Elmwood re-brands Goal

Design agency Elmwood has created a sleek new identity for football news and fixtures website Goal.

Design agency Elmwood has created a sleek new identity for football news and fixtures website Goal.

The new logo (above) features the brand name in bold white type inside goal posts, with a TM symbol in the top right corner that looks like a football. The .com used in the old logo (below) has been dropped, as has the tagline ‘Score to live’.

The Goal website has also been re-designed – the red, blue, black and white colour scheme has been replaced with navy, white, green and grey and the new layout is cleaner and less cluttered. The new look launched in the UK yesterday and will be rolled out across Goal’s 36 international sites this month.

The re-brand is part of a plan to enhance Goal’s mobile and digital offerings ahead of the 2014 World Cup and re-define it as a multi-platform digital brand. Goal’s mobile app, widgets and social media will be given a short-term makeover and will eventually be re-designed to match the new site.

Elmwood has also created a book and short film to communicate the brand’s new vision and values to Goal’s 500 editorial staff around the world. The book is designed to promote editorial consistency and includes infographics and brand ‘red cards’ (below).

“We started by creating a strong brand blueprint for Goal and defining exactly what it stands for – which is being a definitive, authoritative source of football news,” says Simon Morrow, a senior designer at Elmwood’s Leeds office who worked on the project.

“For the website, we wanted to create a look that would be timeless and would work in every territory, so we tried to keep things simple and understated,” he adds. Keen to avoid team associations, Elmwood opted for neutral but vibrant colours.

“People are passionate about football and bold primary colours have strong club ties. We had to do a lot of research into team colours and avoid any that were too bright or too closely linked to a particular team. We liked the idea of using green, but wanted to avoid using a cliched ‘grass green’, so chose an emerald shade instead,” he explains.

Designing a logo that would be instantly recognisable in multiple territories was also a challenge, which is why Elmwood opted for a striking visual symbol.

“Goal is a universal term but as it’s spelled and pronounced differently around the world, we needed something that would work in any language. We spent a lot of time looking at iconic logos – such as Target’s and Apple’s – and decided we had to create a similarly intuitive visual symbol,” he says.

It’s a strong identity and a major improvement on Goal’s old look. By keeping design minimal and choosing colours wisely, Elmwood has created an editorial site that’s enjoyable to read and a distinctive brand identity in a competitive market.

Pink Floyd fans may recognise the cover of our June issue. It’s the original marked-up artwork for Dark Side of the Moon: one of a number of treasures from the archive of design studio Hipgnosis featured in the issue, along with an interview with Aubrey Powell, co-founder of Hipgnosis with the late, great Storm Thorgerson. Elsewhere in the issue we take a first look at The Purple Book: Symbolism and Sensuality in Contemporary Illustration, hear from the curators of a fascinating new V&A show conceived as a ‘walk-in book’ plus we have all the regular debate and analysis on the world of visual communications.

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