Protest via PDF and printer

As one commenter pointed out in our post on the newspaper designed for Occupy London, the visual material of protest is often rooted in the means of production available. Reflective of the fact that modern movements are organised online and on-screen, freetoprotest.org aims to offer graphic support to a host of different causes

As one commenter pointed out in our post on the newspaper designed for Occupy London, the visual material of protest is often rooted in the means of production available. Reflective of the fact that modern movements are organised online and on-screen, freetoprotest.org aims to offer graphic support to a host of different causes…

Launched today, Free to Protest supplies visual material for protest marches and demonstrations. Visitors to freetoprotest.org can select a particular movement or cause from a drop down menu (at the moment it features only the Occupy movement) and from there choose from a range of slogans set in 12 different coloured discs. Click on one of the 192 options and it downloads as a PDF, which can be printed off to make badges, signs, t-shirts or posters.

As a resource, it’s simple, quick to use and will benefit those without the skills or equipment to create bold graphics. Of course, effective protest depends upon good organisation and the distribution of a clear message, so designers have a vital role to play in the process.

But protesters have always found ways to create striking imagery without the hand of the designer. Kristopher Rae’s short film of the sheer range of placards and signs on display in New York’s Foley Square in October is testament to that.

 

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