Selfridges’ Kaleidoscopic windows

Design: Emily Forgot
Apparently inspired by the cut-and-paste aesthetic of the sadly defunct Amelia’s magazine and the illustrations of Alan Aldridge, Selfridges’ in-house design team unveiled the store’s colourful new windows earlier this month. The windows also received a makeover from illustrator Emily Forgot and RCA student Matthew Plummer Fernandez, whose previous Selfridges installation we featured, here. (All photography: Andrew Meredith)…


Design: Emily Forgot

Apparently inspired by the cut-and-paste aesthetic of the sadly defunct Amelia‘s magazine and the illustrations of Alan Aldridge, Selfridges’ in-house design team unveiled the store’s colourful new windows earlier this month. The windows also received a makeover from illustrator Emily Forgot and RCA student Matthew Plummer Fernandez, whose previous Selfridges installation we featured, here. (All photography: Andrew Meredith)…


Design: Emily Forgot. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Emily Forgot. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Emily Forgot. Photo: Andrew Meredith

The windows on the store’s Orchard Street side were designed by illustrator (and CR March cover designer) Emily Forgot.

The large corner window that meets Oxford Street was designed by RCA student, Matthew Plummer Fernandez, while The Duke Street and Oxford Street windows were were designed in-house by the 3D creative team’s concept maganer Sarah McCullough and graphic visualiser Michael Ryley.


Design: Emily Forgot. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Emily Forgot. Photo: Andrew Meredith

“Being the pioneers of creative window display I was incredibly excited to be asked to develop four windows,” says Emily Forgot. “After talking through with them their exciting concept for Oxford Street, I took on board their kaleidoscopic infuences, added a dash of the surreal, and Zoot Allure was born.”


Design: Sarah McCullough and Michael Ryley. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Sarah McCullough and Michael Ryley. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Sarah McCullough and Michael Ryley. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Sarah McCullough and Michael Ryley. Photo: Andrew Meredith

Plummer Fernandez’ installation, Fourfootfalls, presents a landscape of white poles of varying lengths. The ceiling of the window houses four drip devices, which are linked to sensors on the window glass.

Depending on the amount of movement outside on the street, the drip devices release measured quantities of coloured ink that drip onto the series of fabric-wrapped poles, dying the fabric. Over the course of the installation the colour of the landscape will change as the poles become more saturated with ink.


Design: Matthew Plummer Fernandez. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Matthew Plummer Fernandez. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Sarah McCullough and Michael Ryley. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Sarah McCullough and Michael Ryley. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Sarah McCullough and Michael Ryley. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Sarah McCullough and Michael Ryley. Photo: Andrew Meredith


Design: Sarah McCullough and Michael Ryley. Photo: Andrew Meredith

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