Meet Miss Kō, a restaurant identity by GBH

Gregory Bonner Hale (GBH) has created the graphic identity for Miss Kō, a new Asian fusion restaurant in Paris that sports a Phillipe Starck interior which GBH describe as “a place where cultures collide, fantasy rules and nothing is what it seems”…

Gregory Bonner Hale has created the graphic identity for Miss Kō, a new Asian fusion restaurant in Paris that sports a Phillipe Starck interior which GBH describe as “a place where cultures collide, fantasy rules and nothing is what it seems”…

The restaurant’s name and identity are based, GBH tell us, around the fictitious Miss Kō, “a young, sexy but eternally mysterious symbol of Asia, and the embodiment of its traditions and its strangeness,” says GBH creative director Peter Hale.

Miss Kō herself appears in the brand identity as a naked woman, her face in shadow, showing off her full body suit tattoo, a sign in some Asian cultures, apparently, of ties to the underworld.

The artwork for Miss Kō’s colourful tattoos was created by Horikitsune (aka Alex Kofuu Reinke), the only European to have trained as an apprentice (for more than 15 years) in the traditional Japanese art of Irezumi (tattooing). The campaign imagery was shot by Uli Webber.

The restaurant’s logotype is made up of nine grains of rice, each one representing one of the countries that inspired the creation of the Miss Kō menu. The logotype and photographed imagery of the tattoed female body come together in the business cards shown at the top of this post, while the menus themselves all purport to be items from Miss Kō’s world: the cocktail menu poses as her private sketchbook with each cocktail named after one of her friends (Ginza boy, Madame Keiko and Crazy MoFo) and represented by an illustrated character:

The dessert menu features photos of from Miss Kō as a child:

And the main food and drink menu covers feature more photographic imagery of her impressive full-body tattoo art:

Not to mention an intriguing menu item, the Bim Bim Bap Burger:

Meanwhile, outside the restaurant, the signage looks like this:

And just below it, connected, we’re told, by a tangle of wires, is a chest-height digital sign that displays an animated version of the Miss Kō logo which displays the restaurant’s name in different Asian languages:

Here’s a look at the animation that plays on the box:

And this animation of grains of rice (that occasionally form the Miss Kō logo) is projected onto the floor:

To see more of of GBH’s work, visit gregorybonnerhale.com.

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