Summoning the demon? How safe are creative jobs from automation?

Despite reassuring research suggesting that creative jobs are safe from automation, AI looks likely to take over much of the more mundane work of designers and art directors. But rather than an existential threat, the optimistic view is that by freeing creative people from drudgery, AI could open the door to exciting new opportunities.

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  • Andy Barker 29/03/2017 at 12:42 pm

    Macs killed typesetters and artworkers, Smartphones and photo libraries kill photographers. Sure, bots can do the designs, but what if the client comes up with an illogical suggestion? Can they have a hissy fit? Will they stick to their creative principles?

  • michael gillette 28/03/2017 at 1:42 am

    Also, every post uploaded to social media, neatly cataloged with hashtags and given freely, expands the ever increasing research database that AI learns from. Whether it be our creativity, esoteric culture, or simply the way our world looks from breakfast to last orders, we have become the most diligent unpaid data gatherers for AI.

  • michael gillette 27/03/2017 at 9:10 pm

    I think about this topic a lot. I am an illustrator living in the absolute dead center of San Francisco’s digital world.
    There will always be a cultural need for excellent Imaginative thought provoking new culture. But let’s be honest, how much of that is actually out there? Or allowed/ required to be out there? Or paid for?
    Much creative work is akin to an athlete running on sand: keeping fit and trim to hopefully make that excellent work. Training.
    AI is already, and will further take much of this away.
    The drudgery, might be an intrinsic colour in the spectrum of true creativity. In Chinese ink drawing, the grinding of the ink is the meditative moment where you plan your art, prepare and focus. As for the payment lost, well…extrapolate as you like. Universal Basic Wage perhaps?

    The same day that the deep thought computer beat the Go master, the first Rembrandt created by AI was unveiled. Looked pretty convincing.
    I do wonder what the second will look like though!

  • James Dominic 27/03/2017 at 11:52 am

    Well…the way I see it, thanks to AI, design will continue to be appropriated by non-creative people. There will be no need for creativity, no need for imagination, no need for more than a few moments of indulgence by account managers looking to “get something to the client ASAP.” AI is making the creative design task into what many account managers already believe it to be: just push a few buttons and “play around with it.” This is not to say that that human-directed design is doomed; AI will have the effect of reducing the creative design field to a few exceptionally talented designers at a few exceptionally good agencies.

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