Design Museum

Dear Mr Barnbrook…

The cover of Jonathan Barnbrook’s monograph Barnbrook Bible: The Graphic Design of Jonathan Barnbrook. The book will be published on 19 June, coinciding with Friendly Fire, Barnbrook’s show at the Design Museum
Last month, we asked you to send in questions for designer, typographer and all-round tweaker of the nose of corporate irresponsibility, Jonathan Barnbrook. Here are his answers…

(Almost) All The President’s Men

Ben Terrett of The Design Conspiracy and Noisy Decent Graphics reviews last night’s
Pentagram D&AD President’s Lecture
Last night saw the much anticipated Pentagram D&AD President’s lecture. A packed young audience, as much as 1,200 people, nine Partners on stage, more in the audience and your humble correspondent sat down at the front memorising every word for you lot.

A Small Medium

Artists and designers are transforming the humble button badge into a vibrant communications medium

What Would You Like To Ask Jonathan Barnbrook?

Cover from Jonathan Barnbrook’s upcoming monograph
Well, it worked so well with Non-Format that we’ve decided to do it again…
Send in your questions, we’ll put them to Mr Barnbrook

The Alan Fletcher Show: Some Thoughts

Alan Fletcher as pictured in his final book, Picturing and Poeting, £24.95 / € 39.95, Phaidon 2006
The Design Museum was packed out with the great and good (plus CR) last night for the official opening of Alan Fletcher: Fifty years of graphic work (and play). Given the tragic circumstances, Fletcher having died little more than a month before, the evening was as much celebratory tribute as private view: a chance for the industry to show how much they loved and admired the man. Among those paying homage were Wim Crouwel, Bob Gill and, bizarrely, former quiz show host Bamber Gascoigne (anyone who knows his connection with Fletcher, please enlighten us).
Derek Birdsall gave a touching, if meandering speech and we all left clutching Quentin Newark’s beautiful show guide (the latter features biographical text from the exhibition alongside Peter Wood’s photographs of Fletcher’s gorgeous studio and is almost worth the admission money alone).
Of course the show is great – GTF’s design is respectful and understated while still providing some delightful touches (including a giant 3D Reuters logo) and Emily King cleverly paces the journey through Fletcher’s remarkable career. It’s all there: from the iconoclastic early years, through major corporate work at Pentagram to the exuberance of an independence secured late in life. But as with all great shows, Fletcher’s should be as much about influencing the future as documenting the past. It is the effect that the show will have on those who come to see it that will be as important as the joy of reviewing his triumphs. So here are some thoughts prompted by last night…

A World Without Design?

On the 26 September, as part of the London Design Festival, design consultancy The Partners hosted a panel discussion on the theme of a world without design, tying in with an exhibition on the same theme at their studio. The panellists were designer Paul Priestman of Priestman Goode; Dejan Sudjic, director of the Design Museum and CR editor Patrick Burgoyne. The following is an edited transcript of the discussion.

Graphic Designer

Fushi Wellbeing

Creative Designer

Monddi Design Agency