Question of the Week 08.09.09

It’s a new QOTW and we want to know whether our readers are bloggers too. Is everyone at it, or is there always a time and a place? If you blog, why do you do it? What do you blog about?

It’s a new QOTW and we want to know whether our readers are bloggers too. Is everyone at it, or is there always a time and a place? If you blog, why do you do it? What do you blog about?

Here at CR, we’ve been blogging since August 2006 and have clocked in well over 1,200 posts. 

We love it. It offers us an immediate platform for news stories but, at the same time, provides us with near infinite space to show images (or run long interviews) that we simply don’t have room for in the printed magazine.

Our blog also acts as a place where we can interact directly with readers and instigate – and, on occasion, moderate – debate.

I think the CR editors would agree that we write slightly differently on the CR blog, to when writing for the magazine, and that we all enjoy that very aspect of it.

For e.g, this post took about ten minutes to put together; it has an immediacy to it that, hopefully, will be reflected in the comments it receives throughout the day (as with other Questions of the Week).

So, if you blog too, why do you do it? Does it have a purpose in your working life, or is it purely a recreational thing?

If you just enjoy reading blogs, which ones do you like and why? What makes a good blog?

Are there even too many blogs out there? How do you cut through the mass of voices and focus in on the good stuff?

What about Twitter, or the future of blogging. Where are things going? 

Let us know what you think. And, of course, include any links to great blogs, your own or otherwise, that we should check out.

Question of the Week is produced in partnership with MajorPlayers

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