Karlsson Wilker in South Africa

The organisers of the Design Indaba conference asked NY design studio Karlsson Wilker to spend ten days in South Africa, creating a new piece of work each day in reaction to what they saw on their travels…

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The organisers of the Design Indaba conference asked NY design studio Karlsson Wilker to spend ten days in South Africa, creating a new piece of work each day in reaction to what they saw on their travels…

Hjalti Karlsson and Jan Wilker started their journey in Johannesburg, then drove to Durban and flew on to Cape Town. In between they conducted several workshops in townships as part of a programme run by design school Vega.

Day one’s image deconstructed the symbol of Joburg to read in one of two ways, first past, then future:

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Day two. The idea was to have a pot made based on the shape of the HIV virus, referring to its ever-presence in SA lives. The pot didn’t turn out so well so they used this photo montage instead:

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Day three, a well-observed satire on enduring realities in SA as witnessed on the road to Durban:

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Day 4. South Africa: it’s all about guns and meat:

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Day 5, obligatory Mandela reference:

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Day 6:

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Day 7:

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Day 8, using traditional patterns as a basis for inforgraphics:

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Day 9, inspired by a trip to the botanical gardens near Cape Town:

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And, finally, Day 10, a visit to the sea life centre:

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situation 9, 2007
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