Muji to Go

In the Muji to Go campaign, one family will win a trip to their dream destination on ANA airlines, and will be met at their destination by a 3D-printed miniature version of themselves

In the Muji to Go campaign, one family will win a trip to their dream destination on ANA airlines, and will be met at their destination by a 3D-printed miniature version of themselves

Last December, Japanese creative agency Party wowed the creative world with its Omote 3D project which used full-body scanning and 3D printing to create miniature 3D models of people (see above) visiting a pop-up photo booth in Tokyo. Party subsequently revealed that it would be attempting to exploit the idea for clients, which it has now done in the Muji to Go campaign, a collaboration between the retailer and airline ANA.

Customers spending over the equivalent of $30 in branches in Tokyo, Osaka Shanghai and New York before August 15 will be able to enter a competition to have their family turned into miniature 3D models. Ten winners will be scanned in-store and receive the models three months later.

One overall winner gets to take a trip to the destination of their choice. They will be scanned at the airport and met at their destination by their miniature selves.

In addition, customers will be able to take 3D images of themselves in-store and share them via smartphones.

 

There has been a lot of talk from agencies about trying to exploit their IP so it’s interesting to see an example of this working in practice. Party developed this idea for a self-initiated project and has now been able to put it to commercial use with a client. It will be intriguing to see where they can take it from here.

 

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