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Wim Crouwel: From Groningen to Gridnik

“If I don’t know what to do, I use blue.” Just one of several nuggets delivered deadpan by the charming Wim Crouwel at last night’s D&AD President’s Lecture.

Remodelling the World

Looking at the five images that Edwin Zwakman has contributed to a new exhibition, Tales From the Grid, at the Q Gallery in Derby, you’d be forgiven for thinking that he was just another contemporary photographer with an eye for documenting the modern cityscape. In a way, he is – but it’s the way he goes about making his pictures that separates him from the conventions of urban photography: all of Zwakman’s images are of painstakingly constructed models, assembled from memory.

Towards Creative Activism

Companies whose stories are real, compelling and smartly designed are starting to shine. Sarah Rich of World Changing explains how Creative Review’s readers can help genuinely green businesses to thrive

Towards Creative Activism

This the first page of the April issue of Creative Review. This month, the magazine has no cover. Instead, the biodegradable bag that the magazine is sent out in also fulfils that role, thus saving 8700 sheets of paper
April’s Creative Review is a special issue devoted to sustainability. For it, we asked Sarah Rich, editor of worldchanging.com, to explain how our readers can help genuinely green businesses to thrive.
Conscious consumers in the modern marketplace rarely face an either/or proposition. Gone are the days of choosing between pleasure and principle. Gone is the sacrifice of flavour, colour and style in the name of environmental responsibility. With the likely exception of toilet paper (which it seems still cannot be made both recycled and soft), many of our everyday items can now be found in a luxurious shade of green. Savvy advocates of sustainability know that business is not the enemy of the good…

72+

To say that design studio Bibliothèque are avid collectors of graphic design would be something of an understatement. It’s more like they have an addiction to sourcing print classics, particularly from the European Modernist tradition. But they’ve finally managed to find an outlet for one of their favourite collections; Otl Aicher’s work for the 1972 Munich Olympics, in the form of an exhibiton of some of his best work from the project, and the show, 72, has just launched at London design store Vitsœ.
We met up with Bibliothèque, Mark Adams, owner of Vitsœ, and designer Michael Burke who actually worked on the Olympic project with Aicher and had invaluable first-hand experience of the processes and methods involved in creating this seminal body of work. The following is the full transcript of the discussion that took place at Bibliothèque’s studio. (An edited version appears in our current March issue as part of a four-page feature on Aicher’s legacy and the 72 exhibition).

Window to the Future

In a unique collaboration, Creative Review and Selfridges joined forces earlier this year for Shape of the Future. Seven of our Creative Futures winners and runners-up from last year were each given a week in Selfridges’ largest window. The brief was simple: create an installation around the theme of shape, building on the work of the previous occupant. This is what happened next…

Reading the Classics

Penguin is celebrating 60 years of its Classics range – a series that has consistently set the standard for book jacket design. Steve Hare traces the Classics’ rich design heritage and reveals the future plans for one of publishing’s great imprints

Making The Book

This year’s D&AD Annual was designed by Andy Probert and James Littlewood, aka Design Project.
Here’s how they did it…

Facts Made Fun

As entries on the Wikipedia website soar over the one billion mark, it’s difficult to see how the humble old printed encyclopaedia can possibly compete. A new book from Dorling Kindersley publishers, Pick Me Up, offers a solution: make facts fun.

Beck’s DIY Album Cover

At first glance, you could be forgiven for thinking that the sleeve for Beck’s forthcoming album, The Information is a fairly shoddy effort. The artist’s name is rendered in Lego-esque building block letters against a light blue graph-paper grid. And that’s it.

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Fushi Wellbeing

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Monddi Design Agency