Best Wishes From Ian Stevenson

Image from Best Wishes Get Well Soon – a collection of Ian Stevenson’s work, published by Concrete Hermit
Best Wishes Get Well Soon, published by Concrete Hermit, is a 112 page book that showcases a selection of work by illustrator Ian Stevenson…

Image from Best Wishes Get Well Soon
Image from Best Wishes Get Well Soon – a collection of Ian Stevenson’s work, published by Concrete Hermit

Best Wishes Get Well Soon, published by Concrete Hermit, is a 112 page book that showcases a selection of work by illustrator Ian Stevenson.

Visually striking, there’s a twisted sense of fun – along with what can only be described as a ridiculous sense of menace – in Stevenson’s work collected therein. For example, there’s something very wrong about the pathetic, naked character sprawled on the floor announcing “I wish I had a pound”. Meanwhile, a smiling, red creature tells his smaller, yellow worm-like companion: “Tomorrow I will eat you.”

Stevenson’s characters are deliberately simplistic and seemingly non-threatening in style, yet these often freakish creations utter the strangest things and it is this combination, of word and image, that ultimately conspires to make you laugh – nearly always out loud and in a that’s-fucked-up kind of way.

Ian Stevenson's Best Wishes Get Well Soon book cover
Spread from Best Wishes Get Well Soon
Spread from Best Wishes Get Well Soon
Spread from Best Wishes Get Well Soon
Image from Best Wishes Get Well Soon

For more info, visit Concrete Hermit’s website

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