Steven Meisel shoots cinemagraphs for Diesel

Photographer Steven Meisel has shot a series of ads for Diesel’s A/W campaign which, in stores and on some digital billboards, will come to life through subtle looped movements…

Photographer Steven Meisel has shot a series of ads for Diesel‘s A/W campaign which, in stores and on some digital billboards, will come to life through subtle looped movements…
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<p>All the images in the campaign (<a href=
The ads (produced by MAD London) feature fashion models such as Hanne Gaby Odiele and Yuri Pleskun (above) caught in the split second of a camera flash. Only they’re not still images but ‘cinemagraphs’ that incorporate subtle movement. It’s the fact that these cinemagraphs play on the aesthetic of the fashion shot that makes it all the more unexpected (and uncanny) when you realise that the images aren’t still… /></p>
<p>The term ‘cinemagraph’ was coined by US photographers Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg early last year when they released a series of images that function in this way (check out their <a href=
Essentially a cinemagraph works just like a gif file only with a high quality photograph. Elements of the image move as if filmed for a second or two and looped, while the bulk of the image remains as still as a regular photograph. The effect reminds me of the moving painted portraits in Harry Potter stories where the background remains still but the subjects move around.

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<p>The cinemagraph, despite its slightly grand name, is basically a photographic gimmick. Will these ads look good in Diesel stores and help sell clothes? It’s tricky to tell how effective they’ll be but as far as we’re concerned, as long as at least one person each day jumps out of their skin when they suddenly notice the image ‘moving’ then these cinemagraphs will have been worth making.</p>
<p><a href=
The cinemagraph, despite its slightly grand name, is basically a photographic gimmick. Will these ads look good in Diesel stores and help sell clothes? It’s tricky to tell how effective they’ll be but as far as we’re concerned, as long as at least one person each day jumps out of their skin when they suddenly notice the image ‘moving’ then these cinemagraphs will have been worth making.

diesel.com

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Further reading: Read our blog post from June about Matthew DiVito, one of the leading proponents in the world of mesmerising gif files here.

Also, check out our recent post about the 3D lenticular images of The Saline Project by clicking here.

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