D&AD 50: Pregnant Man, 1970

To mark its 50th birthday, D&AD is delving into its archive to highlight significant pieces of work that have featured in the awards. We will be publishing one a week. This time, we have a press ad from 1970 that established the reputation of an ambitious new agency on London’s Charlotte Street

To mark its 50th birthday, D&AD is delving into its archive to highlight significant pieces of work that have featured in the awards. We will be publishing one a week. This time, we have a press ad from 1970 that established the reputation of an ambitious new agency on London’s Charlotte Street

The Pregant Man, an ad for the Family Planning Association, will forever be associated with Saatchi & Saatchi – the agency even named its in-house pub in honour of the piece of work that did so much to establish its creative credentials. But the ad was not actually created under the Saatchi & Saatchi name at all. Jeremy Sinclair, who has worked with the Saatchis for over 40 years, wrote it while still at Saatchi & Saatchi forerunner, Cramersaatchi.

CR’s October 2010 issue featured a major profile on Sinclair, who began working with Charles Saatchi fresh out of the advertising course at Watford Art School. “I left there clutching my portfolio and my diploma in advertising writing and got a job with Charles,” he says. “He ran a creative consultancy called Cramersaatchi, with his art director, Ross Cramer. In 1970, Ross went off to become a commercials director. Charles brought Maurice in from Haymarket, and Cramersaatchi became Saatchi & Saatchi.”

Before then, however, Sinclair and his art director Bill Atherton came up with the idea for Pregnant Man – which gave Saatchi the opportunity to show off his flair for PR. The ad was only ever intended for use in doctors’ waiting rooms, but Saatchi ensured it got wider coverage. “He sussed getting PR through advertising,” says Sinclair in our piece (which subscribers can read here). “The Pregnant Man became famous not for being an ad, it became famous by getting editorial. Charles worked that out early on. By getting it into Time magazine it (and we) became famous.”

It alsow won a Yellow Pencil at the 1970 D&AD Awards. The photographer, by the way, was Alan Brooking

 

 

Related Content

Read the first post on this series, on Barrie Bates’ 1963 A union, Jack! poster, here

And the second post, on Derek BIrdsall’s covers for Penguin books, here

And the third, on the Go to Work on an Egg ad campaign here

And on the 1966 British Rail identity here

1968 Doctor Who titles here

 

D&AD’s 50-year timeline of landmark work is here

The 50th D&AD Awards are open for entry until the February 1

 

 

 

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