London 2012 Olympic posters unveiled

A host of British artists, including Bridget Riley, Tracey Emin, Martin Creed, Rachel Whiteread, and Bob and Roberta Smith, have designed posters to celebrate the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Any gold medal winners?

A host of British artists, including Bridget Riley, Tracey Emin, Martin Creed, Rachel Whiteread, and Bob and Roberta Smith, have designed posters to celebrate the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Any gold medal winners?

UPDATE: Read our folow-up post on the posters here

The posters were unveiled at Tate Britain in London along with the programme for the London 2012 Festival. The full list of contributing artists are Fiona Banner, Michael Craig-Martin, Martin Creed, Tracey Emin, Anthea Hamilton, Howard Hodgkin, Gary Hume, Sarah Morris, Chris Ofili, Bridget Riley, Bob and Roberta Smith, and Rachel Whiteread.

 

Here are the six Olympic posters:

 

 

And here are the Paralympic posters:

 

The images will go on show in a free exhibition as part of the London 2012 Festival next summer and they will also be used as part of a high profile campaign to promote the 2012 Games.

Posters (£7 each) will be available to buy from 3pm today via london2012.com/shop. Limited edition prints will also be for sale individually and as a boxed set from Counter Editions who can be emailed on london 2012@countereditions.com for more details.

In 1972, the organisers of the Munich Olympics ran a similar (and very successful) enterprise. Like these posters, artists were asked to respond to the idea of the games and celebrate them, not produce pieces of visual communications promoting the games per se. You can see the posters produced (by the likes of Josef Albers, David Hockney and Max Bill)  here

UPDATE: Read our folow-up post on the posters here

 


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