Bulldog clips: the new fingers?

On the left, last year’s preferred design photo style (by Michalt Slawek) looks as though it may have been ousted by a new preference for the bull dog clip
Just over a year ago we posted on the trend for designers to shoot their work as if held up in front of their faces – or at least their friends’ faces. Now, it seems, those familiar fingers are being replaced by the humble bulldog clip as design’s photography style du jour…

fingerscomp.jpg
On the left, last year’s preferred design photo style (by Michalt Slawek) looks as though it may have been ousted by a new preference for the bull dog clip

Just over a year ago we posted on the trend for designers to shoot their work as if held up in front of their faces – or at least their friends’ faces. Now, it seems, those familiar fingers are being replaced by the humble bulldog clip as design’s photography style du jour…

Two projects featured in the April issue of CR (out tomorrow folks) feature posters held up by clips – nice designer-y clips of course.

We have the Build/Generation Press Not For Commercial Use project (which we first wrote about here) employing some rather natty red clips set at a jaunty angle

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And also these posters from Peep Show (which you can win in this month’s Gallery prize) which go for something expensive-looking in classic black.

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So, is it the end for fingers? Anyone have any more examples of the clip method?

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