D&AD 50: 1965, Go to work on an egg

To mark its 50th birthday, D&AD is delving into its archive to highlight significant pieces of work that have featured in the awards. We will be publishing one a week. This time, it’s the turn of Mather & Crowther’s Go to work on an egg campaign which started in 1957 but was first awarded by D&AD in 1965

To mark its 50th birthday, D&AD is delving into its archive to highlight significant pieces of work that have featured in the awards. We will be publishing one a week. This time, it’s the turn of Mather & Crowther’s Go to work on an egg campaign which started in 1957 but was first awarded by D&AD in 1965

 

By 1965, the slogan ‘Go to work on an egg’ (print ad from 1965 D&AD Annual above) was already embedded in the British consciousness thanks to a long-running TV campaign starring Tony Hancock.

 

 

Eggs had only come off rationing in 1953. In 1957 The British Egg Marketing Board was formed in order to bring stability to the market and give consumers a regular supply of high quality eggs at reasonable prices. One of its first acts was to introduce the British Lion mark: eggs were required to be stamped with their specific grade and packing station number.

The BEMB asked ad agency Mather & Crowther to produce an ad campaign promoting the regular use of eggs. Their solution, Go to work on an egg’, became one of the longest running and most famous slogans of its time. Author Fay Weldon is often attributed with it, although she has said that, though head of copy at the agency at the time, she cannot remember whether or not she actually came up with the line.

 

 

Whoever wrote it, the slogan spawned some of the most entertaining early commercials seen on British TV, which were also among the first to make use of a celebrity, Hancock being perhaps the most popular comedian of the time.

 

Related Content

Read the first post on this series, on Barrie Bates’ 1963 A union, Jack! poster, here
And the second post, on Derek BIrdsall’s covers for Penguin books, here

D&AD’s 50-year timeline of landmark work is here

Creative Review’s February issue will feature our 20 favoruite slogans of all time

 

CR in Print

If you only read CR online, you’re missing out. The January issue of Creative Review is a music special with features on festivals, the future of the music video and much much more. Plus it comes with its very own soundtrack for you to listen to while reading the magazine.

If you would like to buy this issue and are based in the UK, you can search for your nearest stockist here. Based outside the UK? Simply call +44(0)207 292 3703 to find your nearest stockist. Better yet, subscribe to CR for a year here and save yourself almost 30% on the printed magazine.

More from CR

Dudley Sutton stars in new Clock Opera video

This poignant new video for Clock Opera delivers an appropriate message for the new year, suggesting that you should seize the day, whatever age you are. And best of all, it stars Tinker Dill from Lovejoy!

More Christmas Post

Christmas is a time for giving and sharing, and is also an opportunity for ad agencies to compete to create the most inventive Christmas messages. Here’s some of our favourites so far this year…

D&AD 50: To Kill a Mockingbird, 1964

To mark its 50th birthday, D&AD is delving into its archive to highlight significant pieces of work that have featured in the awards. We will be publishing one a week with accompanying analysis by ex-Design Week editor Lynda Relph-Knight. This week, Derek Birdsall talks to Relph-Knight about his highly innovative cover for To Kill a Mockingbird

Graphic Designer

Fushi Wellbeing

Creative Designer

Monddi Design Agency