Banksy

Beautiful Losers

“The nerds are the dispossessed who will inherit the creative earth.” Mike Mills in Beautiful Losers

Blek le Rat: Through the Walls

A pparently, when Blek le Rat was pasting up an image in a London street last year he was asked by an inquisitive passerby: “are you Banksy?” Such is the notable similarity between the two graffiti artist’s work

Inkie’s Urban Art Auction

One of several pieces by urban artist Eine which will go under the hammer next week at an auction to will raise money for Great Ormond Street Hospital in London…

Words To Work By Poster Project

We just received a roll of six typographic posters sent to us from ad agency Publicis Mojo in Sydney. But these aren’t ads. Instead, Mojo creative director Micah Walker tells us the poster project, entitled Words To Work By, is the first of a series of self-initiated projects that will see the agency link up and work with various different artists and designers…

Saville at D&AD

Peter Saville on what’s wrong with design education in the UK
It’s a double dose of Peter Saville on the CR blog today, as we bring you some highlights of the Q&A section of his President’s Lecture for D&AD, which took place in Logan Hall in London last week. Saville discussed a variety of topics, ranging from his recent contemporary art projects to what he thinks of Banksy. Watch clips of the talk here.

Calling All Image Makers…

London-based screenprinting club, Print Club London is hosting another show of screenprints following the success of last years Blisters On My Fingers exhibition. Like last year, there will be 35 exhibiting artists (last year’s artists included Jon Burgerman, Steve Wilson, Richard Hogg, Serge Seidlitz, Jody Barton, Andrew Rae and Si Scott), 35 editioned and signed prints by each, selling for £35 a piece. Only this year, Print Club is offering the chance for all and sundry to be in the show which will take place in July at MC Motors in Dalston, London…

Not so street

Street Art at Tate Modern, installation view, © Tate Photography
As Banksy’s forays into the world of the white cube have shown, the meeting of grafitti art and the formal art establishment can be an uneasy one. This is reiterated in the current exhibition at Tate Modern, titled simply Street Art, which sees six international “urban” artists create artworks for the façade of the iconic building. The talent of the artists – who include Faile, JR, Nunca, Os Gemeos, Sixeart and the much-admired Blu – cannot be faulted but the method of display feels lazy, with all the works displayed on one side of the museum (to maximise the view when crossing over the Millennium Bridge presumably) where they compete with one another for attention.

Blek le Rat: The New Banksy?

Ha – only joking. While Banksy is a relative newcomer to the graffiti scene, Blek le Rat has been stencilling, pasting and daubing his way around the world for nearly thirty years. But the perception of Banksy as the pioneer of street art is certainly the one favoured by the media and the art world. As a result, Banksy’s artistic reputation – no doubt helped by his anonymity – has been elevated to near mythical status. While Blek’s reputation, at least beyond the world of street art, is far less well known, a new book of his work looks certain to bring his art to a wider audience and throw up a few more questions on just how influential he’s been.

Desktop Dan

The Girl with a Pearl Earring Censored, 2005 by Dan Proops
Artist Dan Proops is set to showcase a series of paintings at the Empire Gallery in London from May 1st until 13th. If the surname rings a bell, it might be because he’s the grandson of agony aunt Marjorie Proops, but, as an artist, Proops has gradually been making a name for himself. After featuring in over 25 shows since the age of 14 (exhibiting at some of London’s most prestigious institutions, such as the Cooling Gallery in Cork Street and the Serpentine Gallery) Proops has been attracting acclaim, in part through his painterly reconstructions of computer desktops.