Modern art is rubbish

If you have any art you don’t want, or perhaps want to see that art transformed into another kind of art, then over at the South London gallery there’s a giant Art Bin for your needs, courtesy of artist Michael Landy

If you have any art you don’t want, or perhaps want to see that art transformed into another kind of art, then over at the South London gallery there’s a giant Art Bin for your needs, courtesy of artist Michael Landy…

Landy famously disposed of all of his possessions in 2001 in his piece, Break Down, so is no stranger to creating a statement from the art of destruction.

It’s also a well established artistic (or at least cathartic) process: John Baldessari cremated the majority of his early paintings in the late 1960s, only to have the ashes form part of a conceptual piece that initiated a new direction in his art.

In Landy’s project, anyone can apply to dispose of an art work or two, but only those pieces accepted by him or his representative will be allowed in the Art Bin; a 600 square metre “monument to creative failure”, as the artist puts it. 

Of course – there are also some fairly extensive liability clauses on the Art Bin website, just in case A Well Known Artist isn’t too keen on seeing their work binned. Pieces by Gillian Wareing, Michael Craig-Martin, David Hockney and Gary Hume have apparently already made it in. 

According to the Art Bin press release, Landy’s project will examine the notion of perceived and actual value, the issues of authorship and ownership, as well as the significance of our emotional attachment to art. 

From January 29 until March 14, artworks can be brought to the South London Gallery during Tuesday to Saturday (12-6pm). 

Visit the Art Bin site for more information on how to dispose of your unwanted art. The submission form is here.

Michael Landy on his Break Down project (2001) – where he dismantled and shredded everything he owned:

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