Music, Sweet Music

Boy Scout Recordings sampler CD and patch, designed by Paul Flack
We’ve seen some lovely music-related artwork land on our desks this week at CR towers, which is great, though slightly frustrating as our July issue, complete with Music Showcase section has gone to press (it’s out in the shops this week). So we thought we’d post up some of the things that won’t appear in the magazine, but that we really like. Please note some of the content in this post is not “work safe”…

We’ve seen some lovely music-related artwork land on our desks this week at CR towers, which is great, though slightly frustrating as our July issue, complete with Music Showcase section has gone to press (it’s out in the shops this week). So we thought we’d post up some of the things that won’t appear in the magazine, but that we really like. Please note some of the content in this post is not “work safe”…

Boy Scout Recordings sampler CD

Boy Scout Recordings is a brand new label from the people that run Tummy Touch records. Designer Paul Flack has created a suitably nostalgic illustrated style – not to mention a scout-master portrait of a logo – for the label and even some sew-on patches to promote acts on the label in an appropriately boy scout style. Shown above is the artork for a label sampler, called Thrifty, Brave and Clean – which the label kindly sent us.

Groove Armade album sleeve by eBoy

There have been many eBoy pretenders over the last six or seven years, but when the real masters of pixel-based illustration stand up, it’s clear that they’re still the best. Above is the artwork for Groove Armada‘s new album, Soundboy Rock. Take the CD artwork from the jewel case and it unfolds to become eight times the size – with an eBoy portrait of Groove Armada’s Tom Findlay and Andy Cato on one side and a typically eBoy city-scape on the reverse, comprising a Miami-style beach party scene (which also featured as the artwork for their first single from the album, Get Down, shown below) and some pixel-rendered London land-mark buildings.

Groove Armade Get Down artwork by eBoy

Chemical Brothers album sleeve by Tappin Gofton
Tappin Gofton has designed and art directed the sleeve for We Are The Night, the new album by The Chemical Brothers. This is actually the promo version – which we like very much!

TVPOPMUZIK sleeve by James Joyce

Designer and illustrator James Joyce of One Fine Day created this, the sleeve of forthcoming album of work by The Daniel Pemberton TV Orchestra. Daniel Pemberton creates music for such TV dinner classics as Bad Lads Army, Hell’s Kitchen and the rather more credible Peep Show (to name but a few of the myriad programmes he provides music for) BUT, the tracks are presented not in their as-they-appear-on-the-telly form but actually as well-crafted pop tunes. No vocals though. Which isn’t a bad thing at all as the charts continue to be bombarded with a new wave of MySpace “singers” that really are, let’s face it, fucking terrible.

James Jarvis CD pack for Juno

This (above) is the box containing the double CD pack for Hong Kong-based singer, Juno‘s new album, Chapel Of Dawn on the Silly Thing label. The box, illustrated by James Jarvis, opens like a traditional cigarette pack thus:

James Jarvis CD pack for Juno
… and inside you get this stuff:
James Jarvis CD pack for Juno

Jarvis tells us that a toy of the two characters that appear on the sleeve will be produced by Amos and made available by the end of the year. They’ll be wrestling. Perhaps like this:

James Jarvis CD pack for Juno

Paul Woolford Body Double EP
This is the rather saucy illustrated sleeve of the promo version of dance music DJ Paul Woolford’s Body Double EP – the first release on Woolford’s brand new label, Intimacy. When released commercially, the thinking is that this illustration will adorn the inner, rather than the outer sleeve. Which, depending on your disposition, may save some blushes at the record shop counter… Design and art direction: Trevor Jackson. Illustration by Tom Poulton.

More from CR

D&AD Student winners

Above is Student of the Year (from University College for the Creative Arts at Farnham) Scott Evans’ extensively researched music video The Clock – which details the detrimental footprint of everything he does, looking at fuel emissions, laptop manufacturing processes and more, much more…
Last week D&AD announced the winners of this year’s student awards. We’ve made a selection of work that took first prizes below…

Cannes 07: This Used To Be A Football Club…

“Manchester United is pleased to invite brand, marketing and communications leaders to a relaxed drinks occasion in the presence of their legendary manager, Sir Alex Ferguson CBE”.
So read a full-page ad in yesterday’s edition of Lions Daily, the Cannes advertising festival newspaper. Perhaps irked by Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich ‘s conspicuous swanning about on his super yacht, the self-styled “world’s greatest football club” now have a big boat of their own, and they have parked it in Cannes for the duration of the ad festival.

Wolff Olins: Epilepsy 2012 Film Not Us

Earlier today, London Mayor Ken Livingstone was reported to have called on the London 2012 organisers to withhold payment from design consultancy Wolff Olins for their work on the 2012 brand after a film (above) showing an animated version of the logo had to be taken down from the 2012 websiite following complaints that it triggered epileptic fits. Only trouble is, we can exclusively reveal, Wolff Olins didn’t make the film.

The Rise of the Twee

McEwans Lager ad featuring You’ve Got the Power by Win (agency: Collett Dickenson Pearce, 1986)
As an adult, it’s rare to be frightened by an advert. But back in the mid-80s, I remember one TV ad scaring the living shit out of me (shown above). I can recall everything about it: the zombie-like characters, the concept of pushing giant balls up neverending steps and the stirring music that seemed to suit the desolate tone perfectly. It was immersive, gripping and (for me) pretty pant-soiling stuff. But ads don’t employ this aesthetic anymore: they don’t want to scare you. In fact they do the complete opposite – they’re frequently soft, fluffy, handmade-looking things for products that just want to be your friend. And invariably, the choice of music or soundtrack follows suit: arpeggiated acoustic guitar? Check. Softly spoken, whimsical vocals? Check. These are prerequisites in advertising’s obsession with the sound of twee.

Senior Creative Designer

Monddi Design Agency

Head of Digital Content

Red Sofa London