge, and shows you ... all the weird shit order tries to hide,” he said.

As the company has grown to having offices in eight cities, Wieden said its biggest struggle was ensuring things didn't remain static, and added that the agency is "in a period of extreme sensitivity". "Digital is redefining the way people engage with the world, the kind of talent we bring into our organisation ... these fluctuations are creating big ripples ... but you either break down or break through," he said.

Thirty-three years after it was founded, he said W+K remains fiercely independent and will never, "under any circumstances" be sold off. For an in-depth insight into the agency, read Eliza Williams's feature from the 2012 issue of Creative Review here.

You can follow more Design Indaba events using the hashtag #designindaba or see designindaba.com for more info about the conference.

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