Paul Davis and Patrick Vale’s film mural for Picturehouse

The recently-opened Picturehouse multiplex in London’s Piccadilly has unveiled a huge mural and cinematic timeline created by artists Paul Davis and Patrick Vale

The recently-opened Picturehouse multiplex in London’s Piccadilly has unveiled a huge mural and cinematic timeline created by artists Paul Davis and Patrick Vale

Davis and Vale were commissioned by Martin Brudnizki Studio to create a mural for the new Picturehouse Central cinema which opened in June this year. The pair were given a very open brief and, according to Davis, decided to reject the more familiar imagery associated with cinema, such as film stars, famous quotes and poster art.

Instead, Davis and Vale took the notion of how films are made as their starting point – hence the abundance of machinery and tech, film slang and images of the people behind the scenes in their drawings.

 

Davis says there are also plenty of “imaginary conversations based on the nature of reacting to a trip to the cinema and the critical disagreements that occur“.

All of the work is hung on an “interlocking film timeline” which begins at the ‘big bang’ (“where light was invented”, says Davis) and loops its way via Aristotle, Eadweard Muybridge and the Lumière brothers, through to commercial flow-charts, lens behaviour and sound design diagrams before finally ending up in the digital age.

Picturehouse Central is on the corner of Great Windmill Street and Shaftesbury Avenue in London, W1D 7DH. See copyrightdavis.com and patrickvale.co.uk. All images © 2015 davis/vale. Photography by Davy Jones

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