Anthony Burrill on the design of the Google Beach in Cannes

The 2015 Cannes Lions is now underway, with talks, awards and parties taking place all week across the French city. The advertising and design event is touted as a ‘festival of creativity’, though is often rather dull and corporate on the visual front. One exception to this is the Google Beach, which is designed this year by Anthony Burrill and celebrates ten years of YouTube…

The 2015 Cannes Lions is now underway, with talks, awards and parties taking place all week across the French city. The advertising and design event is touted as a ‘festival of creativity’, though is often rather dull and corporate on the visual front. One exception to this is the Google Beach, which is designed this year by Anthony Burrill and celebrates ten years of YouTube…

Over the course of the week, Google will be inviting a number of YouTube stars, including The Slow Mo Guys, Les Twins, and Helbig & Hart, to host talks and events on the beach. There will also be fitness and baking events, industry talks, DJ sets, and an inter-agency beach volleyball competition taking place, as well as the highly subscribed Google Party on the Thursday night.

 

 

Burrill, who also worked on the space last year, has been closely involved in every aspect of this year’s look (which he created in collaboration with ‘brand experience’ agency Flourish), and the aim has been to inject his personality across the site. “My input has always been to steer it away from being too corporate,” he says. “Because I’m completely outside Google culture, I’m coming at it from a different angle. A lot of proposals I came up with were just to push everyone to make it into an interesting space.”

While Burrill is particularly associated with text and slogans, his designs extend well beyond this in the space. “It’s not so much text,” he continues. “I’ve done lots of geometric stuff, using some of the YouTube icons. The overall feel of the space is more me  – rather than just having my stuff slapped on there, I’m a bit more in the DNA of the space really…. It was designing everything from little stickers that go on plastic cups right to the main stage which is five metres high. We’ve done lots of visuals and animations for when the mystery attraction is performing [at the party].”

 

 

The team began work on the beach space in February. “I think it’s amazing they put so much energy into it, it’s really cool,” Burrill continues. “It’s a brilliant project to work on because I get involved in architecture and the way the spaces work. Everything is built on the computer in 3D and we can apply graphics to things  – it’s completely different to the normal stuff that I do.”

The Google Beach is open to all Cannes Lions delegates until Friday. More info on Cannes Lions is at canneslions.com.

More from CR

New designs: Luke Tonge, Lee Goater, Here, Atlas, Plaid & more

Our latest pick of new designs includes issue two of Monotype magazine The Recorder, a typographic map of Philadelphia by Paula Scher, an exhibition of circular work by Leeds designer Lee Goater and a book documenting 40 years of footwear brand Camper.

Record sleeves of the month

Our latest pick of great album art includes an animated record sleeve for Jaga Jazzist, acid bright folk art for Nozinja, a beautiful deluxe box set for Of Monsters and Men and some psychedelic designs for Tame Impala. First up, though, is Andrew Archer’s illustrated cover art for Everything Everything’s Get to Heaven.

Station to Station arrives at the Barbican

Doug Aitken’s travelling arts project, Station to Station, has arrived at London’s Barbican Centre for 30 days of live events spanning music, film, dance, design and performance art. We took a look around the exhibition, which follows an ambitious programme of “cultural happenings” in the US.

Brands and parenting advice: an unhappy combo

Brands have long wanted to tell us what to do: what clothes to wear, what food to eat, what car to drive. But lately, with the urge to appear ‘worthy’ and ‘good’, they seem to want to get involved in the more emotional aspects of our lives too, even suggesting how we should parent our kids. And, frankly, it’s becoming rather annoying

Junior Designer

Consultants in Design
Curious logo
NSPCC logo