geometric

Forms of Inquiry

A new exhibition at the Architectural Association asks selected graphic designers to conduct an investigation into an area of architectural practice

A Master of Form and Colour

Hélio Oiticica may not be a household name in the UK but a Tate Modern retrospective looks set to bring his rich artistic output to a much wider audience

RSA by David Pearson

To coincide with its fortieth anniversary, RSA Films commissioned David Pearson to design a new identity for the production company. Pearson is more typically seen between these pages for his book design work, especially for Penguin, and it was this that brought him to RSA’s attention

Kate Moss, The Brand

Kate Moss has, in effect, been a brand for some time. Thanks to the combined efforts of Peter Saville and Paul Barnes, that implicit power has now found explicit form in a logotype

Kate Moss: The Brand

With her first line of clothing due to cause riots in Topshop at the beginning of next month, plus other projects in the pipeline, Brand Moss has arrived, her new image sealed by an identity masterminded by Peter Saville, in collaboration with typographer Paul Barnes.

The Artwork Now Arriving At Platform One…

I have grown to hate the London Underground. I’ve spent 20 years rattling up and down its decrepit routes, in deafening carriages where human beings are subjected to conditions long-since outlawed for cattle, tripping over tourists and wasting hours just waiting. So I’m eternally thankful for the little rays of sunshine that are the stock in trade of LU’s estimable Platform For Art programme. While we’ve written before about its series of artists’ covers for the tube map, its latest project, is on a far grander scale. A Piccadilly Line tube train has been transformed into a 100-metre-long work of art.

Another Design Success Story

Just before Christmas, a strange image arrived in my email in-box. It was attached to a message entitled “Extreme shrinkage was evident, due to the large amount of fat rendered” – a statement, I think you’ll agree, guaranteed to arouse anyone’s curiosity.
The image consisted of an assortment of geometric shapes on a burgundy background – the overall effect being not dissimilar to a “party shirt” I had in 1983. Over the top of this assemblage was a lengthy message urging me to invest in a “hot stock” listed on the market under the somewhat unfortunate acronym ARSS. Apparently I needed to start watching ARSS (insert joke here) as it was about to embark on a spectacular rise. $$$ were promised. And all this highly valuable information was set in a crude machine typeface with the kind of leading and kerning worthy of David Carson on one of his most, err, inspired days.
According to Ironport, a spam filtering firm, unsolicited junk mail now accounts for more than nine out of every ten email messages sent over the internet. The volume of junk has doubled over the last year, chiefly due to what was sitting in my in-box: image spam, one of the most successful and effective design innovations of recent times.

Window to the Future

In a unique collaboration, Creative Review and Selfridges joined forces earlier this year for Shape of the Future. Seven of our Creative Futures winners and runners-up from last year were each given a week in Selfridges’ largest window. The brief was simple: create an installation around the theme of shape, building on the work of the previous occupant. This is what happened next…

Works and Play

At London Metropolitan University’s Met Works centre, designers can grow their own 3D images, print in metal and create works that are as much about touching as looking. Sean Ashcroft reports from a unique creative playground

Making The Book

This year’s D&AD Annual was designed by Andy Probert and James Littlewood, aka Design Project.
Here’s how they did it…

Here we go again…

If you can hear the sound of tabloid knives been sharpened, it’s because this year’s annual opportunity to bash contemporary art, the Turner Prize exhibition, is poised to open at London’s Tate Britain.

One-Sided Story

With wearisome predictability, the UK’s national press have this morning administered a good kicking to BBC One’s new series of channel idents, unveiled yesterday. The idents, produced by Red Bee Media play on the circular shape of One’s initial letter – using a mixture of live action and effects, the shape is formed by bike riders, kite-flyers and even CGI hippos. But the press are more interested in the fact that they cost £1.2 million (that’s for all eight) and (gasp) some of them were even shot ABROAD…

The Photography Annual 2017

Creative Review’s Photography Annual seeks to
celebrate great images – those who take them
and those who commission them. View all the
winning work in our current print issue

Buy the issue

The Annual 2018

The Creative Review Annual is one of the most
respected and trusted awards for the creative
industry. We celebrate the best creative work from
the past year, those who create it and commission it.

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JUNIOR DESIGNER

South East London