Get your CR/Uniqlo T-shirt here

Creative Review has teamed up with Uniqlo and 12 more magazines and journals around the world in the UT Creative Journal Direction project. Each magazine has commissioned a local designer or artist to create a T-shirt for the range which is on sale in Uniqlo worldwide

Creative Review has teamed up with Uniqlo and 12 more magazines and journals around the world in the UT Creative Journal Direction project. Each magazine has commissioned a local designer or artist to create a T-shirt for the range which is on sale in Uniqlo worldwide

Each year Uniqlo commissions limited edition T-shirts from designers, artists and brands under its UT Project for sale in its 1300 shops globally and online at uniqlo.com. The UT Creative Journal Direction project was organised by +81 magazine in Japan.

Each participating magazine (including Étapes in France, Surface in New York, Design in Korea and Look At Me in Moscow) was asked to submit half a dozen proposed designs. They were not allowed to be overtly self-promotional (ie no logos) and should feature the work of a local designer. We submitted various ideas, but +81 and Uniqlo chose Anthony Burrill’s reworked version of the image which he created for our April 2010 redesign issue.The final shirt is shown above

You can buy the CR T-shirt direct from us here

Other T-shirts in the range include this by Superscript from Etapes

This by Masayoshi Kodaira for +81

And this by Workroom for Design magazine in Korea

See the full range of shirts here

CR in print
The March issue of CR magazine celebrates 150 years of the London Underground. In it we introduce a new book by Mark Ovenden, which is the first study of all aspects of the tube’s design evolution; we ask Harry Beck authority, Ken Garland, what he makes of a new tube map concept by Mark Noad; we investigate the enduring appeal of Edward Johnston’s eponymous typeface; Michael Evamy reports on the design story of world-famous roundel; we look at the London Transport Museum’s new exhibition of 150 key posters from its archive; we explore the rich history of platform art, and also the Underground’s communications and advertising, past and present. Plus, we talk to London Transport Museum’s head of trading about TfL’s approach to brand licensing and merchandising. In Crit, Rick Poynor reviews Branding Terror, a book about terrorist logos, while Paul Belford looks at how a 1980 ad managed to do away with everything bar a product demo. Finally, Daniel Benneworth-Grey reflects on the merits on working home alone. Buy your copy here.

Please note, CR now has a limited presence on the newsstand at WH Smith high street stores (although it can still be found in WH Smith travel branches at train stations and airports). If you cannot find a copy of CR in your town, your WH Smith store or a local independent newsagent can order it for you. You can search for your nearest stockist here. Alternatively, call us on 020 7970 4878, or buy a copy direct from us. Based outside the UK? Simply call +44(0)207 970 4878 to find your nearest stockist. Better yet, subscribe to CR for a year here and save yourself almost 30% on the printed magazine.

CR for the iPad
Read in-depth features and analysis plus exclusive iPad-only content in the Creative Review iPad App. Longer, more in-depth features than we run on the blog, portfolios of great, full-screen images and hi-res video. If the blog is about news, comment and debate, the iPad is about inspiration, viewing and reading. As well as providing exclusive, iPad-only content, the app will also update with new content throughout each month.

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Creative Lead

Clarks
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