Myerscough and Morgan in Mexico

In the latest super colourful Superstudio project, Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan have built a giant camera obscura in the heart of Mexico City

Myerscough and Morgan have applied their plywood and scaffolding aesthetic to sites including London’s South Bank, Stockholm and Birmingham. Their latest project is the construction of MIRAR – Ways of Seeing, a giant camera obscura built in Zocalo Square, the huge piazza in the centre of Mexico City. It was commissioned by the Abierto Mexicano de Diseño Festival and the British Council.

Myers cough and Morgan's sketch for MIRAR
Myers cough and Morgan’s sketch for MIRAR
Creating the multicoloured panels for MIRAR
Creating the multicoloured panels for MIRAR
Creating the multicoloured panels for MIRAR
Creating the multicoloured panels for MIRAR

“We were thinking about how we approach our work. We concluded that for us it is about seeing and thinking about things in many different ways from every angle, to turn it upside down, back to front, inside out, deconstruct and reconstruct,” Myerscough says. “But this is only possible if you allow your mind to be open and embrace the unknown.”

The MIRAR installation in Zocalo Square
The MIRAR installation in Zocalo Square

The pair wanted to give Mexico City residents a fresh perspective on a very familiar landmark in order to encourage them to look anew at their surroundings. “We have made a raised platform so people can immediately start having different views in a square they may be very familiar with but have not see it from that position or angle before,” Myerscough says. “The swing underneath the platform allows people to spend time looking at the Square whilst taking part in an activity that is not familiar to the Square.”

Myerscough on-site
Myerscough on-site using the swing
The finished MIRAR installation
The finished MIRAR installation
Detail of MIRAR installation
Detail of MIRAR installation
MIRAR installation
MIRAR installation
Detail of MIRAR installation
Detail of MIRAR installation

Inside the structure is a completely black room which uses the camera obscure technique to project images of the square onto its walls. “This obscura process occurs naturally with out any modern technology, as if the visitor is inside someone else’s giant eye,” Myerscough says. “By sharing this unexpected view people may see things they would normally dismiss or ignore for one reason or another.”

As with the pair’s previous installations, MIRAR is made from a mixture of handpainted ply and scaffolding. After use the sheets of ply will be donated to a local school.

The MIRAR from a surrounding street
The MIRAR from a surrounding street

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