Kingston University Graphic Design 2012

Following my visit to Brighton’s Graphics and Illustration show in Hackney, I popped over to the Dray Walk Gallery on Brick Lane to see the Graphic Design graduate work from Kingston University this year. Here are my picks of the show.

Following my visit to Brighton’s Graphics and Illustration show in Hackney, I popped over to the Dray Walk Gallery on Brick Lane to see the Graphic Design graduate work from Kingston University this year. Here are my picks of the show.

First up is Leanne Bentley‘s typographic response to closed down buildings. “The hoarding acts as a forum for the local community to share their memories of the building at its former glory,” says Bentley.

A number of the projects were conceptual in nature. For example, Signe Emma created a series of images by scanning electron micrographs of dissolved salt in order to represent the way that the aircraft environment diminishes our ability to taste the condiment. The resulting images appear like the view from a plane.

Lucy Warden presented a text modelled in ice, in order to show how disfluent type is easier to recall. Shown below is an image of the type freshly frozen:

And here it is at the time I viewed the show:

George Voke is showing a set of type guides produced to “establish a united typographic voice”.

Christopher Benson‘s striking photograph shows a businessman hanging upside down, in a response to the current economic crisis.

Aaron Merrigan created this woven work in honour of Ceefax, which ceased to exist after 38 years when the digital switchover took place.

Fred North drew and created a set of temporary tattoos to show his commitment to various footie teams, which he also gave out at the show.

Jessica Nesbeth has created an analogue machine to demonstrate the different pitches of British accents. The film below shows it in action:

Richard MacVicar is displaying a typography gag in his work, which features an eye test that challenges designers to notice the difference between the two typefaces, Arial and Helvetica. Only those who are successful have the right to mock the less popular Arial.

Tamara Elmallah presents a series of Olympics posters that emphasises the overcrowding that awaits London during the Games. The posters are a progression by Elmallah of the poster project that CR editor Patrick Burgoyne and Kingston Graphics course leader Rebecca Wright set the students (see the other posters here).

Ran Park is showing the results of three typographic experiments. The source material was taken by Park from the quotes of three contrasting modern graphic designers, Jonathan Barnbrook, Angus Hyland and Anthony Burrill.

Charlie Borley uses bingo as her inspiration for a series of graphic works.

Josh King has come up with an unusual way to represent the Olympics: by showing models of various sports in bottles.

We finish with a great project from Felix Heyes & Ben West, who have created a book showing the first Google image result for every word in the dictionary.

The Kingston University Graphics show will be on at Dray Walk Gallery in London until Monday (July 9). More info on the work can be found online at takeshape2012.com.

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