Showing off their Smalls

The winners of the inaugural Smalls awards, which, as the title suggests, aim to celebrate filmmaking for mobile phone or iPod video screens, have been announced.
The Smalls are initiated by design and production company Devilfish, and are the latest example of a creative company using a competition for subtle promotion of its services, as well, of course, as a means of showcasing new talent to the ad and production industries.
The competition, which was free to enter, requested films no longer than three minutes based on the theme of “Moving”. This year’s winner was director Jon Riche, who created a witty pastiche of urban sport parkour that works just as well on a big or small screen (still shown below).

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The winners of the inaugural Smalls awards, which, as the title suggests, aim to celebrate filmmaking for mobile phone or iPod video screens, have been announced.

The Smalls are initiated by design and production company Devilfish, and are the latest example of a creative company using a competition for subtle promotion of its services, as well, of course, as a means of showcasing new talent to the ad and production industries.

The competition, which was free to enter, requested films no longer than three minutes based on the theme of “Moving”. This year’s winner was director Jon Riche, who created a witty pastiche of urban sport parkour that works just as well on a big or small screen (still shown below).

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Demonstrating the breadth of style and content that the awards attracted is the second prize winner, Edward Tiffin, who concentrated on the emotional aspects of the theme and created a touching film set to poetry.

Humour returned to the fore in the third placed film, by Olle Borgar & Daniel Markusson, and also the winner of the best newcomer award, Kagami Shinohara, who entered a film people on playing on interactive dance mats and a roughly sketched animation of an old school computer game respectively.

Films by the winners and the other shortlisted films can be viewed online at www.thesmalls.tv or for a limited period at the Apple Store on London’s Regent Street.

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