The Art Of Lost Words

text/gallery is a new experimental showcase for art and design projects inspired by the printed and written word, according to its website. The brainchild of curator Rebecca Pohancenik of Studio Zwei, text/gallery has opened its first exhibition entitled The Art Of Lost Words this week at London’s German Gymnasium which promises to showcase “new design and illustration inspired by language’s forgotten words”…

text/gallery is a new experimental showcase for art and design projects inspired by the printed and written word, according to its website. The brainchild of curator Rebecca Pohancenik of Studio Zwei, text/gallery has opened its first exhibition entitled The Art Of Lost Words this week at London’s German Gymnasium which promises to showcase “new design and illustration inspired by language’s forgotten words”.

The exhibition’s 41 participants include Angus Hyland, Andy Altmann of Why Not Associates, Jonathan Ellery, Spin, David Pearson, Mike Dempsey, David Quay, Alan Kitching, and each has produced a piece of work based on a seldom used word he or she has selected from the English dictionary. Here are a few of the exhibited works:


Redemancy – the art of loving in return. By David Quay


Spin celebrates the word, nubivagant (meaning moving through or among the clouds)


Inergetical – meaning sluggish. By illustrator Andy Smith


Why Not Associates’ Andy Altmann takes on “antithalian”


This piece, created by Johnson Banks spells out “habroneme” which means, rather appropriately, having the appearance of fine threads


No Days Off created this piece in response to the word “jussulent” – an adjective meaning having a soupy consistency: full of broth


Close up of No Days Off’s hand painted piece

The Art Of Lost Words runs until 9 March at The German Gymnasium, Pancras Road, London NW1 (opposite St Pancras International station). Open daily 10.00–18.00. Admission free.

The works are available to buy online at textgallery.info, with proceeds going towards the National Literacy Trust.

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