Supermundane: Here & There

Graphic artist Supermundane (Rob Lowe) has a new show at Brighton’s No Walls Gallery, described as both a microsopic and distant look at his work…

Graphic artist Supermundane (Rob Lowe) has a new show at Brighton’s No Walls Gallery, described as both a microscopic and distant look at his work.

Open until late September, Here & There features more than 30 new paintings and drawings in a range of styles, from intricate linework to cosmic ink paintings and simpler geometric prints. The display also features a collection of 80 wooden ‘innocences’ – small domed characters which have appeared in several of Lowe’s previous artworks.

The cosmic paintings are a notable departure from Lowe’s detailed typographic illustrations and large-scale murals and represent a “universal look at his work from afar,” he says. Contrasting multi coloured lines represent the interior of his drawings, much like rings on a tree. “They’re what I think of as being inside my drawings, if you chopped them up,” he explains.

The show builds on Lowe’s previous experiments with size, scale and depth, such as his 2012 exhibition at Kemistry Gallery, which featured a series of geometric designs based on details from his drawings blown up and simplified to the point of abstraction.

It also follows an exhibition at Beach gallery, Stupid Nature, in which he experimented with a more painterly, less controlled approach to painting (the show featured a series of abstract two colour drawings in red, black and blue).

“I’d been playing around with the idea of contextualising this world I’d created in my work over the years, looking at it up close and from a distance,” explains Lowe. “The way the pieces are arranged in the gallery presents a kind of landscape, from very small to vast – the here and the there,” he says.

 

Here & There is on show at No Walls Gallery, 114 Church Street, Brighton BN1 1UD until September 20. For details, see nowallsgallery.com.

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