Celebrities Beaten Up for Women’s Aid

Grey London has created this new poster campaign for Women’s Aid to highlight the prevalence of domestic violence against women. Featuring typically stark photographs by Rankin, the campaign aims to tackle the issue of the silence that surrounds domestic abuse by featuring famous female celebrities with all-too-realistic bruises and cuts and asking the question “What does it take to get people talking about domestic abuse?”

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Grey London has created this new poster campaign for Women’s Aid to highlight the prevalence of domestic violence against women. Featuring typically stark photographs by Rankin, the campaign aims to tackle the issue of the silence that surrounds domestic abuse by featuring famous female celebrities with all-too-realistic bruises and cuts and asking the question “What does it take to get people talking about domestic abuse?”

The posters are most affective because of the excellent make-up – the wounds really look disturbingly genuine – and the acting by the participants. Anna Friel looks close to tears and the normally glamorous Honor Blackman appears with almost no make-up, looking elderly and fragile.

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It is a depressing truth that it seems to always require celebrity involvement these days to get attention for any worthy issue, but here the use of the female actors and presenters is at least used to make a relevant point: we would all be talking about it if any of these stars were seen in public so damaged. From talking it is still another step to getting people to act to stop the abuse, but hopefully this campaign may help make the subject less taboo.

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