Mapping London

Charles Booth’s Descriptive Map of London Poverty, published in 1889, revealed that over a third of Londoners lived in poverty. It was colour-coded to indicate the levels of poverty and prosperity street by street. While the red colouring showed the habitat of the “well-to-do, middle class”, pale blue and dark blue revealed the areas inhabited by the “poor” and “very poor” respectively. Here, the black area in the centre (Bethnal Green) contained the “lowest class; vicious, semi-criminal.”
The British Library’s show, London: A Life in Maps, ends this weekend. If you haven’t been down (it’s free) we wholly recommend a trip over to Euston Road. The exhibition traces how the capital has been depicted since the earliest images of the walled City in the 1550s. On show are some of the earliest examples of wayfinding – the ancestry of the London A-Z if you like. While many of the cruder, hand drawn maps offer up a somewhat distorted vision of a growing city (often for political reasons), the large-scale, engraved depictions of the capital are astoundingly accurate and detailed.

Hackney
Charles Booth’s Descriptive Map of London Poverty, published in 1889, revealed that over a third
of Londoners lived in poverty. It was colour-coded to indicate the levels of poverty and prosperity
street by street. While the red colouring showed the habitat of the “well-to-do, middle class”, pale
blue and dark blue revealed the areas inhabited by the “poor” and “very poor” respectively. Here,
the black area in the centre (Bethnal Green) contained the “lowest class; vicious, semi-criminal.”

The British Library’s show, ‘target=”_blank”>London: A Life in Maps is at the British Library until the 4th of March. The

More from CR

Label of Love

Motive Sounds is a young, independent record label based in Carlisle. While fully embracing digital music culture, their sleeve designs owe more to a desire to make tactile objects and maintain a local, handmade aesthetic. Mark Sinclair spoke to the founders

Promos of the week

It’s high time that we shared some of the music video brilliance that has been sent into Creative Review towers over the last couple of weeks. First up is some lovely animation by Louis-Philippe Eno for The Hidden Cameras’ Death of a Tune.

Death Is Not The End

Iconic figures from the arts and science are becoming brands from beyond the grave, ready to lend their lustre to your project

Deadly Designs

Photographers Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s new collection of work examines some of the myths surrounding contemporary Israel where, quite often, things aren’t really as they first appear. A series of mundane objects – a melon, a beer can, a rock, for example – in fact turn out to be bombs or, rather, re-creations of bombs made by the Israeli Police Force’s Bomb Disposal Unit (based on the designs used in actual attacks) and now housed in their informal museum in Jerusalem which reveals when and where they were used and how many people were injured or killed.

IIASA_115x115

Graphic Designer

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
Centaur_115x115

Integrated Designer

Centaur Media