CR June issue: the Hipgnosis archive

Pink Floyd fans may recognise the cover of our June issue. It’s the original marked-up artwork for Dark Side of the Moon: one of a number of treasures from the archive of design studio Hipgnosis featured in the issue

Pink Floyd fans may recognise the cover of our June issue. It’s the original marked-up artwork for Dark Side of the Moon: one of a number of treasures from the archive of design studio Hipgnosis featured in the issue

The lead feature in our June issue is an interview with Aubrey Powell who looks back on his relationship with the late great Storm Thorgerson and the work the two of them created for bands such as Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and, of course, Pink Floyd at their Hipgnosis design studio.

For the piece, Powell allowed CR access to the Hipgnosis archive so that we are able to show, for the first time ever in some cases, treasures such as the original contact sheet for Pink Floyd’s Ummagumma album, revealing how the final repeating image was made, a rejected sketch for the Animals sleeve and contact sheets for Led Zeppelin’s Houses of the Holy sleeve.

 

We have a special effects theme for the issue. While Storm and Aubrey created most of their work ‘for real’ we contrast their approach with the latest R&D from leading CGI houses

 

Plus we take a look at an intriguing collaboration between artists Rob and Nick Carter and visual effects house MPC which brings old master paintings to life as digital artworks.

 

In contrast, we interview the authors of a new book on hand-drawn illustration – The Purple Book explores symbolism and sensuality in contemporary work with five original pieces created in response to key literary texts.

 

 

Also dealing with illustration and storytelling will be an ambitious new show at the V&A. Novelist Hari Kunzru was commissioned to write a new piece for the Memory Palace show which illustrators and designers are helping to turn into a ‘walk-in book’. We talk to those behind the exhibition.

 

In Crit this month we have an excellent piece by designer Michael Rock which re-examines his On Unprofessionalism essay for the digital age, arguing that the idea of the ‘professional’ graphic designer was just a pipe dream.

 

We also have a tribute to Ray Harryhausen by our own Paul Pensom and, in his regular column This Designer’s Life, Daniel Benneworth-Gray considers the use and usefulness of Twitter

 

Gordon Comstock wonders why Charles Saatchi wrote his new book Babble and Paul Belford uses a Waterstone’s ad from 1998 to illustrate the dangers of over-restrictive brand guidelines

 

 

Plus, Jeremy Leslie looks at the indie football titles giving the game some more nuanced coverage and Michael Evamy asseses Venturethree’s identity for The Palestinian Museum amid brands’ new-found desire to be talkative

 

Our subscriber-only Monograph booklet this month is rather special. During this year’s Pick Me Up festival, we organised a felt toy-making workshop with Felt Mistress. This month’s Monograph is a record of the day featuring some of the work made

You can buy the June issue of Creative Review direct from us here. Better yet, subscribe to make sure that you never miss out on a copy – you’ll save money too. Details here.

 

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Senior Creative Designer

Monddi Design Agency

Head of Digital Content

Red Sofa London