Please draw a chair

Kingston University students Jack Beveridge and Joshua Lake held an art lesson with a class of seven and eight year-olds at a local school and asked each of the children to draw a chair. They then picked two and had them made

Kingston University students Jack Beveridge and Joshua Lake held an art lesson with a class of seven and eight year-olds at a local school and asked each of the children to draw a chair. They then picked two and had them made…

Turning children’s drawings into three-dimensional objects has seemingly caught the imagination of a few parents recently, with services such as Crayon Creatures and Stuffed Drawings now available to offer rendered figurines and stitched versions of prized paper art.

But for their latest project, Beveridge and Lake (the latter of the ingesting-film experiment we blogged about in May last year) held a class at St John’s Church of England Primary School in Kingston, Surrey, in which they gave each of the children a piece of paper and asked them to ‘please draw a chair’.

“With a little encouragement and some colouring in pencils, the children started scribbling away their dream chair,” says Beveridge. “After an hour, we had the most beautiful selection of designs.” Over the next couple of weeks the designers selected two of their favourites and built them.

The results include a red and green ‘Deniss the Menace’ edition and a rather fine bright yellow rocking chair, complete with goldfish bowl (some construction shots are featured below).

The designers say that they plan to produce more editions in the future. See jackbeveridge.com and joshua-lake.com.

And here are a few more of the children’s drawings of their dream chairs. Love the fruit one.

Pink Floyd fans may recognise the cover of our June issue. It’s the original marked-up artwork for Dark Side of the Moon: one of a number of treasures from the archive of design studio Hipgnosis featured in the issue, along with an interview with Aubrey Powell, co-founder of Hipgnosis with the late, great Storm Thorgerson. Elsewhere in the issue we take a first look at The Purple Book: Symbolism and Sensuality in Contemporary Illustration, hear from the curators of a fascinating new V&A show conceived as a ‘walk-in book’ plus we have all the regular debate and analysis on the world of visual communications.

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