Jean-Pierre Khazem in Japan

French artist Jean-Pierre Khazem is currently exhibiting a combination of artworks and editorial photography at Butterfly Stroke Inc in Tokyo…

French artist Jean-Pierre Khazem is currently exhibiting a combination of artworks and editorial photography at Butterfly Stroke Inc in Tokyo…

 

Khazem is largely known for his editorial and advertising photography for the likes of The Face, Diesel and Camper. His work is distinguished by his habit of using wild masks or resin heads in lieu of the models’ faces, giving his photography a witty, surreal edge.

The Tokyo show includes a number of his early photographs, shown above, alongside a set of recent prints featuring bizarre new characters (below).

 

Also on show is a series of Khazem’s hand-made glass head sculptures, as previously seen in a number of his photographs. Examples of these are shown below, and at the top of this post. All works are for sale.

 

The exhibition is up until September 26. More info is at shopbtf.com.

 

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