pantone

Faber’s Beckett covers

As part of its 80th anniversary celebrations, Faber & Faber is publishing an extensive series of Samuel Beckett’s works, including 18 novels, plays and short stories, to appear over the next two years. The typographic covers for the series were commissioned by Faber’s senior designer, Miriam Rosenbloom, and designed by A2/SW/HK

They Sell! We Buy!

DR-SI™ (Proto-Sat Nav Locator), SoYo™, North of Nowhere™ (1993)
In the March issue of CR we broke the news that the Designers Republic, one of the most influential graphic design studios of the past 20 years, had closed its doors. Here, Rick Poynor looks back at the studio’s work and assesses its lasting influence…

Australian Summer Madness

It may be winter here in the northern hemisphere but, in Australia, summer is at its height, leading to all sorts of strange behaviour. Agency Publicis Mojo Melbourne decided to erect a series of statues of Summer Madness victims in Sydney and Melbourne to remind people to stay cool in the sun (on behalf of client, Frosty Fruits ice lollies). The models for the statues, however, were created in Hackney, east London, by the artist and modelmaker Wilfrid Wood…

Next Year’s Colour?

According to Pantone, next year’s colour is Mimosa or, PANTONE® 14-0848, as it’s known to its friends..

Killer iPhone Apps

Give an iPhone owner half a chance and they will happily launch into a lengthy demonstration of the latest slew of ‘apps’ that they’ve downloaded for their pocket-sized gadget. Apps are, essentially, packages of software that utilises (hopefully) the best properties of the iPhone’s hardware – ie the multi touch screen, GPS, and the impressively sensitive accelerometer. These properties, combined with a powerful operating system (Unix) and fast internet connection speeds mean that the iPhone is, in short, a creative programmer’s dream come true. Here at CR, we’ve been checking out a wide variety of apps and have compiled a round up of our currentfavourites…

Creative Futures Bursary Project: Kate Moross

For almost 20 years, Creative Review has been encouraging the next generation of talented creatives through our annual Creative Futures scheme in which we celebrate the promise of a selection of emerging talent in visual communications.
This year’s crop of Futures were selected by the CR editorial team – our only criteria were to find indiv­iduals or teams who we feel have an extremely bright future ahead of them and who are indicative of the future direction of the industry.
Just before Christmas, each of our selected Futures gave a talk at one of three Creative Futures events. We invited everyone coming along to the talks to bring a piece of work with them – an image, some text, even a piece of music. We then asked each of our Futures to produce a new piece of work responding to the experience of being selected for the scheme, giving their talk and to the work brought along. These projects were funded by a bursary provided to each Future by CR and PlayStation. Over the next week or so we are posting up the resulting pieces of work plus documentaries on each Future, made for us by Fallon. Here are two new pieces of work by Kate Moross…

Reprinting a classic: Wim Crouwel’s Vormgevers

Mark Blamire of Blanka has reprinted 250 copies of Wim Crouwel’s classic late 60s poster, Vormgevers. But the lack of original artwork and a desire to respect the original posters led Blamire on a long and winding road to eventual success…

Daniel Eatock’s Editions & Originals show

Daniel Eatock’s gallery show, Editions & Originals, opens at London’s Kemistry Gallery today (Friday 16 November) and runs into January. Daniel invited CR down to the gallery for the ultimate private view yesterday morning to check out the show…

The Provocative Mr Meiré

German art director Mike Meiré (above) is renowned in magazine circles for designing two of the most innovative magazines of recent times – brand eins and Econy. Both were celebrated for their clean, cool aesthetic appeal. His latest project, however, deliberately sets out to subvert all the notions of “good” design that his previous work nurtured so carefully. His redesign of cultural magazine 032c was described by Magculture.com as “willfully awkward”. Set against the standards of mainstream graphic design, it is, well, ugly. Here, Meiré explains why…