Ads of the Week

YouTube is 10. It’s slightly hard to believe that the website that has proved so revolutionary to so many industries has only just reached double figures, but it’s certainly a birthday worth celebrating. And a new film from directors Hoku & Adam does it in style, with an animated A to Z of the channel’s biggest moments. The film opens this week’s round up of great new ads.

YouTube is 10. It’s slightly hard to believe that the website that has proved so revolutionary to so many industries has only just reached double figures, but it’s certainly a birthday worth celebrating. And a new film from directors Hoku & Adam does it in style, with an animated A to Z of the channel’s biggest moments. The film opens this week’s round up of great new ads.

 

Agency: Flying Object; Creative directors: Tim Partridge, Tom Pursey; Directors: Hoku & Adam; Guest directors: James Curran (2D animation), Victor Haegelin (Claymation); Production company: Partizan

 


Next up is this charming spot for Scrabble, which features plenty of clever wordplay. Agency: Lola Madrid; ECD: Pancho Cassis; Director: Rodrigo Saavedra.

 

Greenpeace has released a new film in its Save The Arctic campaign, which again attacks Shell and its plans to drill in the region. The ad is a more subtle piece of work than its previous Lego spot (which took aim at the toy brand’s corporate partnership with Shell) but is intriguing nonetheless, featuring three classic American landscape paintings, shown subsumed by fire and left devastated. Agency: Don’t Panic; Creative director: Richard Beer; Director: Martin Stirling; Production company: Partizan.

 

We’ve seen a few clever digital billboard stunts now, but this one for Brazilian coffee brand Cafe Pele is up there with the best. Its premise is simple: yawning is contagious and coffee wakes you up, so put a billboard of a yawning man on a subway station and everyone will start feeling sleepy and head for a caffeine hit. Agency: Lew’Lara TBWA.

 

Inspired by the famous monkey selfie photograph – which led to a battle over rights for the photographer David Slater (who owned the camera used by the monkey) – a new campaign for WWF sees the animal charity link up with image library LatinStock to create a series of photographs where the copyrights are owned by animals. It includes imagery shot from cameras fixed to animals’ backs, and any time an image from the collection is used, all profits go to WWF. The film above explains the project in more detail, and the Animal Copyrights collection can be found on the LatinStock site at animalcopyrights.org. Agency: Cheil, Madrid; ECD: Breno Cotta; Creatives: Isaac Marato, Cristina Alonso, Diego Rodriguez, José Venditti; Production company: Jabuba Films.

 



We close this week’s round up with the second ad campaign in a week that has a clever suggestion for how we can subvert banner ads and put them to better use. Earlier this week, we covered D&AD’s Ad Filter, which replaces boring ads with Pencil-winning work, and in this campaign (explained in the film above) from Proximity Russia, you can replace banners with Post-it notes of your to-do lists. It’s another clever piece of work, though combined with D&AD’s plug-in does suggest that maybe it’s time for some more creative banner ads to make an appearance… Agency: Proximity Russia; Creative director: Andrew Kontra; Creatives: Polina Zabrodskaya, Anna Migaleva, Fernando Muto; Digital production house: Indee Interactive.

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Artworker

NAO (National Audit Office)