Cantona documentary kicks off at Amnesty football film festival

Looking for Rio, a documentray exploring the history and culture of football in Rio, directed by Eric Cantona and his two brothers, will have its premiere at Sidelines, a football film festival organised by Amnesty UK

Looking for Rio, a documentray exploring the history and culture of football in Rio, directed by Eric Cantona and his two brothers, will have its premiere at Sidelines, a football film festival organised by Amnesty UK

Sidelines will run from June 6 to 8 at Hackney Picturehouse in London. Screenings and panel discussions will, say Amnesty UK, bring “the two worlds of football and human rights together”. “So often, human rights have fallen by the wayside in the frenzy of sporting glory. We saw it this year in Sochi and it’s happening again in Brazil, Qatar and beyond,” says Amnesty International UK director Kate Allen. “Amnesty has been campaigning around sporting events for some time and our work has never been more important than it is now. Through captivating documentaries and panel debates, Amnesty’s film festival is set to influence, inspire and unite the two worlds of sport and human rights.”

Cantona’s hour-long documentary traces the development of Rio’s four main football clubs – Fluminense, Vasco de Gama, Flamengo and Botafago – and “looks at the complex relationship Rio has with football where government spending on the World Cup has forced Brazilians on the streets in protest”. See the trailer here.

After the screening on June 7, Cantona and his brothers Joel and Jean-Marie wil be doing a Q&A session on stage.

Other documentaries during the festival include American Pharaoh, which looks at the experience of US coach Bob Bradley taking over the Egypt team during the Arab Spring

Also, The Railroad Allstars, tells the story of a team in Guatemala City made up of local sex workers while Sidelines also includes a double-bill of Informe Robinson, the Spanish documentary series presented by former English profesional player Michael Robinson: The Children of the Habana tells the story of the evacuation of 4,000 children from Bilbao to Southampton during the Spanish Civil War, some of whom went on to become the first Spaniards to play professionally in England, while The Hour of Africa looks at what the 2010 World Cup meant for South Africa.

Panel discussions also tackle diversity and race in the game and the responsibility og sporting organisations such as FIFA to address human rights abuses in host countries.

Sidelines is at Hackney Picturehouse, London E8, from June 6 to 8. Full details here

 

More from CR

An interview with Roger Ballen

Photographer Roger Ballen talks to Creative Review about his latest monograph, Asylum of the Birds, and why he thinks that films are now the best way to advertise books…

CR May iPad edition

In case you still haven’t got your hands on a copy on this month’s Creative Review, don’t forget it is also available on the iPad. It includes all the Best in Book winners, and other content from the CR Annual 2014, with additional videos and exclusive images. Plus, there’s a lot more to be found in Hi Res, our showcase gallery section, and CRTV, with video profiles of creative people and other moving image work from around the world….

Stair Bears

A self-initiated project from creative agency DBLG creates a charming stop motion animation using 50 3D printed model bears

Cartoons go bald to promote cancer awareness

April is Cancer Awareness Month in Brazil, and ad agency Ogilvy Brazil has created a campaign to help support kids with the disease that features various famous cartoon characters – including Garfield, Popeye and Hello Kitty – all with their heads shaved.

Lecturer Design Management

Kingston University

Design Assistant

Cultureshock Media