Smashing art piece

It’s hardly an unusual sight to see a few smashed windows on an abandoned building, but artist Alex Chinneck seems to have managed the impossible by breaking each pane of glass on a building in Hackney in London in exactly the same way

It’s hardly an unusual sight to see a few smashed windows on an abandoned building, but artist Alex Chinneck seems to have managed the impossible by breaking each pane of glass on a building in Hackney in London in exactly the same way…

Of course, he hasn’t done it quite like that – he actually replaced each of the 312 panels that cover the front of the old Scopes & Sons factory with an identically broken pane. The effect is quite jarring: a regular pattern emerging from a place where you would never expect to see one.

The piece, made in association with Sumarria Lunn Gallery, is called Telling the Truth Through False Teeth and is on show at the Scopes & Sons building where Tudor Road meets Mare Street in Hackney, London E9 7FE until November.

More projects by Chinneck at alexchinneck.com.

Via londonist.com.

 

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