Architecture

Myerscough and Morgan in Mexico

In the latest super colourful Superstudio project, Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan have built a giant camera obscura in the heart of Mexico City

Inside Benetton’s archive

Part showroom, part museum and part archive, Benetton Studios presents a fascinating history of the brand

Ten things to see at The World of Charles and Ray Eames

The Barbican’s new Charles and Ray Eames retrospective offers a fascinating look at the Eames’ visual communications and moving image work as well as their furniture and exhibition design. We pick out ten things to see, from slideshows to letters, sketches and magazine covers…

Live small: Japanese housing design

Restrictions on size, alongside a long list of legal restrictions, has led Japan to adopt some weird and wonderful architectural solutions in its housing, as Jutaku, a new book from Phaidon showcases…

Assemble’s Granby Four Streets: this year’s Turner Prize winner?

Inventive and thought-provoking, the Granby Four Streets project from Assemble stands out in the Turner Prize shortlist. Antonia Wilson talks to the London-based collective at Glasgow’s Tramway, inside their installation – a monument to renovation and a showroom for their beautiful handcrafted homewares

Open architecture

Imagine a homebuilding system that can be used by anyone, without the need for specialist knowledge; where a kit of parts can be ordered and built on site. In the WikiHouse, architect Alastair Parvin may just have the answer – and it’s one that has the potential to not only democratise architecture but also help fight the housing crisis. Parvin’s idea is an open source home, built for everyone

Constructed realities

Advances in technology have made sophisticated computer design and visualisation tools — once the preserve of the manufacturing industries — available to all at little cost. But what does this mean for the built environment we live in, or how we fit out our homes? Like the gale howling outside the lighthouse, the breakneck speed of technological progress has become such a feature of our lives that we barely notice it any more: the tape collection of recorded music that now fits on a flash drive smaller than your thumb, or the drawings, once painstakingly produced and rolled into tubes to be picked up by couriers, now outputted via PDF and sent over email.

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SENIOR DESIGNER

Central London