A Flat-Packed Christmas

We first saw Alexander Glenn’s work as part of his Nottingham Trent University degree show at the New Designers event last summer. Being the nice chap that he is, the young designer stayed in touch; even including us on his Christmas card list. And here’s what he sent: an Ikea-style, flat-packed Christmas tree that you can assemble and proudly stand on your desk. It comes complete with instructions and that all important hotline number you can ring in case some of the bits are missing (rather more helpfully, this one puts you in contact with Glenn’s own studio)…

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We first saw Alexander Glenn‘s work as part of his Nottingham Trent University degree show at the New Designers event last summer. Being the nice chap that he is, the young designer stayed in touch; even including us on his Christmas card list. And here’s what he sent: an Ikea-style, flat-packed Christmas tree that you can assemble and proudly stand on your desk. It comes complete with instructions and that all important hotline number you can ring in case some of the bits are missing (rather more helpfully, this one puts you in contact with Glenn’s own studio)…

Glenn2

Of his Christmas card Glenn reveals that, as well as offering seasonal greetings, it “looks at the throw-away society and mass consumerism especially around Christmas time. The idea of a flat-pack Christmas card reflected this idea and lent itself to Ikea’s furniture, while making it cheap to post too. Recipients can then build their own Christmas card, which is more interesting than a bit of folding card.”

The accompanying instructions:

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Glenn-instructions2

While we’re at it, we thought we’d also show you some of Glenn’s work from his degree show. Taking Type for a Walk was one of his student projects that involved taking a half a mile walk and the conveying the experience typographically. “The work also had to reflect the architecture and environment,” he says, “and I decided to walk around the Queens Medical Centre Hospital in Nottingham.”

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“In recording the sights, sounds, smells, conversations and emotions experienced, presenting the work as an X-Ray seemed a fitting choice to reflect the environment. A mixture of Futurist, Constructivist and Modernist typography helped reflect the architecture, labyrinths of corridors and geometric shapes that were a major influence on the designs. These movements were also affected by warfare – with the National Health Service being established in 1948, after World War Two. It seemed an appropriate way to exhibit these ideas together.

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“The work is created by Letrasetting designs onto tracing paper, then layering these up on a computer screen and photographing them. Working by hand with Letraset gave more control and freedom and felt more traditional than using a computer.”

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More of Glenn’s work can be seen at www.alexglenn.co.uk. Merry Christmas Alex!

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