Lance Wyman in Norwich

Remember when the Olympics produced great graphic design? Norwich University College of the Arts is hosting an exhibition of the work of Lance Wyman which includes his Mexico 1968 logotype and other examples of the Olympic graphics programme Wyman worked on

Lance Wyman at the launch of his show, You Are Here, at The Gallery at NUCA. Photo: Finola Gaynor

Remember when the Olympics produced great graphic design? Norwich University College of the Arts is hosting an exhibition of the work of US designer Lance Wyman which includes his Mexico 1968 logotype and other examples of the Olympic graphics programme Wyman worked on

In 1966, the US designer Lance Wyman moved to Mexico City to work on the graphic design programme for the 1968 Olympics. Under the direction of head of the organising committee Pedro Ramírez Vásquez, Wyman developed the Op Art-influenced logotype for the games that has become one of the most revered Olympics logos ever produced.

The logotype has pride of place at You Are Here, a show of Wyman’s work curated by Finola Gaynor at The Gallery at Norwich University College of the Arts. As well as the logotype, Wyman developed the application of the 68 Games’ graphic language into sports pictograms (above), icons for cultural events and services and was part of a team that created one of the strongest Olympic graphics programmes ever devised, referencing pre-Hispanic design and Mexican folk art alongside its more modern touch points.

Guests at the You Are Here launch pore over CR’s feature on Wyman from June 2006.

After the Olympics finished, Wyman and his wife, who also worked on the Olympics programme, stayed on in Mexico until 1971. There Wyman created a variety of influential work including a logo and signage system for the Mexico City subway, the 1970 World Cup and the MARCO museum in Monterrey (which can be seen on Wyman’s website).

Lance Wyman started his own studio, in New York City, in 1980 where his work has included identities for the Minnesota Zoo, wayfinding for the city of Calgary and the Papalote Children’s Museum in Mexico City.

You Are Here is on until June 9. Admission is free. Details here


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