47,000 handpainted stars

Turner Prize-winning artist Richard Wright has created a new work for Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum consisting of two ceiling paintings of over 47,000 black stars

Turner Prize-winning artist Richard Wright has created a new work for Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum consisting of two ceiling paintings of over 47,000 black stars

Wright painted the whole thing by hand and was apparently inspired by inspired by the original 19th century decorative wall and ceiling paintings in the museum designed by its original architect, Pierre Cuypers.

There is also a reference to their specific location – the paintings are situated outside the museum’s Night Watch gallery, home to Rembrandt’s painting of the same name.

The work is the latest in a series of commissions in and around the museum which tie in with its restoration. The revamped museum opens to the public on April 13.

Check out our post on Irma Boom’s new identity scheme for the Rijksmuseum here

All images copyright Vincent Mentzel


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The March issue of CR magazine celebrates 150 years of the London Underground. In it we introduce a new book by Mark Ovenden, which is the first study of all aspects of the tube’s design evolution; we ask Harry Beck authority, Ken Garland, what he makes of a new tube map concept by Mark Noad; we investigate the enduring appeal of Edward Johnston’s eponymous typeface; Michael Evamy reports on the design story of world-famous roundel; we look at the London Transport Museum’s new exhibition of 150 key posters from its archive; we explore the rich history of platform art, and also the Underground’s communications and advertising, past and present. Plus, we talk to London Transport Museum’s head of trading about TfL’s approach to brand licensing and merchandising. In Crit, Rick Poynor reviews Branding Terror, a book about terrorist logos, while Paul Belford looks at how a 1980 ad managed to do away with everything bar a product demo. Finally, Daniel Benneworth-Grey reflects on the merits on working home alone. Buy your copy here.

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