Clichés of Brazil

Brazilian designer Gustavo Piqueira’s new book uses early 20th century printers’ ‘clichés’ to address stereotypical views of his country and its history.

Brazilian designer Gustavo Piqueira’s new book uses early 20th century printers’ ‘clichés’ to address stereotypical views of his country and its history.

The term ‘cliché’ refers to printers pre-preparing stock phrases as single pieces of metal so that they didn’t have to set them anew each time they were used. The term can also refer to plates engraved with stock images to be used to complement text in letterpress-printed material. Brazilian publisher Ateliê Editorial published a facsimile edition of a collection of such images in 2003. Piqueira chose to play on the dual meaning of the word by using the clichés to illustrate clichéd views of Brazilian history and the country today in a new book entitled, you guessed it, Brazilian Clichés.

The book looks at historical events such as the arrival of the Portuguese, the conversion of the native people to Christianity, slavery and the economic booms brought by coffee and gold.

Contemporary Brazilian clichés include traffic jams and debt. The book’s cover is made of a sheet of wood, printed in silkscreen, attached with adhesive tape. It has a limited print run of one thousand numbered copies.

 

More details here

 

 

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