Handmade in London

Images from Julian Love’s Handmade London project feature in our current Photography Annual issue and the photographer has just launched the accompanying book, which contains some great pictures of contemporary artisanal activity

James Kennedy, Kennedy City Bicycles

Images from Julian Love’s Handmade London project feature in our current Photography Annual issue and the photographer has just launched the accompanying book, which contains some great pictures of contemporary artisanal activity…

The personal project, which Love finished shooting in October, has been made into a limited edition letterpress book featuring 14 people from the series.

The book is designed and illustrated by Helen Mair with letterpress and hand-stitching by Simon Goode of the London Centre for Book Arts, who also features inside the book.

Photographed in their studios and workshops, the subjects include James Kennedy (at top of post), a Clapton-based bike builder (he makes ten bikes a week); smokery owner Ole Hansen of Hansen & Lydersen; and Rob Court of bespoke neon lighting company, Creative Neon.

The complete series to date can be seen at Love’s website, handmade-london.com; shown here are eight examples of modern-day craftsmen and women who make things the old fashioned way.

Naomi Paul, Naomi Paul Ltd

Daniel Harris, London Cloth Company

Jessica de Lotz, Jessica de Lotz Jewellery

Michael Ruh, Michael Ruh Studio

Marco Lawrence, Print Club London

Camilla Goddard, Capital Bee

Simon Goode, London Centre for Book Arts

Further images of the book are here. See handmade-london.com. Julian Love is represented by the Lisa Pritchard agency.

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